Blog posts

3 Word Lists for February 2023

There are thousands of word lists on Spellzone which you can adapt to suit your classroom needs and use in a variety of online and offline activities. Here are our three spelling lists for February: Words ending in 'gle'. This month’s spelling pattern is words ending in 'gle'. The /g l/ sound at the end of these words is usually spelled 'gle'. Learn more about this spelling pattern in Unit 26 - Word endings: -le, and exceptions e.g. -al, -el, -ol.   Astronomy Our Vocabulary Lists tab includes spelling lists themed around different subject areas. How many of these starry words...

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Word for Wednesday: Receive

Our Word for Wednesday theme for 2023 is tricky spelling words. This year, after sharing the definition and etymology of each week’s word, we will end every blog post with some tips and tricks to help you spell it. In January, we looked at the words beginning, believe, friend, and quiet. Our first tricky spelling word for February is receive. If you receive something, it means you accept something that is given to you. Here is receive used in some example sentences: Did you receive my letter? They received some good news. We will receive our spelling test scores later today. Receive dates to around 1300 and comes from the Old...

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January 2023 Round-up

Our 3 Word Lists for January 2023 were words ending in 'dle', bird vocabulary words, and 10 Words for … HARDWORKING. You can adapt any Spellzone word list to your classroom needs and use it in a variety of online and offline activities.   It’s not too late to take a look at our start-of-2023 checklist. In this post, we share 5 quick ways you can ensure you’re making the most out of your Spellzone subscription.   Want to use Spellzone in your classroom but not sure where to begin? This month’s post on how to build a lesson plan with Spellzone is a great place to start.   Spellzone...

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American English vs. British English

Spellzone covers both American English and British English spellings. Learn more in Unit 36. Here is a list of all the articles in our American English vs. British English series: American English vs British English: 6 Key Spelling Differences Flavor or Flavour? Realize or realise? A quick guide to the differences between American English and British English spelling.   60 American English Words and their British English Counterparts A list of common words in American English and British English.   60 More American English Words and their British English Counterparts More common words in American English and British English.   American...

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Word for Wednesday: Quiet

Our Word for Wednesday theme for 2023 is tricky spelling words. This year, after sharing the definition and etymology of each week’s word, we will end every blog post with some tips and tricks to help you spell it. So far we've looked at the words beginning, believe, and friend. Our final tricky spelling word for January is quiet Quiet is the absence of sound. The word is often used to describe things that are calm, still, or silent.  Here is quiet used in some example sentences: The teacher asked the class to be quiet.  We heard the hum of quiet talking. There was a quiet stillness after the storm.  The word dates to...

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Word for Wednesday: Friend

Our Word for Wednesday theme for 2023 is tricky spelling words. This year, after sharing the definition and etymology of each week’s word, we will end every blog post with some tips and tricks to help you spell it. So far we've looked at the words beginning and believe. This week's word is friend. A friend is someone you like and know well. Here is friend used in some example sentences: They had been friends for a long time. We invited just family to our party, no friends. She spoke to her friend on the phone once a month. The word comes from the Old English ‘freond’, from...

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How to Build a Lesson Plan with Spellzone

Before the Lesson Choose what spelling pattern you would like to teach from the course index. Top Tip: Have you tried mapping the course index with the National Curriculum? Top Tip: Click on the ▼ icon to find a specific spelling pattern within a unit. In a separate browser tab, choose a relevant word list from the Course Lists section of Spellzone. Top Tip: Don’t forget you can adapt any word list on Spellzone to suit your classroom needs.   Choose what word list activities you would like your students to do during your lesson. Individual Activities: - Look Say Cover Write Check*   Set as task for whole class. ...

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Start-of-2023 Checklist

Need a refresher? Have you tried our new spelling games  Monkey Business and Cool Spelling? We are always developing Spellzone and all our subscribers have access to site updates as soon as they are available. To help you get the most out of your Spellzone experience, why not book a refresher training session? We offer: -   A 20-minute tour of the main Spellzone features -   A 50-minute tour of all the Spellzone features, including how to track your students’ progress Each session can be tailored specifically for your school’s needs. Book a session for your team today. In the meantime, these links...

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Word for Wednesday: Believe

Our Word for Wednesday theme for 2023 is tricky spelling words. This year, after sharing the definition and etymology of each week’s word, we will end every blog post with some tips and tricks to help you spell it. Last week we looked at the word beginning and this week's word is believe. If you believe something, it means you regard it to be true. If you believe in someone it means you are confident in their ability to do a specific thing.  Here is believe used in some example sentences: The teacher didn’t believe that the dog ate my homework. I believe you will reach your goal. She believed in god. Believe comes from the...

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Word for Wednesday: Beginning

Happy new year! Our Word for Wednesday theme for 2023 is tricky spelling words. This year, after sharing the definition and etymology of each week’s word, we will end every blog post with some tips and tricks to help you spell it. Our first word of the year is beginning. A beginning is the start of something. If something is beginning, it means it is about to start. Here is beginning used in some example sentences: 2023 is only just beginning. It is the beginning of January. The film is beginning at noon. Beginning has been used in English since the later-twelfth century. The Old English word for the ‘start of something’ was ‘fruma’. ...

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3 Word Lists for January 2023

Happy New Year! Did you know that you can adapt any word list on Spellzone? Each one can also be used in a variety of online and offline activities. Words ending in 'dle' Our spelling pattern for January is words ending in 'dle'. In these words, the /d l/ sound at the end of a word is usually spelled 'dle'. Practise this spelling pattern in Unit 26 - Word endings: -le, and exceptions e.g. -al, -el, -ol.   Birds On the Vocabulary Lists tab we have over a hundred lists of words based around different subject areas. How many of these birdy words can you spell? Have you tried...

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2022 Round-up

There are over a million word lists on Spellzone. Every word list can be used in a variety of online and offline activities. Each month in 2022, we shared 3 word lists for students to use when practising their spellings: January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, and December.   We added to our Commonly Confused Words series. This year we looked at: Creak vs. Creek, Fair vs. Fare, Knight vs. Night, Real vs. Reel, Right vs. Rite vs. Write, Sea vs. See, and Which vs. Witch. Have you seen this list of all our Commonly Confused Words posts?   We continued our 10 Words series by sharing synonyms...

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Word for Wednesday: Yule

Our Word for Wednesday theme for December is words you only hear at Christmas.  Over December, we’ve looked at the words carol, tidings and merry. Our final word for 2022 is yule. The words yule and yuletide are old-fashioned terms for Christmas and the festive season which takes place from December 24th to January 6th. The word yuletide dates to the fifteenth century while yule dates to the seventeenth century. Yule comes from the Old English ‘geol’ meaning ‘Chrismastide’, which in comes from an Old Norse name for the winter feast ‘jol’. Some sources propose that the Old Norse...

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Christmas Acrostic

Christmas is a time for stories. Have you heard of these three Christmas characters? What about these three? How did Charles Dickens, author of A Christmas Carol, influence the English language? Ready to deck the halls? Don’t mix up your bows and your boughs. Is it a rain dear or a reindeer? Speaking of reindeer, where did Santa’s reindeer get their names from?  Tried our relaxing Spelling Snowball game yet? Maybe you’ll enjoy these five wintry word lists to practise with. Avoid these 10 spelling mistakes this Christmas. Seasons Greetings! Joyeux Noel! Bah humbug! Find...

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Word for Wednesday: Merry

Our Word for Wednesday theme for December is words you only hear at Christmas.  So far, we’ve looked at the words carol and tidings. Today’s word is merry.  The word merry is used to describe something that is cheerful, fun, and lively.  Like the word tidings in last week’s blog post, merry pops ups in Christmas songs and greetings but seems to hide away for the rest of the year. The word comes from the Old English ‘myrge’ meaning ‘pleasing’ or ‘sweet’. ‘Myrge’ comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘murgijaz’ which likely meant ‘short-lasting’ and comes from...

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Commonly Confused Words: Suite vs. Sweet

What does each word mean? The word suite can be used to describe a musical composition made up of several movements, a series of connected rooms used as a living space in a hotel, and a set of matching furniture.  Here is suite used in some example sentences: This Christmas, the orchestra will play The Nutcracker Suite.  They were staying in the penthouse suite in a very expensive hotel.  Will you buy a three-piece suite for your living room? Look up suite in the Spellzone dictionary.  If something is sweet, it means it tastes like sugar or is pleasing to hear, see, or smell. Sweet is also the British English word for...

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Word for Wednesday: Tidings

Our Word for Wednesday theme for December is words you only hear at Christmas.  Last week, we looked at the word carol and today’s word is tidings.  Tidings is another word for news and dates to around 1200.  The word appears in the song We Wish You A Merry Christmas:  We wish you a merry Christmas We wish you a merry Christmas We wish you a merry Christmas and a happy new year Good tidings we bring to you and your kin We wish you a merry Christmas and a happy new year When used in relation to Christmas, the term good tidings refers to the good news about the birth of Christ. The word comes from the Old English word ‘tidan’...

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Word for Wednesday: Carol

It’s time to return to our Christmassy Words for Wednesday! In the past we’ve looked at decorations and festive food and drink, and our Word for Wednesday theme for December is words you only hear at Christmas.  Our first word for the month is carol.  A carol is a joyful religious song which usually celebrates the birth of Christ (though can be about other seasons). Famous Christmas carols include: O Holy Night, Hark! The Herald Angels Sing, and Oh Come All Ye Faithful. The word dates to around 1300 when it described a ‘joyful song’ or a ‘dance in a ring’ and came to be used in reference to Christmas hymns from around...

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3 Word Lists for December 2022

Words ending in 'kle' Our spelling pattern for December is words ending in 'kle'. In these words, the /k l/ sound at the end of a word can spelled 'kle', especially if the word has more than two syllables. Practise this spelling pattern in Unit 26.    Characters from A Christmas Carol  For book is a classic Christmas tale to read once a year while curled up in front of a roaring fire, for others it’s a GCSE coursework text. Our second list this month is perfect for getting your head around the how to spell each character’s name. Learn more about Charles Dickens’s influence...

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Word for Wednesday: Witty

Our Word for Wednesday theme for November is other words for funny. If something is funny, it means that it provokes laughter. The word has been used in English since 1756 and comes from the word ‘fun-‘ and the suffix ‘-y'. 'Fun' comes from the Middle English ‘fonnen’ meaning ‘befool’. Over November we’ve looked at the words amusing, droll, hilarious. and silly. Our final funny word of the month is witty. If something is witty, it means it is characterised by quick and inventive verbal humour  Here is witty used in some example sentences: They exchanged a witty...

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"Thank goodness for Spellzone during this remote learning phase. The site is easy for students to navigate independently and they're really enjoying the activities and spelling games. You get an awful lot for your money with Spellzone. Really reassuring is the very prompt response with helpdesk queries. I've very rarely needed the helpdesk, but when I have, the issue has been addressed and sorted within a very short time."

Sarah Taggart, Oasis Academy Lord's Hill