Spelling English spelling blog http://www.spellzone.com/ Information about all things regarding spelling, English language, English teaching, language help and learning and foreign languages English, spelling, language Spelling English spelling course http://www.spellzone.com/images/spellzone_name_on_small.jpg http://www.spellzone.com/ confusing english words, by, bye, buy, preposition, adverb, Spellzone, english dictionary, example english sentences, vocabulary lists, word lists Commonly Confused Words: By vs. Bye vs. Buy http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBy%5Fvs%2E%5FBye%5Fvs%2E%5FBuy <p><strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p><strong>By</strong> is a preposition that is used to identify who or what performed an action, the means by which something was achieved, the amount or size of a margin, a deadline or the end of a particular time period, the period in which something happens, or the location in relation to what is beside it. As an adverb it means ‘to go past a certain point’. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/by">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>by</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>The damage was caused <strong>by</strong> a tornado. </li> <li>The house was cleaned <strong>by</strong> my brother. </li> <li>He got full marks on his spelling test <strong>by</strong> practising every day.</li> <li>Coursework must be submitted <strong>by</strong> the end of the month. </li> <li>Owls hunt <strong>by</strong> night. </li> <li>There’s a new café <strong>by</strong> the market.</li> <li>We drove <strong>by</strong> the house. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=by&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>by</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Bye</strong> is a farewell remark which is short for ‘goodbye’.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/bye">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>bye</strong> used in an example sentence:</p> <ul> <li>‘Good<strong>bye</strong>,’ she called. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=bye&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>bye</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Buy</strong> is a verb meaning ‘to purchase’ or ‘to accept as true’.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/buy">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>buy</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The couple considered whether or not they could afford to <strong>buy</strong> a new car. </li> <li>Money can’t <strong>buy</strong> happiness. </li> <li>She didn’t <strong>buy</strong> the excuse her friend gave for his lateness. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=buy&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>buy</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between by, bye and buy?</strong></p> <p>Come up with a sentence or phase which uses each letter of the word to help you remember how to spell it. For example:</p> <ul> <li>My mother has my <strong>b</strong>aby photos filed <strong>b</strong>y <strong>y</strong>ear. </li> <li>‘<strong>B</strong>ye,’ <strong>y</strong>elled the <strong>e</strong>lephant.</li> <li><strong>b</strong>uy <strong>u</strong>mbrellas <strong>y</strong>early </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hair_vs._Hare.htm">Hair vs. Hare</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">Heir vs. Air</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 21 May 2018 16:10:13 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBy%5Fvs%2E%5FBye%5Fvs%2E%5FBuy Prince Harry, Meghan Markle, royal wedding, Prince Louis, royalty, idioms, word definitions, learn English language, Shakespeare, Richard III, beauty queen, drama queen, jewel in the crown, Hans Christian Anderson, British Nobility, spelling lists Idioms about Royalty for a Royal Wedding http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FRoyalty%5Ffor%5Fa%5FRoyal%5FWedding <p> With the birth of Prince Louis last month, and Prince Harry’s wedding to Meghan Markle just a few days away, we decided it was the perfect time to look at idioms about royalty.</p> <p>An idiom is a combination of words that has a figurative meaning separate from the actual definitions of the words used. With an estimated 25,000 idioms, it’s no wonder English is such a difficult language to learn! </p> <p>Here are the royalty-related idioms we managed to come up with – can you think of any others? </p> <ol> <li> <strong>a cat may look like a king</strong> – someone of low status still has rights </li> <li> <strong>a horse, a horse, a kingdom for my horse</strong> – a quotation from Shakespeare’s <em>Richard III</em> that is sometimes repeated ironically when someone needs something unimportant </li> <li><strong>a royal pain</strong> – an extremely annoying/tedious person or thing </li> <li><strong>beauty queen</strong> – the winner of a beauty contest </li> <li><strong>crowning glory</strong> – the best/most notable aspect of something</li> <li><strong>drama queen</strong> – someone who responds to situations in a melodramatic manner </li> <li><strong>fit for a king/queen</strong> – of very high quality </li> <li><strong>jewel in the crown</strong> – the most valuable or successful part of something </li> <li><strong>king’s ransom</strong> – a large amount of money </li> <li><strong>kingdom come</strong> – the afterlife </li> <li><strong>on the (porcelain) throne</strong> – using the toilet </li> <li><strong>Prince Charming</strong> – the name of a fairy tale hero that used to describe an ideal man who is both handsome and of good character </li> <li><strong>queen bee</strong> – a woman with a dominant position in a group or sphere </li> <li><strong>royal road to</strong> – an easy way of attaining something </li> <li><strong>the customer is king</strong> – the customer’s satisfaction is the highest priority </li> <li><strong>the emperor’s new clothes/the emperor has no clothes</strong> – a reference to a Hans Christian Anderson tale which describes a situation in which someone believes in the importance of something that is worthless </li> <li><strong>till/until kingdom come</strong> – forever </li> <li><strong>to be the king/queen of something</strong> – to be the best at something </li> <li><strong>to build castles in the air</strong> – to daydream about unattainable things </li> <li><strong>to court someone</strong> – to flatter or flirt with someone with the hope of winning their favour. </li> <li><strong>to crown it all</strong> – introducing the final event in a series of either very fortunate or very unfortunate events </li> <li><strong>to give the royal treatment</strong> – to treat or care for someone very well </li> <li><strong>to hold court</strong> – to be surrounded by admirers and the centre of attention </li> <li><strong>to live like a king/queen</strong> – to live in great comfort and luxury </li> <li><strong>to lord it over</strong> – to behave as if you are more important/know better than someone else </li> </ol> <p>Why not have a go at our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=394913">British Nobility</a> spelling list? </p> <p>If you liked this post, check out our other articles on idioms:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=394913">Idioms about Emotions </a></li> <li>Idioms about Birds – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Tue, 15 May 2018 08:48:05 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FRoyalty%5Ffor%5Fa%5FRoyal%5FWedding confusing English words, hair, hare, similar english words, human skin, animal skin, Spellzone, English dictionary, dictionary definition of words, Goldilocks, Rapunzel, Medusa, vocabulary lists, long-eared mammal, example english sentences, Old English, Commonly Confused Words: Hair vs. Hare http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHair%5Fvs%2E%5FHare <p>Last week we looked at the difference between the words ‘<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">heir’ and ‘air’</a>. Here are two very similar words that people also often mix up. <p> <strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p><strong>Hairs</strong> are thin strands that grow from human and animal skin.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/hair">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>hair</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Goldilocks is famous for her golden <strong>hair</strong>. </li> <li>Rapunzel is famous for her extremely long <strong>hair</strong>. </li> <li>Medusa is famous for having snakes instead of <strong>hair</strong>.</li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=hair&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>hair</strong>. </p> <p>A <strong>hare</strong> is a fast, long-eared mammal similar to but larger than a rabbit. The word is also used as verb to describe running with great speed. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/hare">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>hare</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>In the story of the <strong>hare</strong> and the tortoise, the slow and steady tortoise wins the race.</li> <li>The dog <strong>hared</strong> after the ball. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=hare&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>hare</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Hair </strong>comes from the Old English ‘hær’ which in turn comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘khæran’. </p> <p><strong>Hare </strong>comes from the Old English ‘hara’ which in turn comes from the West Germanic ‘hasan’. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between hair and hare?</strong></p> <ul> <li>H<strong>are</strong> has the word <strong>are</strong> in it. Try using both in a sentence: ‘H<strong>are</strong>s <strong>are</strong> my favourite animal.’ </li> <li>H<strong>air</strong> has the word <strong>air</strong> in it. Try using both in a sentence: ‘She let her h<strong>air</strong> <strong>air</strong>-dry.’ </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">Heir vs. Air</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Wed, 09 May 2018 11:56:47 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHair%5Fvs%2E%5FHare commonly confused English words, heir, air, inherit an estate, title, or office, Spellzone dictionary, Prince Charles, heir apparent, British throne, Harry Potter, Tom Riddle, Slytherin, oxygen, verb, broadcasting, vocabulary lists Commonly Confused Words: Heir vs. Air http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHeir%5Fvs%2E%5FAir <p> <strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p>An <strong>heir</strong> is a person who is entitled by law or by the terms of a will to inherit the estate, title, or office of another. The word is pronounced with a silent ‘<em>h</em>’ like ‘<em>air</em>’. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/heir">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>heir</strong> used in an example sentence:</p> <ul> <li>Prince Charles is the <strong>heir</strong> apparent to the British throne. </li> <li>In the <em>Harry Potter</em> series, Tom Riddle is Slytherin’s <strong>heir</strong>.</li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=heir&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word heir.<br /> </p> <p>The word <strong>air</strong> can refer to a mixture of gases (especially oxygen) required for breathing, the region of free space above the ground, or a distinctive but intangible quality or impression surrounding a person or thing. As a verb the word can refer to the act of exposing something to air or the act of broadcasting something on the television or radio.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/air">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>air</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The swimmer came up for <strong>air</strong>. </li> <li>The smell of fresh bread wafted through the <strong>air</strong>.</li> <li>He carried with him an <strong>air</strong> of superiority.</li> <li>Don’t forget to <strong>air</strong> out the bathroom after you’ve had a shower. </li> <li>The programme will <strong>air</strong> at 9pm. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=air&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word air.<br /> </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Heir</strong> is an Anglo-French word dating back to around 1300. It comes from the Latin ‘<em>heredem</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Air</strong> is a twelfth-century Old French word meaning ‘<em>atmosphere, breeze, weather</em>’ that has been used in English since around 1300. It comes from the Latin ‘<em>aer</em>’. The word has been used to mean ‘<em>expose to air</em>’ since the 1520s, to mean ‘<em>manner</em>’ or ‘<em>appearance</em>’ since the 1590s, and in a broadcasting sense since 1927.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between heir and air?</strong></p> <p><strong>Heir</strong> has the word <strong>he</strong> in it. Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘<strong>He</strong> was the <strong>heir</strong> to his family’s fortune.’ </p> <p>Try putting both words in the same sentence: ‘She is the <strong>heir</strong> to a large <strong>air</strong> travel company.’<br /> </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 01 May 2018 19:59:42 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHeir%5Fvs%2E%5FAir Spellzone, Shakespeare, William Shakespeare’s birthday, Shakespeare Day, William Shakespeare, the Bard, English words, idioms, love is blind, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello Spellzone and Shakespeare http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spellzone%5Fand%5FShakespeare <p>Although we don’t know the exact date of William Shakespeare’s birthday, he was baptised on April 26th 1564. Scholars believe he was probably born on April 23rd, and so every year, on this date, people in the United Kingdom celebrate Shakespeare Day.</p> <p>At Spellzone we’re huge fans of William Shakespeare – so much so that we’ve written about him many times over the years. Indeed, the Bard is a difficult subject to avoid because so many English words, idioms, and expressions were made popular by their appearance in his work.</p> <p>Here are some of our favourite articles and resources on William Shakespeare and his plays:</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Shakespeare_in_Love.htm">Shakespeare in Love</a></strong></p> <p>Shakespeare is famous for both his romantic comedies and his romantic tragedies so it’s no wonder that some of the most famous phrases on the nature of love were made popular in his plays. Which play does the phrase ‘love is blind’ appear in? What about ‘star-crossed lovers’? Find out in this Valentine’s-Day-themed article.</p> <p><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_folder.cfm?Folder=190"><strong>Characters from Shakespeare's Plays</strong></a></p> <p>If you are a school or university student trying to get your head around the various names of Shakespeare’s characters and how to spell them, this is the resource for you. Learn how to spell the names of the characters in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=9558">Twelfth Night</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=9556">Julius Caesar</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=8656">Much Ado About Nothing</a>, The Merchant of Venice (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=8218">part 1 </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=8219">part 2</a>), <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=6802">Othello</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5408">A Midsummer Night’s Dream</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5407">Romeo and Juliet</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5406">Macbeth</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5405">The Tempest</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5404">King Lear</a>.</p> <p>The word list feature is an essential part of Spellzone and allows you to personalise the course to suit your needs. This means if you’re studying a play that we don’t already have a word list, you can create your own <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Bard.htm">Word for Wednesday: Bard</a></strong></p> <p>Did you know that William Shakespeare was voted the United Kingdom’s greatest cultural icon by the British Council? If he were still alive today, the Bard would be 454 years old this year. In this post from our ‘Word for Wednesday’series, we look at the word ‘bard’ and where it comes from in more detail.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Puckish.htm">Puckish</a></strong></p> <p>‘Puckish’ is an adjective that describes someone who has a mischievous, playful sense of humour – like the fairy Puck. Puck does not come from one specific text, but is a type of character from English folklore, also known as Robin Goodfellow or Hobgoblin. The word refers to both an individual mischievous wood sprite or fairy, and a group of such creatures. It was William Shakespeare’s play <em>A Midsummer’s Night Dream</em> (believed to be written between 1590 and 1596) that most likely brought ‘Puck’ into popularity. This article is part of our ‘Words from Literature’ series – click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Meet_Mrs_Malaprop.htm">here</a> to learn about the word ‘puckish’ and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Quixotic.htm">here</a> to learn about the word ‘quixotic’.</p> <p><strong> <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Misremembered_Quotes_from_Macbeth.htm">Three Misremembered Quotes from Macbeth</a></strong></p> <p> In this article, we look at three passages from <em>Macbeth </em>that are often misquoted. Have you ever heard the phrase ‘hubble bubble toil and trouble’? What about ‘one foul swoop’? Click on the link to find out what the actual quotes are. </p> <p>Have a wonderful week!</p> Tue, 24 Apr 2018 09:49:31 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spellzone%5Fand%5FShakespeare active voice, passive voice, how to phrase a sentence, verb, active verb, passive verb, English writing, research papers, english sentences, girls’ schools, boys’ schools, school league tables Active Voice vs. Passive Voice http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Active%5FVoice%5Fvs%2E%5FPassive%5FVoice <p> Depending on the way you phrase a sentence, a verb can be either active or passive. The active voice is more common in everyday writing, whereas the passive voice is usually used in formal documents such as official reports or research papers.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">subject</a> of a sentence is the person or thing the sentence is about. When the verb is <strong>active</strong>, it means the subject is <strong>doing</strong> the action that the verb indicates. If the verb is <strong>passive</strong>, it means the subject is having that the action the verb indicates <strong>done to them</strong>. The voice you choose to write a sentence in will help emphasise what the most important aspect of the sentence is. </p> <p>Let’s look at some examples of the <strong>active</strong> voice vs. the <strong>passive</strong> voice: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Active:</strong> <br /> <br /> ‘The girls’ school <strong>outranked</strong> the boys’ school in the league table.’ <br /> <br /> This sentence shows the reader that the important part of the sentence is the girls’ school’s success. It would work well in a piece promoting the school. <br /> <br /> </li> <li> <strong>Passive:</strong> <br /> <br /> “The boys’ school were <strong>outranked</strong> by the girls’ school in league table.” <br /> <br /> This sentence focuses on the boys’ school and so would be odd in a piece about the girls’ school. It would, however, work well in an article exploring whether boys and girls thrive under different learning methods. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Active: <br /> <br /> </strong>‘The university newspaper <strong>publishes</strong> job advertisements.’ <br /> <br /> This sentence emphasises the newspaper and would be useful when describing the types or articles and advertisements it publishes. <br /> <br /> </li> <li> <strong>Passive:</strong> <br /> <br /> ‘Job advertisements <strong>are published</strong> in the university newspaper.’ <br /> <br /> In this case, the job advertisements themselves are more significant than where they are published. This sentence might be useful when helping someone who is looking for a job. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Active: <br /> <br /> </strong>‘Hundreds of wild animals inhabit the park’. <br /> <br /> You might catch a wildlife lover’s attention with this sentence. The animals are more important than the park. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Passive:</strong> <br /> <br /> ‘The park is inhabited by hundreds of wild animals.’ <br /> <br /> This sentence draws attention to the park. It would work well in a tourism brochure that cites the park’s wildlife as one of many reasons to visit it.</li> </ul> <p><strong>If you found this article useful, why not check out some of our other posts?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Formatting_Speech.htm">Tips for Formatting Speech</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">Eight Tips for Creating Mnemonics</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Exam_Tips.htm">Exam Tips</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Adding_Suffixes.htm">Five Tips for Adding Suffixes</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Spelling_Words_with_Silent_Letters.htm">Five Tips for Spelling Words with Silent Letters</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_A_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /A/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_Seven_Ways_of_Spelling_the_Long_E_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /E/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_I_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /I/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_O_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /O/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Four_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_U_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /U/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm">How to Use a Semi Colon</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">When to Use Capital Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shoulda%2C_Coulda%2C_Woulda-cc_Using_Apostrophes_to_Indicate_Missing_Letters">How to Use Apostrophes to Indicate Missing Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">Ten Tips for Using Apostrophes</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Handling_Homophones.htm">Tips for Handling Homophones</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Forming_Abbreviations.htm">Top Tips for Forming Abbreviations</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">When to Use Capital Letters</a></li> <li>Word Classes (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">part one </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_2.htm">part two</a>)<br /> </li> </ul> <p> Have a great week! </p> Mon, 16 Apr 2018 09:43:59 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Active%5FVoice%5Fvs%2E%5FPassive%5FVoice idioms, emotion idioms, idioms of emotion, chip on your shoulder, aggressive behaviour, hard as nails, pleased as punch, at the end of your tether, cheesed off, down in the dumps, fools paradise, hopping mad, in stitches, on cloud nine, on the warpath Idioms about Emotion http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FEmotion <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" /> <title>Idioms about Emotion</title> </head> <body> <ol> <li> <strong>a chip on your shoulder</strong> - an ingrained resentment or grievance due to a feeling of inferiority and often marked by aggressive behaviour </li> <li><strong>afraid of your own shadow - </strong>easily frightened </li> <li><strong>as hard as nails</strong> - tough, strong/unfeeling, callous</li> <li><strong>as pleased as punch</strong> - delighted, proud </li> <li><strong>at the end of your tether/rope</strong> - to have lost all your patience </li> <li><strong>cheesed off</strong> - annoyed</li> <li><strong>down in the dumps</strong> - unhappy, depressed </li> <li><strong>foaming at the mouth</strong> - very angry </li> <li><strong>fool’s paradise</strong> - happiness predicated on ignoring potential problems or troubles </li> <li><strong>happy camper</strong> - someone who is comfortable and content </li> <li><strong>happy-go-lucky</strong> - cheerfully content, unconcerned about the future </li> <li><strong>hopping mad</strong> - extremely angry </li> <li><strong>in stitches</strong> - laughing uncontrollably </li> <li><strong>like a dog with two tails</strong> - delighted </li> <li><strong>on cloud nine </strong>- very happy </li> <li><strong>on the warpath</strong> - angry and eager for confrontation </li> <li><strong>on top of the world</strong> - very happy, elated </li> <li><strong>over the moon</strong> - delighted </li> <li><strong>to bite someone’s head off</strong> - to respond to someone sharply/angrily </li> <li><strong>to blow a fuse/blow your top</strong> - to lose your temper </li> <li><strong> to feel blue - </strong>to feel sad/depressed/melancholy </li> <li><strong>to fly off the handle</strong> - to suddenly lose your temper </li> <li><strong>to go through the roof</strong> - to suddenly become very angry </li> <li><strong>to go to pieces/fall apart</strong> - to become so nervous or upset that you are unable to behave/perform normally </li> <li><strong>up the wall</strong> - extremely annoyed/frustrated/angry </li> </ol> <p>If you found this post useful, why not take a look at some of our other articles about idioms?</p> <ul> <li>Idioms about Birds – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> </body> </html> Thu, 12 Apr 2018 08:38:32 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FEmotion confusing English words, Easter break, faun, fawn, mythical beings, Roman mythology, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Mr Tumnus, young deer, Bambi, Old English, Middle English, Old French Confusing Words for the Easter break: Faun vs. Fawn http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Confusing%5FWords%5Ffor%5Fthe%5FEaster%5Fbreak%3A%5FFaun%5Fvs%2E%5FFawn <p><strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p><strong>Fauns</strong> are mythical beings from Roman mythology. They are part man and part goat.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/faun">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>faun</strong> used in an example sentence: </p> <ul> <li> In <em>The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe</em>, the main character Lucy befriends a <strong>faun</strong> called Mr Tumnus. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list using the <strong>faun</strong>. </p> <p>A <strong>fawn</strong> is a young deer. The word is used to describe the light grey-brown colour of young deer. If you <strong>fawn</strong> over someone it means you are trying to gain their favour through excessive flattery or devotion. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/fawn">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>fawn</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>The film <em>Bambi</em> tells the story of a fawn growing up in the forest. </li> <li>He decorated the living room in <strong>fawn</strong>, blue, and moss green. </li> <li>She was embarrassed by the way the others <strong>fawned</strong> over her. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=fawn&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>fawn</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Faun</strong> comes from the Old English ‘fægnian’ which means ‘<em>rejoice, be glad, exult, applaud</em>’. The word was used in Middle English to describe to expressions of delight, particularly in relation to a dog wagging its tail. </p> <p><strong>Fawn</strong> comes from the Old French ’<em>faon, feon</em>’ meaning ‘<em>young animal</em>’ which comes from the Latin ‘<em>fetus</em>’ meaning ‘<em>a bringing forth; an offspring</em>’. The word was used to describe colour from 1881. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between faun and fawn? </strong></p> <p><strong>Fawn</strong> has the letters <strong>aw</strong> in it. Think of the sound someone might make upon seeing a young deer or when fawning over someone or something. Try saying the following sentence to yourself: ‘<strong>Aw</strong>, look at the baby deer learning to walk,’ he <strong>fawned</strong> when he saw the <strong>fawn</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 09 Apr 2018 10:33:17 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Confusing%5FWords%5Ffor%5Fthe%5FEaster%5Fbreak%3A%5FFaun%5Fvs%2E%5FFawn confusing English words, Easter, difference yolk and yoke, Happy Easter, egg yoke, egg yolk, spherical, albumen, Spellzone dictionary, fry eggs, break the yolk, soft boiled eggs, runny yolk, vocabulary lists, draft animals, Old English Commonly Confused Words: Yolk vs. Yoke http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FYolk%5Fvs%2E%5FYoke <p> Happy Easter! This week we have a themed post for our Commonly Confused Words series. <p>Make sure you don’t say egg <strong>yoke</strong> when you mean egg <strong>yolk</strong>! <p><strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p>The <strong>yolk</strong> is the yellow spherical part of an egg. It is surrounded by albumen which is white. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/yolk">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p> Here is <strong>yolk</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>Whenever he tried to fry eggs he always ended up accidentally breaking the <strong>yolk</strong>. </li> <li>I like soft-boiled eggs so I can dip my toast into the runny <strong>yolk</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=yolk&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>yolk</strong>.</p> <p>A <strong>yoke</strong> is a wooden restraint used to join two draft animals at the neck so they can work together. The word is also used metaphorically to refer to something that is oppressive. As a verb, <strong>yoke</strong> describes to the act of joining things together.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/yoke">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>yoke</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The bullocks pulled against the <strong>yoke</strong>. </li> <li>We fought against the <strong>yoke</strong> of tyranny. </li> <li>They <strong>yoked</strong> the horses and put them to work. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=yoke&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>yoke</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Yolk </strong>comes from the Old English ‘<em>geolca, geoloca</em>’ which means ‘<em>the yellow part</em>’ and in turn comes from ‘<em>geolu</em>’ which means ‘<em>yellow</em>’. The word used to be spelt ‘<em>yelk</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Yoke</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>geocian</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to join together</em>’. This comes from ‘<em>geoht</em>’ which means ‘<em>contrivance for fastening a pair of draft animals together</em>’ and comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘<em>yukam</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between yolk and yoke?</strong></p> <p>Think of a hen <strong>l</strong>aying an egg to help you remember yo<strong>l</strong>k has an <strong>l</strong> in it.</p> <p>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘The horses br<strong>oke</strong> free from their y<strong>oke</strong>’. </ul> </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Thu, 29 Mar 2018 08:37:59 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FYolk%5Fvs%2E%5FYoke tips for planning writing, writing English, improve your writing, improve writing in English, the art of planning, how to plan writing projects, English essay questions, English exams, idea generating methods, automatic writing, mind maps Top Tips for Planning Your Writing http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Top%5FTips%5Ffor%5FPlanning%5FYour%5FWriting <p>A few weeks ago, we shared <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_to_Help_You_Improve_Your_Writing.htm">five tips to help you improve your writing</a> and one of the pieces of advice we gave was to always begin with a plan. This week we’re delving into the art of planning. </p> <p>Here are our top tips: </p> <p><strong>Look Closely at Your Brief or Question </strong></p> <p>Before you start planning, take a moment to examine your brief or essay question. Copy the brief out by hand and highlight any key words. </p> <p>Pay attention to both the subject you are being asked to write about and how you are being asked to write about it. For example, you may be asked to summarise a subject, to compare one subject to another subject, to evaluate the positive and negative aspects of a subject, etc. It is surprisingly easy to go off on a tangent and end up answering a different question to the one you are being asked. In examination circumstances, this will lose you marks. </p> <p><strong>Map Out Your Ideas</strong></p> <p> Once you are clear about what you need to write about, it is time to get your ideas down on paper. We recommend spending at least fifteen minutes doing this. Different people will find different idea-generating methods useful. Here are some methods you can try to see what works for you: </p> <p><em>Automatic Writing<br /> </em>Automatic writing is a really useful way to come up with ideas when you are struggling to get started. Set a timer for five or ten minutes and write down everything that pops into your head. See if you can write without stopping. When your time is up, read over what you have written. While there is likely to be a few things that are irrelevant to your project, you will hopefully have a few ideas or discussion points to help you get started. </p> <p><em>Mind Maps </em><br /> A mind map helps organise ideas in a visual way. Begin by writing your question or brief in the centre of a page and then add branches outwards for each idea you want to discuss or argument you want to make. Draw further branches to add more information to each idea and use arrows to show how ideas connect to each other. Your mind map will you an overview of all the factors you should consider when you come to writing your piece and how they relate to each other. You can then use it to determine which ideas are the most pertinent to your brief. </p> <p><em>Pro/Con or For/Against Lists </em><br /> If your question requires you to evaluate the successes and failures of something, you might find it useful to make a table with two columns. List the successes on one side of the table and the failures on the other. The length of the lists in comparison to each other will give you an idea of how to structure your writing.</p> <p><strong>Plan Your Structure</strong></p> <p>The final step before you start writing is to organise your ideas into a coherent structure. Think about which ideas you feel are most relevant to your brief and then put them into an order. Try to balance arguments with their counterarguments in a clear and focussed way. Depending on the length of your project, you may want to outline structures for both the overall piece and the individual sections within it. Once you have a wider plan for the structure of your piece, add as much detail as you are comfortable with. Some people thrive with a just list of key words to prompt them, while others prefer planning on a paragraph-by-paragraph level. </p> <p>What methods have you found most useful for planning your writing? Let us know on Twitter or by leaving a comment below. </p> <p>Have a good week!</p> Wed, 21 Mar 2018 11:34:14 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Top%5FTips%5Ffor%5FPlanning%5FYour%5FWriting confusing English words, Spellzone, vocabulary lists, verb, noun, adjective, dictionary definition, example English sentences, tips to remember spellings, balmy, barmy, pleasant weather, mad, crazy, foolish Commonly Confused Words: Balmy vs. Barmy http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBalmy%5Fvs%2E%5FBarmy <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>The word <strong>balmy</strong> is an adjective used to describe mild and pleasant weather. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/balmy">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>balmy</strong> used in an example sentence: <ul> <li>The weather was unexpectedly <strong>balmy</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list using the word <strong>balmy</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Barmy</strong> means mad, crazy, or foolish. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/barmy">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>barmy</strong> used in an example sentence:</p> <ul> <li>It drives my sister <strong>barmy</strong> when I leave the television on standby instead of turning it off properly. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list using the word <strong>barmy</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p>The word <strong>balmy</strong> (from ‘<em>balm</em>’ + ‘<em>-y</em>’) dates back to around 1500 when it used to mean ‘<em>fragrant</em>’. The word took on its figurative meaning of ‘<em>soothing</em>’ and ‘<em>mild</em>’ in reference to breezes on hot days around 1600.</p> <p><strong>Barmy</strong> (from ‘<em>barm</em>’ meaning ‘<em>yeast</em>’ and ‘<em>-y</em>’) dates back to the 1530s when it meant ‘<em>frothing</em>’. From around 1600, the word was used figuratively to mean ‘<em>frothing with excitement</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between balmy and barmy?</strong></p> <ul> <li>B<strong>arm</strong>y has the word <strong>arm</strong> in it. </li> <li>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘His time in the<strong> army</strong> turned him b<strong>army</strong>’. </li> <li><strong>Balm</strong>y has the word <strong>balm</strong> in it. </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Thu, 15 Mar 2018 17:13:49 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBalmy%5Fvs%2E%5FBarmy English idioms, idioms about birds, birds, get your ducks in a row, kill two birds with one stone, count your chickens, swan song, spring chicken, sitting duck, pecking order, night owl, spread your wings, idioms Idioms about Birds: Part 2 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FBirds%3A%5FPart%5F2 <p> This week we’re looking at thirty more idioms about birds. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">here</a> to learn the thirty idioms we looked at last week.</p> <ol start="31"> <li><strong>night owl </strong>– someone who stays up late, someone who functions better at night </li> <li><strong>pecking order</strong> – the social hierarchy </li> <li><strong> rare bird</strong> – an unusual person </li> <li><strong>sitting duck </strong>– an easy target, someone who is vulnerable to target </li> <li><strong>spring chicken</strong> – a young person </li> <li><strong>swan song</strong> – a final work/performance before retirement/death </li> <li><strong>to chicken out </strong>– to opt out of doing something due to being frightened </li> <li><strong>to clip someone’s wings </strong>– to limit someone’s control/freedom </li> <li><strong>to count your chickens before they’re hatched</strong> – to depend on/make plans for something that you have not yet received/that has not yet been confirmed </li> <li><strong>to eat crow</strong> – to be humiliated, to admit defeat, to admit you are mistaken </li> <li><strong> to eat like a bird</strong> – to eat very little</li> <li><strong>to fly the coop </strong>– to escape </li> <li><strong>to get your ducks in a row </strong>– to put your affairs in order</li> <li><strong> to kill the goose that lays the golden egg </strong>– to destroy a valuable source of income </li> <li><strong>to kill two birds with one stone </strong>– to accomplish two objectives at once </li> <li><strong> to look like the cat that swallowed the canary</strong> – to look very pleased/satisfied with oneself </li> <li><strong> to play chicken</strong> – to play a game in which the first person to withdraw from a frightening or dangerous situation loses </li> <li><strong>to quit cold turkey </strong>– to abruptly and completely give something up </li> <li><strong>to ruffle someone’s feathers </strong>– to annoy or upset someone </li> <li><strong>to rule the roost </strong>– to be in charge </li> <li><strong> to run around like a chicken with its head cut off </strong>– to run around frantically and aimlessly </li> <li><strong>to spread your wings </strong>– to become independent/to pursue new interests and activities</li> <li><strong>to take someone under your wing </strong>– to take someone into your protective care, to take someone under your guidance </li> <li><strong> to talk turkey </strong>– to discuss something frankly </li> <li><strong>to try out your wings</strong> – to independently do something that you have recently learned/received a qualification in </li> <li><strong>to watch someone/something like a hawk</strong> – to watch someone/something very closely</li> <li><strong> to wing it </strong>– to improvise </li> <li><strong>ugly duckling </strong>– someone who is considered ugly or plain as a child but grows up to be beautiful </li> <li><strong>what’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander</strong> – what is good/appropriate in one case is also good/appropriate in the other case in question </li> <li><strong> wild goose chase</strong> – a hopeless search for something that is likely unattainable</li> </ol> <p>If you found this post useful, why not take a look at some of our other articles about idioms?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Sun, 04 Mar 2018 10:53:32 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FBirds%3A%5FPart%5F2 English idioms, idioms about birds, birds, a bird in the hand, a little bird told me, as bald as a coot, completely bald, as dead as a dodo, as free as a bird, bird brain, dead duck, early bird, idioms Idioms about Birds: Part 1 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FBirds%3A%5FPart%5F1 <ol> <li><strong>a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush</strong> – it is better to be content with what you have than to risk losing it in the attempt to seek more</li> <li><strong>a little bird(y) told me</strong> – told by a secret informant </li> <li><strong>albatross around your neck</strong> – something that makes you feel guilty or frustrated, something that prevents success</li> <li><strong>as bald as a coot</strong> – completely bald </li> <li><strong>as crazy as a loon </strong>– crazy</li> <li><strong> as dead as a dodo</strong> – totally dead, extinct</li> <li><strong>as free as a bird</strong> – totally free, carefree</li> <li><strong>as mad as a wet hen </strong>– angry </li> <li><strong>as scarce as hens’ teeth</strong> – non-existent</li> <li><strong>as the crow flies</strong> – in a straight line </li> <li><strong>bird brain</strong> – an insult meaning stupid </li> <li><strong>birds of a feather flock together</strong> – people who have the same outlook/tastes/interests will be found in each other’s company</li> <li><strong>birds-eye view</strong> – view from above </li> <li><strong>chicken and egg situation</strong> – a situation where it is impossible to agree which of two connected things existed first </li> <li><strong>chicken feed</strong> – a ridiculously small amount of money </li> <li><strong>chicken-livered </strong>– cowardly </li> <li><strong>chickens come home to roost</strong> – words or actions which have an unexpected consequence </li> <li><strong>cock of the walk</strong> – a person who dominates within a group </li> <li><strong>cock-and-bull story</strong> – a far-fetched and unlikely story</li> <li><strong>dead duck</strong> – someone or something with little chance of success </li> <li><strong>duck soup</strong> – a very easy task </li> <li><strong>eagle eye</strong> – a close watch </li> <li><strong>early bird </strong>– someone who arrives or begins early </li> <li><strong>feather in one’s cap</strong> – an honour, an achievement to be proud of</li> <li><strong>for the birds</strong> – not worthy of consideration </li> <li><strong>gone goose</strong> – someone (or something) who (that) is beyond hope </li> <li><strong>in fine feather</strong> – in good humour/form/health</li> <li><strong> like a duck to water </strong>– quickly and easily, like a natural </li> <li><strong>lovely weather for ducks</strong> – rainy weather </li> <li><strong>neither fish nor foul</strong> – difficult to identify/categorise </li> </ol> <p>If you found this post useful, why not take a look at some of our other articles about idioms?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Mon, 26 Feb 2018 17:48:15 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FBirds%3A%5FPart%5F1 tips to expand your vocabulary, new English words, Buzzfeed, English podcasts, Spellzone, spelling words, word log, learn new words, learning spelling, English vocabulary, syllables, mnemonics, focus on spelling memorising vocabulary, synonym Three Tips to Help You Expand Your Vocabulary http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Three%5FTips%5Fto%5FHelp%5FYou%5FExpand%5FYour%5FVocabulary <ol> <li><strong>Expose yourself to as many new words as possible </strong><br /> If you want to expand your vocabulary, it is important to actively expose yourself to unfamiliar words. One way of doing this is by reading as much as possible. As long as you focus on building your vocabulary, you don’t necessarily have to read books. From food packets, to road signs, to Buzzfeed, we each read a huge variety of words as we go about our day to day lives. We also expose ourselves to words by watching television and online videos, by listening to the radio or podcasts, and in conversations. <br /> <br /> Try to be conscious of the information you are processing. When you come across a new word, see if you can work out its meaning through the context it is used in. Does it sound like or is it spelt like any other words you know? Note down the words and look them up in the dictionary when you have a free moment. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Set yourself goals and keep a word log </strong><br /> Whether you choose to learn three new words a day or ten new words a week, set yourself a goal and stick to it. It is also useful to keep a log of the new words you learn. As well as helping to track your progress, the act of writing down words will help fix them in your memory. <br /> <br /> Here at Spellzone, we recommend <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Spelling_Using_the_Senses.htm">learning spelling using as many senses as possible</a>. You can use the same techniques when building your vocabulary. As you learn new words, pay attention to the sounds of the syllables and the shapes of the letters. Try and make a link between the new word and another word you already know. It might also help to come up with a visual image to link the word to as a memory trigger. While our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">tips for creating mnemonics</a> focus on spelling, many of the methods can be applied to learning and memorising vocabulary as well. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Practise, practise, practise! </strong>(<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">Practice, practice, practice! in the US</a>)<br /> The best thing you can do to expand your vocabulary is practise using new words as often as you can. <br /> <br /> After you look up a word, try and come up with three different sentences with it in. This is especially useful if a word has multiple meanings. You may want to copy out the definition of the word in your log book and then write your three sentences underneath it. <br /> <br /> Look for opportunities to use new words in conversation. It might help to ask a friend or family member to practise with you – they may even end up improving their own vocabulary along the way! <br /> <br /> If a new word is a synonym of a word you already know and use regularly, commit to saying or writing the new word in place of the old one until you are comfortable and confident using it. Soon it will become a part of your vocabulary and you will find yourself using it without thinking about it. </li> </ol> <p>Have a good week! </p> Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:03:26 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Three%5FTips%5Fto%5FHelp%5FYou%5FExpand%5FYour%5FVocabulary Shakespeare in Love, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, music be the food of love, Love is blind, The Merchant’s Tale, the Bard, The Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare in Love http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shakespeare%5Fin%5FLove <p> Many English words, idioms, and expressions were made popular by their appearance in the works of <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_folder.cfm?Folder=190">William Shakespeare</a>. Here are four expressions in which Shakespeare comments on the nature of love: </p> <p><strong>1. If music be the food of love, play on</strong></p> <p>This expression is quoting Duke Orsino from <em>Twelfth Night</em>. Frustrated by his unsuccessful courtship of Countess Olivia, he says:</p> <p align="center">‘If music be the food of love, play on; <br /> Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, <br /> The appetite may sicken, and so die.<br /> That strain again! it had a dying fall: <br /> O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet sound, <br /> That breathes upon a bank of violets, <br /> Stealing and giving odour! Enough; no more:<br /> 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.<br /> O spirit of love! how quick and fresh art thou, <br /> That, notwithstanding thy capacity <br /> Receiveth as the sea, nought enters there, <br /> Of what validity and pitch soe'er, <br /> But falls into abatement and low price, <br /> Even in a minute: so full of shapes is fancy <br /> That it alone is high fantastical.’ </p> <p><strong>2. Love is blind </strong></p> <p>Though this expression first appeared in Chaucer’s <em>The Merchant’s Tale</em>, around a hundred and fifty years before Shakespeare birth, the phrase pops up in many of the Bard’s plays too. </p> <p>In <em>The Merchant of Venice</em>, Jessica says: </p> <p align="center">‘Here, catch this casket; it is worth the pains. <br /> I am glad 'tis night, you do not look on me, <br /> For I am much ashamed of my exchange: <br /> But love is blind and lovers cannot see <br /> The pretty follies that themselves commit; <br /> For if they could, Cupid himself would blush <br /> To see me thus transformed to a boy.’ </p> <p>The phrase also appears in <em>Two Gentlemen of Verona and Henry V</em>. </p> <p><strong>3. Star-crossed lovers </strong></p> <p><em>Romeo and Juliet</em>, perhaps the most famous romantic tale of all, opens with the following prologue which tells us what the story is going to be about: </p> <p align="center">‘Two households, both alike in dignity <br /> (In fair Verona, where we lay our scene), <br /> From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, <br /> Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. <br /> From forth the fatal loins of these two foes <br /> A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, <br /> Whose misadventured piteous overthrows <br /> Doth with their death bury their parents' strife. <br /> The fearful passage of their death-marked love <br /> And the continuance of their parents' rage, <br /> Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, <br /> Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage -<br /> The which, if you with patient ears attend, <br /> What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.’ </p> <p><strong>Star-crossed</strong> means inevitable, thwarted by bad luck, doomed by the stars. By telling us the story at the beginning of the play, Shakespeare suggests that there is nothing his characters could have done to prevent the tragedy that befalls them. </p> <p><strong>4. The course of true love never did run smooth </strong></p> <p><em>A Midsummer Night’s Dream</em> is a comedy about the complicated and often messy nature of love. Lysander loves Hermia who has been promised to someone else. He tries to reassure her by saying:</p> <p align="center">‘Ay me! for aught that I could ever read, <br /> Could ever hear by tale or history, <br /> The course of true love never did run smooth; <br /> But, either it was different in blood,--‘. </p> <p>Happy Valentine’s Day!</p> Wed, 14 Feb 2018 10:46:00 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shakespeare%5Fin%5FLove writing English tips, improve my writing, writing style, academic essays, writing a blog post, writing tone and style, letter of complaint, letter to a friend, American English spelling and grammar conventions, redundant expressions, meaning of English Five Tips to Help You Improve Your Writing http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Fto%5FHelp%5FYou%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting <p><strong> 1) Why are you writing and who are you writing for? </strong></p> <p>Before you start writing, it is important to ask yourself these two questions and adapt your writing style accordingly. This is because the purpose and intended audience of an academic essay is, for example, is very different to that of a blog post. Similarly, the tone and style of a letter of complaint is very different to that of a letter to a friend, and both of these are different to the tone and style of an email or text message. </p> <p>If you are writing for university coursework or for a publication, make sure you are aware of any style guides you should follow. The whereabouts of your audience may also affect how you choose to write something. If you are writing for an American audience, for example, you may wish to use American English spelling and grammar conventions. </p> <p>If you keep the answers to these two questions in mind throughout the writing process, it will help avoid wasting time and words on irrelevant tangents. </p> <p><strong>2) Plan before you begin </strong></p> <p>Another way to make sure you don’t go off topic in your writing is by beginning with a plan. List the key points you want to make and organise your information into a clear structure. This will help make sure your writing flows well and that your message is communicated clearly. </p> <p><strong>3) Clarity, Clarity, Clarity! </strong></p> <p>Don’t forget that while you know a lot about the subject you’re writing about, your reader may not. </p> <p>As you write your piece, ask yourself why you are including each piece of information and what the information will add to your reader’s understanding of the subject. It is important to make sure your reader is neither left without enough information to understand the point you are trying to make nor overloaded with so much information that your point gets lost. </p> <p>You can help guide your reader through your writing by making it clear how each point relates to the one before and after it. Think carefully about the order of your sentences and how this affects the way you are communicating information. Depending on your audience and the writing style you have chosen, it may be appropriate to use headings to break down information. </p> <p><strong>4) Don’t use redundant expressions </strong></p> <p>If your writing contains redundant expressions, a reader might think that you do not fully understand the meaning of the words you are using or that you are choosing them sloppily. While it might be tempting to use a longer or more unusual word because it might make you seem more knowledgeable about a subject, your writing will have quite the opposite effect if you don’t use the word correctly. </p> <p>We recommend always looking up a word in the dictionary if you are unsure of what it means and removing it from your writing if it means the same thing as another word you have already used. Don’t forget, it is always better to use fewer words and make your point clearly than it is to use more and make it convolutedly. </p> <p>You can read more about redundant expressions <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Improve_Your_Writing_by_Avoiding_Redundant_Expressions.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>5) Be Consistent </strong></p> <p>Once you have chosen an appropriate writing style, make sure you stick to it. As you write you will have to make a series of decisions, for example: </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Forming_Plurals.htm">Should I use the plural ‘cacti’ or the plural ‘cactuses’? </a></li> <li>How should I format the date? </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">Should I use an Oxford comma? </a></li> </ul> <p>Be intentional as you make these decisions and make sure you are consistent throughout your writing. If you choose to use the Latin plural ‘cacti’ in one instance, don’t later use the English plural ‘cactuses’. Consistency is key!</p> Fri, 09 Feb 2018 15:40:15 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Fto%5FHelp%5FYou%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting English language, idioms, figurative meaning, word definitions, plain English, common English, bite the bullet, American Civil War, Indian Rebellion, British Army, Hindu soldiers, Muslim soldiers, caught red handed, poaching, keep at bay Three Popular Idioms and their Origin Stories http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Three%5FPopular%5FIdioms%5Fand%5Ftheir%5FOrigin%5FStories <p>One of the reasons <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_reasons_why_English_spelling_is_so_difficult.htm">English is so difficult to learn</a> is because it is a language full of idioms. An idiom is a combination of words that has a figurative meaning separate from the actual definitions of the words used. There are an estimated 25,000 idioms in the English language.</p> <p>Here on the blog, in one of our regular features, we translate popular idioms into plain English. Today we are going to look at three common English idioms and how and why they came to be associated with their figurative meanings. </p> <p><strong>1) Bite the Bullet </strong><br /> If someone is described as biting the bullet, it means they are finally doing a difficult or unpleasant task they’ve been putting off.</p> <p>One theory behind the origin of this phrase is that soldiers, in the days before anaesthetics were effective or readily available, would bite down on bullets to help them tolerate pain. However, the most frequently cited origin of the phrase is during the American Civil War which began in 1861 and at least ten years after military surgeons began using ether and chloroform to anaesthetise patients. </p> <p>Another theory is that the phrase originated during the Indian Rebellion of 1857 when native Indian fighters, recruited by the British Army, were using rifles with greased paper cartridges which needed to be bitten to release powder. Hindu soldiers were concerned that the paper was greased with cow fat while Muslim soldiers worried that it was greased with pig fat. It is said that phrase comes from the expectation that soldiers ignored their religious concerns and ‘<em>bit the bullet</em>’ anyway.</p> <p>However, the phrase appears before both the American Civil War and the Indian Rebellion in Francis Grose’s 1796 <em>A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue</em>. Its true origin remains a mystery. </p> <p><strong>2) Caught Red-Handed</strong><br /> If someone is caught red-handed, it means that they are caught in the act of doing something they shouldn’t be doing. They phrase come from the idea of having blood on one’s hands after committing murder or poaching. The phrase was first used in the <em>Scottish Acts of Parliament of James I </em>in 1432 and has appeared in many legal documents since. </p> <p><strong>3) Keep at Bay</strong><br /> If you keep something (or someone) at bay, it means you are keeping it (or them) from approaching or having an effect. </p> <p>It might seem that this phrase has nautical origins; the idea of keeping a ship at bay and not allowing it to enter port makes sense. In fact, the story behind this phrase is completely different. </p> <p>The phrase entered English via the Old French ‘<em>abbay</em>’ which means ‘<em>barking</em>’ and evolved first into ‘<em>aba</em>y’ and then ‘<em>at bay</em>’. In the fourteenth century, the term ‘at a bay’ was used to describe hunting hounds that were barking. The phrase also came to describe animals which were in a standoff with a barking dog that was intent on killing them. The first recorded use of the phrase in its figurative meaning was in the eighteenth century.</p> <p>If you found this post interesting, you can read more about idiom origins <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/American_Idioms.htm">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween-cc_Three_everyday_idioms_and_their_terrifying_origins.htm">here</a>. You may also find our idiom translation articles useful: <br /> </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Idioms for Winter</a></li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="https://www.phrases.org.uk/">The Phrase Finder</a></p> Tue, 30 Jan 2018 11:24:08 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Three%5FPopular%5FIdioms%5Fand%5Ftheir%5FOrigin%5FStories confusing English words, moot, mute, argument, debate, insignificant, irrelevant, Spellzone, moot point, vocabulary lists, verb, muffling, noun, adjective, dictionary definition,example English sentences, old English, English spelling, old French, rhyming Commonly Confused Words: Moot vs. Mute http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FMoot%5Fvs%2E%5FMute <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>If something is <strong>moot</strong>, it is open to argument or debate. <strong>Moot</strong> can also be used to describe something that is insignificant or irrelevant.Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/moot">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>moot</strong> used in an example sentence: <ul> <li> It was a <strong>moot</strong> point. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list using the word <strong>moot</strong>.</p> <p>The verb <strong>mute</strong> describes the act of muffling or silencing a noise. As a noun, <strong>mute</strong> is used to refer to both someone who is unable to speak and something used to soften the sound of an instrument. As an adjective, the word describes someone who is unable to speak.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/mute">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>mute</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He <strong>muted</strong> the television while the commercials were on. </li> <li>The man was as silent as a <strong>mute</strong>.</li> <li>She stood there, <strong>mute</strong>, while as she processed what her friend was saying. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=mute&Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>mute</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Moot</strong> derives from the Old English ‘<em>motian</em>’ which means ‘<em>to meet, talk, discuss</em>’. The word has been used in English since the twelfth century.</p> <p><strong>Mute</strong> first entered English as ‘<em>mewet</em>’ in the late fourteenth century from the Old French ‘<em>muet</em>’ meaning ‘<em>dumb, mute</em>’. By the 1570s the word was used to describe a ‘<em>stage actor in a dumb show</em>’ and by the 1610s to a ‘<em>person who does not speak</em>’. The word was first used in reference something that <strong>muted</strong> a musical instrument in 1811 and later to describe the act of muffling a sound in 1861.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between moot and mute?</strong></p> <p>Use rhyming words to help you remember the spellings of each word:</p> <ul> <li><strong>moot</strong> rhymes with boot </li> <li><strong>mute</strong> rhymes with cute. </ul> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 30 Jan 2018 10:54:06 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FMoot%5Fvs%2E%5FMute Janus Words, January, the god of beginnings and transitions, New Year, English words, contradictory meanings, contronyms, auto antonyms, apology, buckle, cleave, custom, hold up, literally, model, overlook, English teachers, quiddity, temper, short trip t More Janus Words http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=More%5FJanus%5FWords <p> The month January takes its name from <a href="http://goarticles.com/article/The-Roman-God-Janus-and-Auto-Antonyms/5069113/">Janus</a>, the god of beginnings and transitions (and so it is appropriate that January is the month that marks the transition into the New Year). Janus is usually depicted with two heads – one looking back into the past, and the other looking forward to the future.</p> <p>Last January we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Janus_Words.htm">20 Janus words</a>. A Janus word is a word with contradictory meanings. These words are also known as contronyms and auto antonyms. </p> <p>Here are some more examples of Janus words: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Apology</strong>: an expression of regret for causing someone trouble, a formal written defence of something <ul> <li>I owe you an apology for using your computer without asking first. </li> <li>She wrote an apology for the hunting ban. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Bill</strong>: a payment, an invoice/to invoice <ul> <li>We argued over who would pay the restaurant bill. </li> <li>They forgot to bill us for our dessert. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Buckle</strong>: to fasten, to fold/collapse <ul> <li>She buckled her belt. </li> <li>The bench buckled under the weight of the bags. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Cleave</strong>: to stick, to sever/split <ul> <li>He was so nervous his tongue cleaved to the roof of his mouth. </li> <li>She cleaved wood for the fire. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Custom</strong>: a common/traditional practice, something that is bespoke/made-to-order <ul> <li>One Christmas custom is to exchange gifts. </li> <li>He bought her a custom guitar for Christmas. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Hold up</strong>: to support, to obstruct <ul> <li>We held up the frame where we wanted to hang it to see how it would look. </li> <li>I held my parents up while my sister could sneaked out. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Literally</strong>: actually, figuratively <ul> <li>The teacher hadn’t meant for his students to take him literally when he told them he expected them to spend every minute of the day studying. </li> <li>‘I expect you to be revising literally every minute of every day,’ her mother told her. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Model</strong>: an excellent example of a particular quality, a copy or representation of something <ul> <li>The new building was a model of innovative architecture. </li> <li>They asked for a model, to scale, of the planned building. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Off</strong>: activated, deactivated <ul> <li>The alarm went off. </li> <li>The alarm was off. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Overlook</strong>: to fail to notice/to ignore, to supervise <ul> <li>He was overlooked for a promotion. </li> <li>She overlooked several large projects and managed a team of fifty. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Put out</strong>: to extinguish, toproduce and circulate <ul> <li> ‘Don’t forget to put out the campfire before you go to sleep,’ she warned. </li> <li>Ms Thomas, the English teacher, supervised the students who put out to school newspaper. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Quiddity</strong>: the inherent nature of something, a peculiar or distinctive feature <ul> <li>His work explores the quiddity of human experience. </li> <li>She found his quirks and quiddities attractive. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Temper</strong>: to strengthen, to soften/dilute/neutralise <ul> <li>They gave us a tempered steel pan as a house-warming gift.</li> <li>The hot sun was tempered by a light breeze. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Trip</strong>: a journey, a stumble <ul> <li>We’re taking a short trip to Europe. </li> <li>He tripped over his untied shoelace. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>Have a good week!</p> Mon, 15 Jan 2018 15:41:11 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=More%5FJanus%5FWords improve your spelling, Spelling Ability Test, spelling course, English spelling test, baseline spelling score, interactive spelling test, spelling, word lists, Listen and Spell, spelling games, printable worksheets, vocabulary lists Make the Most of Spellzone in 2018 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Make%5Fthe%5FMost%5Fof%5FSpellzone%5Fin%5F2018 <p> Is your New Year’s resolution to improve your spelling? Here are three tips to help you make the most of your Spellzone subscription:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Take the Spellzone Spelling Ability Test </strong><br /> Our Spelling Ability Test will help you work out a base spelling level and provide you with a tailored version of the course depending on your results and any gaps in your knowledge - your personal Course Pathway. <br /> <br /> You will be tested on the spellings of a series of words which will get progressively more difficult. Each word that appears in the test relates to a course unit and the test will finish once you spell a set percentage of words incorrectly. You will then be given a baseline Spellzone Score to help you track your progress and achievements. You will be retested after every eight course units completed and the test results will tell you if you need to retake any units and which units to move onto next.<br /> <br /> You can find out more about the Spelling Ability Test <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Spelling_Ability_Test.htm">here</a>. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Work through your personal Course Pathway </strong><br /> Once we have worked out your personal Course Pathway, you will be ready to work though the Spellzone course. The Spellzone course units will take you through the various English spelling rules and their exceptions. At the end of each unit, there is an interactive test. <br /> <br /> As long as you have your username and password, you can work through your Course Pathway on any device that connects to the internet. This means you that you can access your account from home even if it has been set up for you by your school, university, or workplace. If your New Year’s resolution is to work on your spelling, we recommend using Spellzone as regularly as your schedule allows. Challenge yourself to study your Course Pathway for a set number of minutes each day or commit to completing a set number of units each month. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Personalise Spellzone to Suit Your Needs </strong><br /> The Spellzone word list feature is a great way to adapt Spellzone to suit your needs. You can use all word lists with two testing methods: <em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em> and <em>Listen and Spell </em>as well in six spelling games and as printable worksheets. You can find out more about how to use these to improve your spelling <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Tests_to_Make_Sure_Your_Spelling_is_in_Top_Shape_for_Exam_Time.htm">here</a>.<br /> <br /> While we already have a huge collection of existing word lists – in a wide array of subjects – the best way to make sure you’re practising the vocabulary most relevant to your subject or field is to create your own lists. <br /> <br /> The following word lists, for example, are very useful for students who are studying Shakespeare: <ul> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5408">Characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5407">Characters in Romeo and Juliet </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5406">Characters in Macbeth</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5405">Characters in The Tempest </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5404">Characters in King Lear</a></li> </ul> </li> </ol> <blockquote> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/index.cfm">here</a> to find out more about Spellzone word lists and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Using_Spellzone_Word_Lists_as_Part_of_Your_Exam_Preparation">here</a> to learn how to create your own. </p> </blockquote> <p>We hope these tips will help you make the most of Spellzone in 2018 – please let us know if you have any questions. Happy New Year! </p> Tue, 09 Jan 2018 11:12:50 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Make%5Fthe%5FMost%5Fof%5FSpellzone%5Fin%5F2018