Blog posts

8 Spellzone Features You Didn’t Know You Needed

Are you making the most of your Spellzone experience? We’ve put together this list of guides to help you take advantage of all our site features: How to Find Your Student's Spellzone Score in 5 Minutes The Spellzone score provides a useful data point for monitoring a student’s progress. Do you know where to find it?   How to Cross-reference Your Student’s Course Pathway with the National Curriculum Want to make sure your students’ pathways align with the National Curriculum? Learn how to fill in any gaps in this blog post.     3 Spelling Tasks to Set Your Students on Spellzone Learn how to set the three types of...

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A Star Wars Word for Wednesday: Lightsaber

May 4th the marked Star Wars Day and to celebrate we chose Star Wars as this month’s Word for Wednesday theme. The date of this commemorative celebration comes from the pun on the Star Wars catchphrase ‘May the Force be with you’. Though the first recorded use of ‘May the 4th be with you’ dates to 1979, the first organised commemorative event for Star Wars Day wasn’t until 2011 when an event was hosted at the Toronto Underground Cinema. Today, Star Wars Day is observed by fans all over the world.  Over the last few weeks, we’ve looked at the words force, Jedi, and droid. Our final...

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A Star Wars Word for Wednesday: Droid

May 4th marked Star Wars Day and to celebrate we chose Star Wars as this month’s Word for Wednesday theme. The date of this commemorative celebration comes from the pun on the Star Wars catchphrase ‘May the Force be with you’. Though the first recorded use of ‘May the 4th be with you’ dates to 1979, the first organised commemorative event for Star Wars Day wasn’t until 2011 when an event was hosted at the Toronto Underground Cinema. Today, Star Wars Day is observed by fans all over the world.  So far we’ve looked at the words force and Jedi. Our third word of the month is droid. ...

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Commonly Confused Words: Knight vs. Night

What does each word mean? In the Middle Ages, a knight was someone who trained in arms and chivalry and served his King or Lord.  Today, in Great Britain, men are awarded knighthoods by the monarch as an honour for contributions to their fields. A knight is also a chess piece that is shaped like a horse.  Here is knight used in some example sentences: Have you read Sir Gawain and the Green Knight?  He was given a knighthood for services to education.  She would have to sacrifice her knight in order to win the game.  Look up knight in the Spellzone dictionary.    Night is the time between sunset and sunrise when...

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A Star Wars Word for Wednesday: Jedi

May 4th marked Star Wars Day and to celebrate we chose Star Wars as this month’s Word for Wednesday theme. The date of this commemorative celebration comes from the pun on the Star Wars catchphrase ‘May the Force be with you’. Though the first recorded use of ‘May the 4th be with you’ dates to 1979, the first organised commemorative event for Star Wars Day wasn’t until 2011 when an event was hosted at the Toronto Underground Cinema. Today, Star Wars Day is observed by fans all over the world.    Last week we looked at the word force. Today's word is Jedi. The Jedi (or Jedi Knights) are the heroes of the Star...

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10 Words for … GOOD

brilliant – very good, beyond what is usual or expected We had a brilliant time at the beach.   excellent – very good, extremely high in quality    The teacher said my homework was excellent.   exceptional – very good, beyond what is usual or expected   The restaurant serves exceptional food.   fabulous – extremely pleasing   The teacher was wearing a fabulous green jacket.   fantastic – extremely or extravagantly good   He was fantastic in the school play.   marvellous – extremely good, like a miracle George concocted a marvellous medicine.   outstanding –...

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A Star Wars Word for Wednesday: Force

May the 4th be with you! Today is Star Wars Day and to celebrate we’ve chosen Star Wars as this month’s Word for Wednesday theme.  The date of this commemorative celebration comes from the pun on the Star Wars catchphrase ‘May the Force be with you’. Though the first recorded use of ‘May the 4th be with you’ dates to 1979, the first organised commemorative event for Star Wars Day wasn’t until 2011 when an event was hosted at the Toronto Underground Cinema. Today, Star Wars Day is observed by fans all over the world.  Our first Star Wars word for May is force.  In English, a force is an influence that produces...

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3 Word Lists for May

Words ending in er In American English, the weak vowel ending is sometimes spelt with the letters 'er'. Learn more about the differences between British English and American English in Unit 36.   Ballroom Dancing Is your spelling better than your samba? Can you remember how to spell rumba? We hope you enjoy practising these ballroom-themed words. Why not add an extra spring to your step and test yourself in our Bouncing Anagrams game?   10 Words for...Said Are you trying to find the perfect way of saying something?  Perhaps the word you’re looking for is… …Croaked?  ...

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April Round-up

3 Word Lists for April   This month we looked at words ending in ‘re’, characters from Much Ado About Nothing for Shakespeare Day, and Easter vocabulary.     How do you like your eggs in the morning? We continued our Easter celebrations in a 10 Words blog post with a twist. Do you prefer you eggs boiled or fried?   Word for Wednesday: Pasta    Made from a durum wheat dough which is shaped and boiled, pasta dishes originate in Italy and are now enjoyed all over the world. Learn about the words spaghetti, pappardelle, farfalle, and orecchiette.   Commonly Confused Words: Fair vs. Fare Finally,...

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Word for Wednesday: Orecchiette

Our Word for Wednesday theme for April is pasta.  Made from a durum wheat dough which is shaped and boiled, pasta dishes originate in Italy and are now enjoyed all over the world. Though the word pasta has been used in English since 1874, it didn't become common until after the second world war. The literal translation of the Italian word pasta is ‘paste’.  Over April, we’ve looked at the words spaghetti, pappardelle and farfalle. Our final word of the month is orecchiette.  Orecchiette come from Apulia in Southern Italy. Made from durum wheat and water, this type of pasta is dome-shaped with a thin centre and...

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Commonly Confused Words: Fair vs. Fare

What does each word mean? A fair is a travelling or periodic exhibition of stalls, rides, or games.  As an adjective, fair is used to describe something that is free of favouritism, cheating, or bias. The word can also be used to describe good weather, something that has a reasonable chance of happening, and skin and hair that is light-coloured.  Here is fair used in some example sentences: There’s a Ferris wheel at the funfair.  The farmer sold her cheeses at the fair.  Make sure you play in a fair way.  It was a fair winter’s day.  They thought they had a fair chance of winning The waiter had fair hair.  ...

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Word for Wednesday: Farfalle

Our Word for Wednesday theme for April is pasta.  Made from a durum wheat dough which is shaped and boiled, pasta dishes originate in Italy and are now enjoyed all over the world. Though the word pasta has been used in English since 1874, it didn't become common until after the second world war. The literal translation of the Italian word pasta is ‘paste’.  So far we’ve looked at the words spaghetti and pappardelle. This week’s word is farfalle.  Farfalle are pinched in the middle, have scalloped edges, and come in a variety of sizes and colours. Larger farfalle are known as farfalloni and smaller farfalle are...

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Word for Wednesday: Pappardelle

Our Word for Wednesday theme for April is pasta.  Made from a durum wheat dough which is shaped and boiled, pasta dishes originate in Italy and are now enjoyed all over the world. Though the word pasta has been used in English since 1874, it didn't become common until after the second world war. The literal translation of the Italian word pasta is ‘paste’.  Last week, we looked at the word spaghetti. Today’s word is pappardelle.  Pappardelle are a ribbon-shaped pasta, similar to fettucine, which we mentioned in last week’s post, but broader. Each ribbon is two or three centimetres wide. Fresh pappardelle often have...

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How do you like your eggs in the morning?

To celebrate Easter week, we’ve got a 10 Words… blog post with a twist. How do you like your eggs in the morning? fried - a fried egg is cooked by cracking an egg into hot oil or butter in frying pan On Sundays I have fried egg and bacon for breakfast.    sunny-side-up - a sunny-side-up egg is only fried on one side so the yolk remains a deep yellow colour and is runny She preferred her eggs sunny-side-up to over-easy.   over-easy - an over-easy fried egg is flipped over so that the top is also cooked lightly  She preferred over-easy eggs to sunny-side-up.   soft-boiled - soft-boiled egg is boiled while still in its...

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Word for Wednesday: Spaghetti

Our Word for Wednesday theme for April is pasta.  Made from a durum wheat dough which is shaped and boiled, pasta dishes originate in Italy and are now enjoyed all over the world. Though the word pasta has been used in English since 1874, it didn't become common until after the second world war. The literal translation of the Italian word pasta is ‘paste’.  Our first pasta-themed word of the month is spaghetti. Spaghetti are long solid strings of pasta, often served with sauce. Spaghetti is the plural of the Italian word ‘spaghetto’ which means ‘thin string’ or ‘twine’. The first known recording of the word in English is...

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3 Word Lists for April

There are over a million word lists on Spellzone. Each one can be used in a variety of online and offline activities. Words ending in 're' In British English, the weak vowel ending is sometimes spelt with the letters 're'. Learn more about the differences between British English and American English in Unit 36.   Easter Vocabulary Easter falls on April 17 this year. If you need a break from all the chocolate, why not spend some time testing yourself on these Easter vocabulary words? You can even practise them in our Easter Egg Hunt spelling game.    Characters from Much Ado About Nothing April 23 marks...

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March Round-up

3 Word Lists for March This month we looked at words ending in ‘or’, Key Stage 3 maths words for World Maths Day , and poetry words for World Poetry Day.    Word for Wednesday: Poetry    To celebrate Word Poetry Day, we also chose poetry as this month’s Word for Wednesday theme.  Learn about the words sonnet, limerick, villanelle, haiku, and acrostic.   10 Ways to Monitor Your Class’s Activity and Results on Spellzone From the most popular activities to a list of every time a student has logged in, find out how your class has been using Spellzone.   How Many Points Have Your...

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Word for Wednesday: Acrostic

March 21 marked World Poetry Day and to celebrate we’ve chosen poetry for this month’s Word for Wednesday theme.   The word poetry dates to the late-fourteenth century and comes from the Old French ‘poetrie’, from the Latin ‘poeta’.  Over March, we’ve looked at the words sonnet, limerick, villanelle, and haiku. Our final word of the month is acrostic.  An acrostic is a poem in which the first letters of each line form a word. The word acrostic dates to the 1580s and comes from the medieval Latin ‘acrostichis’, from the Greek...

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End of Spring Term Checklist for Teachers

With Easter just a few weeks away, here is an end-of-spring-term checklist to help you get ready for the holidays:  Reset the Spelling Ability Test End of term is the perfect point to reset the ability test. Your student’s will be provided with an updated pathway for the start of the new term and you will have a data point to help you map their progress. Compare each student’s end-of-term Spellzone Score to their start-of-term one to see how much they have improved.   Look at your class results   As well as exploring the results section for each student, you can look at and download the results for your class as a...

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Word for Wednesday: Haiku

March 21 marked World Poetry Day and to celebrate we’ve chosen poetry for this month’s Word for Wednesday theme.   The word poetry dates to the late-fourteenth century and comes from the Old French ‘poetrie’, from the Latin ‘poeta’.  Over the past few weeks we’ve looked at the words sonnet, limerick, and villanelle. Today’s word is haiku.  A haiku is a three-lined Japanese poem made up of seventeen syllables, with five syllables in the first and final lines and seven syllables in the middle line. Haiku often describe the natural world. The word haiku was first used...

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"Spellzone really is an incredibly simple, engaging and cost effective resource - it makes a big difference to literacy levels."

Millthorpe School, York

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