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3 Word Lists for October 2022

Words ending in 'ble' Our spelling pattern for October is words ending in ‘ble’. Practise this spelling pattern in Unit 26.   Trick-or-Treat  With October comes the countdown to Halloween! One of the most fun Halloween traditions is trick-or-treating. This is when children dress up in costumes and visit houses in the neighbourhood. Those who answer their doors are given the option of giving the children treat (like candy or an apple) or facing a trick. If you want to learn about costumes and candy, this is the list for you.     Scary Words The English language is full of weird and wonderful...

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September 2022 Round-Up

3 Word Lists for September 2022 This month's English vocabulary lists were ‘al’ as a suffix, Key Stage 3: Science, and 10 Words for … SURPISED. Have you tried our new Monkey Business game?   New Term Admin To help you get ready for the new school year, we shared blog posts on how to add new students to your account and how to remove old ones. Are you making the most of these Spellzone features?   Commonly Confused Words This month we shared two Commonly Confused Words blog posts. Do you know the difference between the words rite, right, and write? What about pair, pare, and pear?   ...

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Word for Wednesday: E.g.

Our Word for Wednesday theme for September is Latin expressions used in English. Over September we've looked at the terms et cetera, de facto, and ad hoc. Our final Latin expression for the month is the  E.g. is commonly used in English as an abbreviation for exempli gratia and means ‘for the sake of example’.  Here is e.g. used in some example sentences: The Spellzone course includes a range of spelling activities, e.g. word lists, spelling tests, word games. There is likely to be a range of extreme weathers, e.g. rain, snow, and heavy wind. We will be serving light snacks (e.g. sandwiches, crisps, and fruit) at the...

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Word for Wednesday: Ad hoc

Our Word for Wednesday theme for September is Latin expressions used in English. So far we’ve looked at the phrases et cetera and de facto. Today’s Latin expression is ad hoc. Ad hoc translates to ‘for this’, and describes something that is created or done for a specific and immediate purpose. Something that is created ad hoc, by definition, usually cannot be planned for in advance, because it responds to unexpected needs Here is ad hoc used in some example sentences: The company hires new staff on an ad hoc basis. Normally I work from home, but I do go into the office for ad hoc meetings. They formed an ad hoc committee to...

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Commonly Confused Words: Right vs. Rite vs. Write

What does each word mean? If someone is right about something (rather than wrong), it means they are correct about it. If something is to the right (rather than the left), it means it is on the south side of something that is facing east. If someone has the right to something, it means they are entitled to it. Here is right used in some example sentences: I got all the answers right in the spelling test. The plates are in the cupboard on the right.  We have the right to vote.    Look up right in the Spellzone dictionary. A rite is a ceremony or observance which is often relgious in nature. Here is rite used in some...

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Word for Wednesday: De facto

Our Word for Wednesday theme for September is Latin expressions used in English. Last week we looked at the term et cetera and today we are looking at the term de facto. De facto is a Latin term with legal roots. The expression means ‘in fact’ or ‘in reality’ and it refers to something that exists but may not necessarily be legally ordained. Here is de facto used in some example sentences: She was the de facto leader of the group. The de facto official language was English. They are not legally married, but they’ve been together so long they are de facto spouses.  De facto is often used to contrast...

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Word for Wednesday: Et cetera

Our Word for Wednesday theme for September is Latin expressions used in English. Our first Latin expression of the month is et cetera. Et cetera, often abbreviated to etc., is commonly used at the end of a list as a way of saying ‘and other similar things’ or ‘and so on’. Here is et cetera used in some example sentences: The Spellzone course uses a range of spelling techniques: word lists, spelling tests, word games, et cetera. Please pack for a range of weathers: rain, snow, wind, et cetera. We will be serving light snacks (sandwiches, crisps, fruit, et cetera) at the party. If you are abbreviating et cetera to etc., you will need a full stop...

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Get ready for the new school year: how to add students to your account

There are four ways to add students to Spellzone: 1)    If you would like to add one or two students Log into Spellzone Click on ‘Students’ in the blue toolbar Click on ‘Create students' Under the ‘Manually add a student’  heading, click on ‘Add a student’ Fill in the student’s first name and surname. Choose between manual login or Google login If using manual login, fill in the username, password, and email address if you would like to If using Google login, fill in the student’s Google email address Choose whether you would like to enable the Course Pathway Click...

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3 Word Lists for September 2022

‘al’ as a suffix Our spelling pattern for September is ‘al’ as a suffix. As -al is a vowel suffix, any vowel at the end of a root word is removed before the suffix is added.  Practise this spelling pattern in Unit 26.   Key Stage 3: Science The new school term is the perfect time to refamiliarise yourself will Spellzone's features.  Don’t forget Spellzone doesn’t need to be limited to the English department: our word lists are the perfect tool for learning new topic words in primary schools and new subject-specific vocabulary at KS3 and GCSE level. Why...

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August 2022 Round-Up

­­­­3 Word Lists for August This month's English vocabulary lists were words ending in ‘ory’, compound words, and 10 Words for … HOT. Have you tried our Summer Spelling game?   New Term Admin To help you get ready for the new school year, we shared blog posts on how to add new students to your account and how to remove old ones. Are you making the most of these eight Spellzone features?   Commonly Confused Words: Sea vs. See We returned to our Commonly Confused Words series this month with these two words – do you know when to use each one?   Word for Wednesday: Condiments ...

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Word for Wednesday: Chutney

Our Word for Wednesday theme for August is condiments. A condiment is added to food to enhance its flavour. The word has been used in English since the mid-fifteenth century and comes from the Latin ‘condire’ meaning ‘to pickle’. Over August we’ve looked at the words mustard, ketchup, mayonnaise, and sriracha. Our final condiment for the month is chutney. Chutney is a spicy condiment of Indian origin that has been eaten since 500 BCE. It is made from fruits or vegetables cooked in vinegar, spices, and sugar. Unlike pickles – known in India as ‘achar’ – chutneys are often freshly prepared....

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Get ready for the new school year: how to remove old students, classes, and staff members from your account

With the new school year fast approaching, it’s time to make sure your Spellzone account is ready for your students and staff to start work. Students At the start of the year, it is likely that you will have students who no longer need to use Spellzone. To delete a whole class of students from your school’s account: Log into Spellzone Click on the blue ‘Classes’ tab Click on the class of students you would like to delete Click on the ‘Select all’ button at the end of the top row on the student roll table Scroll to the bottom of the student roll Click on ‘Delete’ Confirm that you have chosen the correct student/s ...

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Word for Wednesday: Sriracha

Our Word for Wednesday theme for August is condiments. A condiment is added to food to enhance its flavour. The word has been used in English since the mid-fifteenth century and comes from the Latin ‘condire’ meaning ‘to pickle’. Over the last few weeks, we’ve looked at the condiments mustard, ketchup, and mayonnaise. This week’s word is sriracha. Sriracha is a spicy red sauce made from red chilli peppers and garlic that is popular in Thai and Vietnamese cuisine. In Thailand, sriracha is often used for dipping and is especially eaten with omelette and seafood. In Vietnam, it is commonly eaten with pho, fried noodles,...

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Commonly Confused Words: Sea vs. See

What does each word mean? A sea is a large body of salt water that surrounds land masses. The word is sometimes used figuratively to mean a large mass of something. Here is sea used in some example sentences: I love to swim in the sea. The story is about someone who sailed the seven seas. It was hard to see the art through the sea of phones trying to take a picture of it. Look up sea in the Spellzone dictionary. If you see something, it means you perceive it by sight. The word is also used to describe the act of imagining something with your mind’s eye. Here is see used in some example sentences: Can you see the...

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Word for Wednesday: Mayonnaise

Our Word for Wednesday theme for August is condiments. A condiment is added to food to enhance its flavour. The word has been used in English since the mid-fifteenth century and comes from the Latin ‘condire’ meaning ‘to pickle’. So far we’ve looked at the words mustard and ketchup. Today’s word is mayonnaise. Mayonnaise – also often called by its nickname mayo – is a thick creamy sauce made with egg yolks, oil, and either vinegar or lemon juice. This French word (which dates to 1806) has been used in English since 1815. It is probably a corruption of ‘mahonnaise’ and likely got its name...

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Signed up for a Free Trial? It’s time to add your students!

The best way to see evaluate how a Spellzone subscription might be used within your school is to trial it with as many student as possible. A free trial allows you to add 1200 students to your Spellzone account. The resource is suitable for students aged six to adult. Once you have signed up for a free trial, there are four ways to add students to Spellzone: 1)    If you would like to add one or two students Log into Spellzone Click on ‘Students’ in the blue toolbar Click on ‘Create students' Under the ‘Manually add a student’  heading, click on ‘Add a student’ Fill in the student’s first name...

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Word for Wednesday: Ketchup

Our Word for Wednesday theme for August is condiments. A condiment is added to food to enhance its flavour. The word has been used in English since the mid-fifteenth century and comes from the Latin ‘condire’ meaning ‘to pickle’. Last week, we looked at the word mustard and today’s condiment is ketchup. Ketchup is a red sauce made from tomatoes and vinegar. It is often used as a relish in burgers or eaten with chips (or French fries if you speak American English!). This condiment was first known in English as 'catchup' and later as 'catsup' (the latter of which is still sometimes used in American Engish)....

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Word for Wednesday: Mustard

Our Word for Wednesday theme for August is condiments. A condiment is added to food to enhance its flavour. The word has been used in English since the mid-fifteenth century and comes from the Latin ‘condire’ meaning ‘to pickle’. As Saturday August 5th marks National Mustard Day – a celebration of all things mustard that started in Wisconsin in 1991 – we couldn’t resist choosing the spicy condiment for our first word of the week. Mustard is a pungent yellow or brown paste made from ground mustard seeds. It has a strong hot taste and is often eaten with meat. Though mustard was likely eaten by ancient civilisations, the word...

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3 Word Lists for August

Words ending in 'ory' Our spelling pattern for August is words ending in 'ory'. In these words, the weak vowel sound before a 'y' is spelled with the letters 'or'. Practise this spelling pattern in Unit 25.   Compound Words A compound word is a word that is made up of two or more other words. While the compound words in this list do not require hyphens, other compound words do. Test yourself on these words and then learn more.   10 Words for... HOT Who’s feeling the heat? Our 10 Words series is designed to help you expand your vocabulary. In this...

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July Round-Up

3 Word Lists for July This month's English vocabulary lists were words ending in ‘ary’, portmanteau words to celebrate Alice’s Day, and summer-holiday spellings. Have you tried our Summer Spelling game?   Word for Wednesday July 2 marked Alice’s Day: a festival of all things Alice in Wonderland. To celebrate, we also chose portmanteau words as our Word for Wednesday theme for July. A portmanteau word is made up of two or more existing words that have been blended together. The term was coined by Lewis Carrol in his 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There. Learn more about the words...

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"Spellzone is incredibly easy to access and caters for a wide range of abilities, which means you can use it throughout the school at a range of levels, making it fantastic value for money as a learning resource."

Anne Shisler, SENCO, City of London School for Girls

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