Spelling English spelling blog http://www.spellzone.com/ Information about all things regarding spelling, English language, English teaching, language help and learning and foreign languages English, spelling, language Spelling English spelling course http://www.spellzone.com/images/spellzone_name_on_small.jpg http://www.spellzone.com/ apostrophe errors, apostrophes, punctuation marks, tips for using apostrophes, apostrophe to form a plural, plurals, abbreviations, possessive pronoun, contraction, possessive forms, Waterstones, Nando’s, Tom and Jerry, spelling and grammar Apostrophe Errors http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Apostrophe%5FErrors <p>The apostrophe is perhaps one of the most-often misused punctuation marks. In one of our previous blog posts, we shared <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">ten tips for using apostrophes correctly</a>. This week, we are going to take a look at some of the most common mistakes people make while using apostrophes so that you can avoid making them too.</p> <p><strong>Never use an apostrophe to form a plural </strong></p> <p>One place where people often add unnecessary apostrophes is in plurals. You <em>never</em> need an apostrophe to form a plural. This includes the plurals for abbreviations, letters, numbers, spans of years, and surnames. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>cars</strong> not <em>car’s </em></li> <li><strong> ifs and buts</strong> not <em>if’s and but’s </em></li> <li><strong>DVDs</strong> not <em>DVD’s</em> </li> <li><strong>Ps and Qs</strong> not <em>P’s and Q’s</em> </li> <li><strong>9s </strong>not <em>9’s </em></li> <li><strong>the 1970s</strong> not <em>the 1970’s</em></li> <li><strong>the Smiths</strong> not <em>the Smith’s </em></li> </ul> <p>To learn more about how to form plurals correctly, click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Forming_Plurals.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>Never use an apostrophe in a possessive pronoun </strong></p> <p>As apostrophes are used to denote if someone or something possesses someone or something else, it is easy to get confused when it comes to possessive pronouns. A pronoun should <em>never</em> use an apostrophe to indicate possession. </p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li><strong>theirs</strong> not <em>their’s</em></li> <li><strong>yours</strong> not <em>your’s </em></li> </ul> <p>However, an apostrophe is necessary if you are using a pronoun as part of contraction. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>he’s </strong>not <em>hes</em> (he is) </li> <li><strong> they’re</strong> not <em>theyre </em>(they are) </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">here</a> to learn more about contractions and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Pronouns.htm">here</a> to learn more about pronouns. </p> <p><strong>Be careful with the following possessive forms </strong></p> <p>When multiple people or things are in possession, only the last name that is listed requires an apostrophe. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Mum and Dad’s house</strong> not <em>Mum’s and Dad’s house </em></li> <li><strong>Tom and Jerry’s ongoing rivalry</strong> not <em>Tom’s and Jerry’s ongoing rivalry </em></li> </ul> <p>If a surname ends in the letter S, the apostrophe should come <em>after</em> the S. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong> the Smiths’ house</strong> not the Smith’s house </li> </ul> <p>Some organisations choose to drop apostrophes from their brand name even though using one is grammatically correct. When writing brand names, you should follow the organisation’s lead. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Waterstones</strong> not <em>Waterstone’s </em></li> <li><strong>Nando’s</strong> not <em>Nandos</em></li> </ul> <p> If you are interested in learning more about punctuation, you can find some of our other articles <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grammar_and_Punctuation_Tips.htm">here</a>. </p> <p>What aspects of spelling and grammar do you struggle with the most? Let us know if there are any other topics you would like us to cover! </p> Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:35:43 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Apostrophe%5FErrors English spelling, spelling using senses, learn to spell, practise spelling, how to remember spellings, learn spelling, learning words, correct spelling, look, say, cover, write, check, mnemonic, syllables, pronouncing words Spelling Using the Senses http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spelling%5FUsing%5Fthe%5FSenses <p>Here are Spellzone, we encourage our students to learn spelling using as many senses as they can. By learning in this way, we are able to connect as many associations as possible with the spelling of a particular word. These associations should help trigger our memories when we are trying to remember spellings.</p> <p>So how we can be aware of the five senses when learn spelling? </p> <p><strong>SIGHT</strong> </p> <p>When learning a word, <strong>LOOK</strong> closely at it. Then cover it up and try to remember how the letters are positioned on the page. Picture your own handwriting and the way the letters look beside each other. </p> <p>Sometimes if you spell a word in a few different ways, one of the spellings will <strong>LOOK</strong> more familiar than the others. It can be useful to have scrap of paper to hand to do this on – often it is possible to tell which word ‘just looks right’. For example toylet vs. toilet or tois vs. toys. </p> <p>It is also possible that the words you are looking for may be close to hand, perhaps on a worksheet or in a dictionary, on a billboard or on a book cover. If you can recognise the shape of words, you will be able to use these aids to help you find the correct spelling. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Tests_to_Make_Sure_Your_Spelling_is_in_Top_Shape_for_Exam_Time.htm">here</a> to learn more about the <em><strong>Look</strong>, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em> method of testing.</p> <p>You can also utilise how a word <strong>LOOKS</strong> on the page to create a mnemonic – find out more <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>SOUND </strong></p> <p>When you use the <em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em> method, it is also useful to pay attention to the <strong>SOUND</strong> of a word. Break down each syllable as you say a word – this might give you a clue about how to spell it. </p> <p>The <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/index.cfm">Spellzone dictionary</a> also allows you to listen to how a word is pronounced. Search for the word you are looking for and click on the speaker icon to hear it. Pay attention to how the <strong>SOUND</strong> of the word is similar or different to the spelling. </p> <p>If you are focussing on the sounds of words, you might find it useful to use rhymes to create mnemonics. Find out more <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>TOUCH </strong></p> <p>Muscle memory can play an important part in learning spelling. When practicing the word, both writing it and typing it out can be helpful. <strong>FEEL</strong> how the pen moves on the page, or where the letters are on the keyboard. After a while your hands will train themselves to automatically create the shapes of certain words. </p> <p>You may also find it useful to notice how your mouth and tongue moves when pronouncing particular words. Associating these movements with spelling patterns may help trigger your memory. </p> <p><strong>SMELL AND TASTE </strong></p> <p>While, for most people, these two senses won’t be of much use when it comes to learning spellings, there are some who might find that certain smells and tastes trigger certain memories. Others might reward themselves with a sweet treat after each word they spell correctly… any opportunity for chocolate is surely good for learning, right? </p> <p>Have a great week!</p> </body> Mon, 18 Sep 2017 11:38:49 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spelling%5FUsing%5Fthe%5FSenses elicit meaning, illicit meaning, emotions, opinions, Spellzone, dictionary definition, example sentences, huge media interest, vocabulary lists, adjective, morality, law, convention, example English sentences, Latin, English, Old French spelling tricks Commonly Confused Words: Elicit vs. Illicit http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FElicit%5Fvs%2E%5FIllicit <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> The word <strong>elicit </strong>means ‘<em>to call forth</em>’ or ‘<em>to draw out</em>’. It is used to describe the calling forth of emotions, opinions, responses etc. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/elicit">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>elicit</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>The museum <strong>elicited</strong> huge media interest. </li> <li>She tried to <strong>elicit</strong> a smile from her crying friend. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list including the word <strong>elicit</strong>.</p> <p>The adjective <strong>illicit</strong> is used to describe activity which is done in spite of accepted morality, law, or convention.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/illicit">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>illicit</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The area was known for the presence of <strong>illicit</strong> activities. </li> <li>The company was fined for <strong>illicit</strong> conduct. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=illicit&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>illicit</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Elicit </strong>dates back to the 1640s and comes from the Latin ‘<em>elicitus</em>’ which means ‘<em>draw out, draw forth</em>’. The word is made up of <em>‘ex-</em>’ meaning ‘<em>out</em>’ and ‘<em>-licere</em>’, a form of ‘<em>lacere</em>’, meaning ‘<em>to entice, lure, deceive</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Illicit </strong>dates back to around 1500 and comes from the Old French ‘<em>illicite</em>’ meaning ‘<em>unlawful, forbidden</em>’, which in turn comes from the Latin ‘<em>illicitus</em>’ meaning ‘<em>not allowed, unlawful, illegal</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>The word <strong>illicit</strong> refers to <strong>illegal</strong> activities. Both words begin with the letters <strong>ill</strong>. </li> <li>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘He <strong>el</strong>icited advice from <strong>El</strong>eanor.’ </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 04 Sep 2017 14:22:38 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FElicit%5Fvs%2E%5FIllicit punctuation, commas, clauses, semi colons, synonyms, suffixes, root word, abbreviations, apostrophe, full stop, contractions, grammar mistakes, plurals, nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, determiners, pronouns, prepositions Grammar and Punctuation Tips http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Grammar%5Fand%5FPunctuation%5FTips <p>The summer holidays are coming to an end and if you’re not back at school yet, you will be soon. To help you prepare, we’ve compiled a list of our favourite posts on grammar and punctuation.</p> <ol> <li>Commas are confusing, but luckily we’re here to help. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commas_and_Clauses.htm">here</a> to learn how to use commas to separate clauses, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">here</a> to learn how to use commas as part of a list, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Use%5FCommas%5Fin%5FDirect%5FSpeech">here</a> to learn how to use commas in direct speech. </li> <li>If you think commas are difficult to use, you’ll probably think semi colons are worse. This punctuation mark is used to denote a break that has more emphasis than a comma but is less final than a full stop. In <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm">this article</a>, we look at the two common circumstances in which it is appropriate to use a semicolon. </li> <li>We’ve already looked at how to use commas in direct speech, but what about the other rules for correctly formatting dialogue? Should you single or double speech marks? What punctuation marks should you use? Find out <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Formatting_Speech.htm">here</a>. You can also practise spelling synonyms for the words ‘said’ <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=3615">here</a>. </li> <li>All sentences have a subject and many also have an object. Knowing which of the two you're dealing with can help you with other aspects of writing. Find out more <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">here</a>. </li> <li> A suffix is added to the end of a word to change its meaning. Sometimes, when you add a suffix, the root word has to be changed slightly first. Find five tips for adding suffixes <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Adding_Suffixes.htm">here</a>. </li> <li>Capitals letters can be more complicated that you might think. While you can sometimes get away without using capital letters in informal writing (like emails or text messages), it is important to learn how to use them correctly for formal writing (like essays and business correspondence). Learn how to use them <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">here</a>. </li> <li>Shortening words can be a tricky business. Should you capitalise an abbreviation? Does it need an apostrophe? What about full stop after it? In <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Forming_Abbreviations.htm">this article</a> we share top tips for forming abbreviations. A contraction is a particular type of abbreviation and in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">this article</a> we look further at common contractions and how to format them correctly. </li> <li> One use of the apostrophe is to denote missing letters in contractions. Find out about the other ways to use this confusing punctuation mark <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">here</a>. </li> <li>One of the most common grammar mistakes people make is using an apostrophe when forming a plural. Make sure you don’t fall into this trap and learn how to form plurals correctly <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Forming_Plurals.htm">here</a>. </li> <li> The term ‘word class’ is used to describe the way a particular word functions in a sentence and there are nine main word classes. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">here</a> to learn about nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs; <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_2.htm">here</a> to learn about conjunctions, determiners, exclamations, pronouns, and prepositions; and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Pronouns.htm">here</a> to learn about the different types of pronouns. </li> </ol> <p>Are there any grammar-related topics that you would like us to cover? Let us know! </p> Wed, 30 Aug 2017 10:32:28 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Grammar%5Fand%5FPunctuation%5FTips English words said wrong, English words mispronounced, English language, English spelling, spelling, pronunciation, hard to pronounce English words, British spelling, American spelling, Yorkshire company, British English, American English, phonetic recor Words People Often Say Wrong http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5FPeople%5FOften%5FSay%5FWrong <p>A few years ago, we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/20_Often-Mispronounced_Words.htm">20 words that are often mispronounced</a>.</p> <p>One of the reasons English is such a difficult language to learn is because you can neither rely on the pronunciation of a word to work out its spelling, nor can you rely on the spelling to work out the pronunciation. This is because English has evolved from a variety of different languages. Take a look at the following ‘<em>ch</em>’ words: cheese, champagne, chaos. While they’re all spelt with the same first two letters, the start of each word is pronounced differently: ‘<em>ch</em>’, ‘<em>sh</em>’, and ‘<em>k</em>’. </p> <p>This week we are going to look at 20 more hard-to-pronounce words, but it’s important to emphasise that pronunciations vary from region to region and from country to country. Take the word ‘<em>route</em>’ for example – here in Britain, we pronounce it ‘<strong>root</strong>’, but in America it is pronounced ‘<strong>rowt</strong>’. As a Yorkshire-based company, we certainly don’t believe that there is only one correct way to pronounce each word! </p> <p>Here are 20 words that can be difficult to say: </p> <ol> <li><strong>Asterisk </strong><br /> It’s easy to forget the ‘s’ in this word. Make sure you say <strong>aster-risk</strong> not <em>aster-rik</em>. </li> <li><strong>Cache</strong> <br /> Pronounce this word <strong>cash</strong> not <em>catch</em>. </li> <li><strong>Cavalry</strong> <br /> People often mix up where the ‘l’ falls in this word. Say <strong>caval-ree</strong> not <em>cal-very</em>. </li> <li><strong>Chaos</strong> <br /> This word is pronounced with a hard ‘c’ sound: <strong>kay-oss</strong> not <em>chay-oss</em> or <em>shay-oss</em>.</li> <li><strong>Chest of Drawers </strong><br /> Many people blur the words ‘chest’ and ‘of’ when talking about this piece of furniture. Make sure to separate them and say <strong>chest of drawers</strong> and not <em>chester drawers</em>. </li> <li><strong> February</strong> <br /> This word is traditionally pronounced <strong>Feb-ru-air-ee</strong>, but the pronunciation <strong>Feb-you-air-ee</strong> is also correct. </li> <li><strong>Heinous </strong><br /> This word is pronounced <strong>hay-nus</strong>. </li> <li><strong> Miniature </strong><br /> In British English, the ‘a’ in ‘miniature’ isn’t pronounced, but in American English it is. Pronounce this word either <strong>mini-chur </strong>or <strong>minia-chur</strong>. </li> <li> <strong>Moot </strong><br /> This word is pronounced like it is spelt. Say <strong>moot</strong> not <em>mute</em>.</li> <li><strong>Niche </strong><br /> Pronounce this word <strong>neesh</strong> not <em>nitch</em>. </li> <li><strong>Nuclear </strong><br /> Many people incorrectly pronounce this word <em>nuke-yuh-luhr</em>. Make sure you say <strong>new-klee-uhr</strong>. </li> <li><strong>Picture </strong><br /> Don’t forget to pronounce the ‘c’ in this word. Say <strong>pic-chur</strong> not <em>pitcher</em>. </li> <li><strong> Prescription </strong><br /> It’s easy to mix up the ‘r’ and the ‘e’ when saying this word. Say <strong>pruh-scrip-shun</strong> not <em>per-scrip-shun</em>. </li> <li><strong>Probably </strong><br /> People often miss out the second ‘b’ in ‘probably’. This word is pronounced <strong>prob-ab-lee</strong> not <em>prob-lee</em>. </li> <li><strong>Prostate </strong><br /> A second ‘r’ gets added to this word when people mix it up with the similar word ‘prostrate’. Say <strong>pros-tate</strong> not <em>pros-trate</em>. </li> <li> <strong>Quinoa </strong><br /> This word is pronounced <strong>keen-wah</strong>. </li> <li><strong>Sherbet </strong><br /> Don’t let a second ‘r’ sneak its way into this word. Say <strong>sher-but</strong> not <em>sher-burt</em>. </li> <li><strong>Suite </strong><br /> The ‘ui’ in this word is very confusing! ‘Suite’ is pronounced <strong>sweet</strong> not <em>soo-t</em>. </li> <li><strong>Utmost </strong><br /> Pay particular attention to the first two letters in this word. Say <strong>ut-most</strong> not <em>up-most</em>. </li> <li><strong>Wednesday </strong><br /> Despite what its spelling might suggest, this word is pronounced with two syllables. Say <strong>Whens-day</strong> not <em>Wenners-day</em> or <em>Wed-ners-day</em>. </li> </ol> <p>Did you know that our dictionary includes phonetic recordings of each word? Type in the word you’re interested in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/index.cfm">here</a> to hear how it is pronounced. </p> <p>Have a great week! </p> Mon, 21 Aug 2017 10:14:14 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5FPeople%5FOften%5FSay%5FWrong English idioms, idiom, friendship idioms, friendship, a shoulder to cry on, birds of a feather, close-knit, peas in a pod, thick as thieves, joined at the hip, build bridges, bury the hatchet, like a house on fire, bedfellows, speak the same language Twenty Idioms about Friendship http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FFriendship <ol> <li><strong>a shoulder to cry on</strong> – someone who listens sympathetically </li> <li><strong> birds of a feather flock together</strong> – people who have the same outlook/tastes/interests will be found in each other's company </li> <li><strong>close-knit</strong> – very close </li> <li><strong> like two peas in a pod</strong> – very similar </li> <li><strong>through thick and thin</strong> – through all circumstances no matter how difficult</li> <li><strong> to be as thick as thieves</strong> – to be very close or friendly </li> <li> <strong>to be joined at the hip</strong> – to be inseparable </li> <li> <strong>to be on the same page/wavelength</strong> – to be in agreement </li> <li><strong>to build bridges</strong> – to promote friendly relations between people or groups </li> <li><strong> to bury the hatchet</strong> – to end a conflict </li> <li><strong>to clear the air</strong> – to defuse the tension </li> <li><strong>to get on famously </strong>– to get on very well with someone </li> <li> <strong>to get on like a house on fire</strong> – to get on very well with someone</li> <li><strong> to get on swimmingly</strong> – to get on very well with someone </li> <li><strong> to hit it off</strong> – to find yourself immediately and naturally friendly with someone </li> <li><strong> to know someone inside out</strong> – to know someone very well </li> <li><strong>to make strange bedfellows</strong> – to make unlikely companions </li> <li><strong> to move in the same circles</strong> – to socialise with the same people all of whom have a similar background or lifestyle </li> <li><strong>to see eye to eye with someone</strong> – to agree with someone</li> <li><strong> to speak the same language</strong> – to understand someone as a result your shared values or opinions </div></ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Tue, 15 Aug 2017 12:22:10 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FFriendship confusing words, English words, flair and flare, flair, flare, English dictionary, example sentences, vocabulary lists, word lists, flair for music, flared his nostrils, flared trousers, emergency flare, Old French, American English, Scandinavian, Dutch Commonly Confused Words: Flair vs. Flare http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFlair%5Fvs%2E%5FFlare <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> If you have <strong>flair</strong>, it means you have natural talent for something or a distinctive and stylish elegance. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/flair">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>flair</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li> It was only the pupil’s first piano lesson, but the teacher could already tell he had a <strong>flair</strong> for music. </li> <li>Her clothes have such <strong>flair</strong>, don’t you think? </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=flair&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>flair</strong>. </p> <p>If a something <strong>flares</strong>, it spreads outwards. The word is often used to describe sudden bursts or light, fire, or emotion. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/flare">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>flare</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>He <strong>flared</strong> his nostrils in exasperation. </li> <li>Over the ocean, they saw a red <strong>flare</strong> shoot into the night’s sky. </li> <li>The fashion was to wear <strong>flared</strong> trousers. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=flare&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word flare. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p>In the mid-fourteenth century, the word <strong>flair</strong> used to mean ‘<em>odour</em>’. It came from the Old French ‘<em>flaire</em>’ meaning ‘<em>fragrance, sense of smell</em>’, which in turn came from the Latin ‘<em>fragrare</em>’ meaning ‘<em>emit (a sweet) odour</em>’. The word’s modern meaning is American English and dates back to 1925. This meaning probably derives from hunting and a dog’s skill for tracking an animal’s scent. </p> <p>The origin of <strong>flare</strong> is uncertain, but the word dates back to the 1540s and perhaps comes from Scandinavian or Dutch. The meaning ‘to shine out with sudden light’ is from the 1630s, the meaning ‘<em>giving off of a bright, unsteady light</em>’ from 1814, the meaning ‘<em>signal fire</em>’ from 1883, and the meaning ‘<em>flared trousers</em>’ from 1964. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>Fl<strong>air</strong> has the word <strong>air</strong> in it. </li> <li>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘He had a real fl<strong>air</strong> for h<strong>air</strong>dressing.’ </li> <li>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘Take c<strong>are</strong> when you light that fl<strong>are</strong>.’ </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 07 Aug 2017 09:57:15 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFlair%5Fvs%2E%5FFlare spelling practice, spelling practise, improve spelling, spelling games, spelling worksheets, spelling ability test, spelling course, phonic spelling, spelling rules, spelling patterns, curriculum word lists, KS3 spelling lists, vocabulary word lists Guide to Spellzone Word Lists http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FGuide%5Fto%5FSpellzone%5FWord%5FLists <p> For Spellzone users, word lists are a vital part of learning how to spell.</p> <p>While most of our students are looking to improve their spelling, it is important to remember that not everyone will find the same words difficult to learn. Students studying different subjects at school may also have different sets of vocabulary that they are required to be familiar with – it is unlikely that someone studying Biology will need to know the same terms as someone studying Drama. Our word list feature is a great way to adapt Spellzone to your specific needs by creating lists featuring the words you personally struggle with. <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Using_Spellzone_Word_Lists_as_Part_of_Your_Exam_Preparation.htm">Click here to learn how</a>. </p> <p>We also have a huge collection of existing word lists in a wide array of subjects. You can find these under the ‘<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/index.cfm">Word Lists</a>’ tab on the top right of any page of our site. There you will also find a list of Spellzone’s most popular word lists at any given moment on the left hand side of the page, and a word cloud of the words students are learning at any given moment at the bottom of a page. When you have clicked through to a list, choose on the ‘eye’ icon at the top of each list to learn using the ‘<em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em>’ activity; the ‘ear’ icon to take a ‘<em>Listen and Spell</em>’ test; and the ‘football’ icon to play games using your words. Click the ‘paper’ icon to print a word list as worksheets for off-line study. </p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/course_lists.cfm">Course Word Lists<br /> </a></strong>The spelling course is central to Spellzone. After taking our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Spelling_Ability_Test.htm">Spelling Ability Test</a>, students are given a personally tailored pathway through the spelling course to work on. The <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/what-is-spellzone.cfm">Starter Course</a> teaches all the basic phonic spelling rules using multi-sensory activities. The 36 units of the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/what-is-spellzone.cfm">Main Course</a> explore all the spelling rules, breaking them down into basic building blocks that test and track progress along the way. You can work through a unit as many times as you want, or you can head to our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/course_lists.cfm">course word lists</a> to practise words that follow a specific spelling rule or pattern. </p> <p>Spellzone also creates ‘My Difficult Words’ bespoke lists for each student as they work through the course units. These are made from the words that the student spell incorrectly so they can learn them using the <em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check </em>activity, <em>Listen and Spell</em> test and the Spellzone games. </p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists-curriculum.cfm">Curriculum Word Lists<br /> </a></strong>While these word lists follow the English school curriculum, we are sure our students from around the world will find them useful too. This collection includes <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists-curriculum.cfm">curriculum guides and is targeted at students in Key Stages 1-3</a>. Lists in this collection also focus on high frequency words and subject-specific vocabulary. Learn more about the Key Stage 3 spelling lists <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Key_Stage_3_Spelling_Lists.htm">here</a>. </p> <p>If you are a teacher anywhere in the world and would like us to add word lists that are specific to your curriculum please <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/contact.cfm">get in touch</a>. </p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/vocabulary_lists.cfm">Vocabulary Word Lists<br /> </a></strong>In these lists, words are grouped by subject. While these lists are suitable for all Spellzone users, they will be particularly useful for students who are learning English. You can find out more about how to make the most of Spellzone as a second-language English speaker here. Use our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/vocabulary_lists.cfm">vocabulary word lists</a> to test yourself on a variety of words grouped in subjects ranging from animals to musical instruments to the Zodiac signs. </p> <p>You can bookmark lists <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/bookmarked-lists.cfm">here</a>, check out the word lists created by schools <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_by_school.cfm">here</a>, and keep track of the word lists you have created <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_my.cfm">here</a>. </p> <p>Have a good week! </p> Mon, 31 Jul 2017 11:38:53 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FGuide%5Fto%5FSpellzone%5FWord%5FLists English idioms, idiom, cat idioms, cat and mouse, scaredy cat, cat burglar, catnap, copycat, curiosity killed the cat, cat on a hot tin roof, herding cats, raining cats and dogs, cat among the pigeons Idioms about Cats http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FCats <body> <ol> <li><strong> a cat may look at a king</strong> – someone of low status still has rights <li><strong> a fraidy/scaredy-cat</strong> – a timid/fearful person <li><strong> all cats are grey in the dark</strong> – if the qualities distinguishing people can’t be perceived, they don’t matter <li><strong>cat burglar</strong> – an agile, stealthy, and unnoticed burglar who climbs up walls and through windows to enter buildings <li><strong>cat call</strong> - a shrill shout or whistle expressing either sexual admiration but in a predatory and victimising manner or disapproval <li><strong>cat got your tongue?</strong> – a question posed to someone who remains silent when expected to speak <li><strong>catnap</strong> – a short sleep during the day <li><strong>copycat </strong>– someone who copies another’s behaviour/clothes/ideas/work <li><strong>curiosity killed the cat</strong> – being nosy might get you into trouble <li><strong>like a cat on a hot tin roof</strong> – agitated/anxious <li><strong>like a scalded cat </strong>– very quickly <li><strong>like herding cats</strong> – difficult/impossible <li><strong> not enough room to swing a cat</strong> – very confined <li><strong> raining cats and dogs</strong> – raining heavily <li><strong> the cat’s whiskers/pyjamas</strong> – an excellent person or thing, of the highest quality <li><strong> there is more than one way to skin a cat </strong>– there are multiple ways to achieve your aim <li><strong>to fight like cats and dogs </strong>– to constantly fight <li><strong>to let the cat out of the bag</strong> – to expose a secret <li><strong>to look like something the cat dragged in</strong> – to look dirty or scruffy <li><strong> to look like the cat that swallowed the canary/stole the cream</strong> – to look very pleased/satisfied with oneself <li><strong>to not have a cat in hell’s chance</strong> – to have no chance <li><strong> to play cat and mouse with (someone)</strong> – to use cunning manoeuvres to trick/thwart someone <li><strong> to see which way the cat jumps</strong> – to see what direction something is taking before committing yourself <li><strong>to set a cat among the pigeons</strong> – to cause controversy <li><strong>when the cat's away, the mice will play</strong> – people will always take advantage of the absence of authority to do what they want to </ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> </body> Mon, 24 Jul 2017 09:56:24 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FCats Avani Shah, The Guardian, Estate BAME Short Story Prize, Danuta Kean, Writing the Future, Creative Writing, University of East Anglia, Grunwick Strike, Word Factory, Audible Avani Shah, Spellzone writer - audio book - BAME Short Story Prize 2017 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Avani%5FShah%2C%5FSpellzone%5Fwriter%5F%2D%5Faudio%5Fbook%5F%2D%5FBAME%5FShort%5FStory%5FPrize%5F2017 <p>We are delighted that Avani’s short story which has been shortlisted for the ‘The Guardian 4th Estate BAME Short Story Prize 2017’ is now available as a free audio book from Audible. </p> <p>Some wonderful stories well worth a listen – Avani’s story ‘Greed’ is Chapter 4.</p> <p>If you are viewing on a laptop go <a href="http://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Fiction/FREE-New-Voices-The-Guardian-4th-Estate-BAME-Short-Story-Prize-2017-Audiobook/B073VTF5PH?qid=1499935461&sr=1-3">here.</a></p> <p>If you are viewing on a mobile device go <a href="https://mobile.audible.co.uk/pd/Fiction/FREE-New-Voices-The-Guardian-4th-Estate-BAME-Short-Story-Prize-2017-Audiobook/B073VTF5PH?qid=1499935461&sr=1-3">here</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Spellzone_Writer_Shortlisted_for_Prestigious_Prize.htm">See previous blog for more information</a>.</p> Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:32:05 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Avani%5FShah%2C%5FSpellzone%5Fwriter%5F%2D%5Faudio%5Fbook%5F%2D%5FBAME%5FShort%5FStory%5FPrize%5F2017 confusing words, English words, hear and here, perceiving a sound, ear, Spellzone, English dictionary, example sentences, vocabulary lists, word lists, Old English, heran, Proto-Germanic Commonly Confused Words: Hear vs. Here http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHear%5Fvs%2E%5FHere <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> If you <strong>hear</strong> something, it means you are perceiving a sound with your ear.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/hear">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>hear</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>She <strong>heard</strong> the rumble of the approaching train. </li> <li>Did you <strong>hear</strong> what happened at the party? </li> <li>She didn’t want to <strong>hear</strong> what they were saying about her. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=hear&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>hear</strong>. </p> <p>The word <strong>here</strong> is used by a speaker or writer to refer to the place or position they are currently in. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/here">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>here</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>We’ve been meeting <strong>here</strong> at the community centre for years. </li> <li>I can’t wait to get out of <strong>here</strong>. </li> <li>On this page, we have used hyperlinks on the word <strong>here</strong> to direct students to other parts of the Spellzone website. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=here&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word here. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Hear</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>heran</em>’ which means ‘<em>to hear, perceive by the ear, listen (to), obey, follow; accede to, grant; judge</em>’. ‘<em>Heran</em>’ comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘<em>hauzjan</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Here</strong> has been used in English since around 1600. It comes from the Old English ‘<em>her</em>’ meaning ‘<em>in this place, where one puts himself; at this time, toward this place</em>’. The phrase ‘<em><strong>here</strong> and now</em>’ dates back to 1829. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>H<strong>ear</strong> has the word <strong>ear</strong> in it. Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘You <strong>hear</strong> with your <strong>ear</strong>.’ </li> <li> <strong>Here</strong> is the opposite of the word <strong>there</strong>. T<strong>here</strong> contains the word <strong>here</strong>. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:05:06 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHear%5Fvs%2E%5FHere abbreviation, e.g. , English sentences, example sentences, CV, cover letter, application form, spelling mistakes, improve your spelling, spelling tests, spelling games, spelling lessons, i.e., information in a sentence, improve spelling, Latin phrases Commonly Confused Words: e.g. vs. i.e. http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5Fe%2Eg%2E%5Fvs%2E%5Fi%2Ee%2E <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> The abbreviation <strong>e.g.</strong> is used in a sentence to indicate that you are about to provide an example. <p>Here is <strong>e.g.</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>When applying for a job, make sure you check everything your potential employer will see (<strong>e.g.</strong> your CV, cover letter, application form, etc.) for spelling mistakes. </li> <li>Spellzone has a variety of features that will help you improve your spelling, <strong>e.g.</strong> spelling tests, spelling games, and spelling lessons.</li> </ul> <p>You should never use <strong>e.g.</strong> at the start of a sentence.</p> <p>The abbreviation <strong>i.e.</strong> is used to clarify the information provided in a sentence.</p> <p>Here is <strong>i.e.</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>When applying for a job, make sure everything your potential employer will see is spelt correctly, <strong>i.e.</strong> you should check your CV and any other documents for spelling mistakes before sending them in </li> <li>Spellzone is used by a variety of users all whom have one thing in common, <strong>i.e.</strong> they all want to improve their spelling. </li> </ul> <p>You should never use <strong>i.e.</strong> at the start of a sentence.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p>The word <strong>e.g.</strong> has been used in English since the 1680s. It is an abbreviation of the Latin phrase ‘<em>exempli gratia</em>’ which means ‘for the sake of example’.</p> <p>The word <strong>i.e.</strong> is short for the Latin ‘<em>id est</em>’ which literally translates to ‘<em>that is (to say)</em>’. Rather than providing an example of something, <strong>i.e.</strong> is used to introduce another way of saying the same thing in order to clarify meaning.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>Use the <strong>e</strong> in <strong>e.g.</strong> to help you remember that this is another way of saying ‘for <strong>e</strong>xample’. </li> <li>Use the <strong>i</strong> in <strong>i.e.</strong> to help you remember that this is another way of saying ‘<strong>i</strong>n essence’ or ‘<strong>i</strong>n other words’. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flaunt_vs._Flout.htm">Flaunt vs. Flout</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Wed, 12 Jul 2017 09:43:40 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5Fe%2Eg%2E%5Fvs%2E%5Fi%2Ee%2E commas, clauses, commas in direct speech, commas between clauses, verb, English sentences, main clauses, subordinate clauses, conditional clauses, relative clauses, non-restrictive relative clause, restrictive relative clauses, semi colon, apostrophes Commas and Clauses http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commas%5Fand%5FClauses <p> Do you find commas confusing? Don’t worry – you’re not alone. Commas have a variety of functions yet many people are uncertain of how to use them. So far this year we’ve looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">how to use commas as part of a list</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Use_Commas_in_Direct_Speech.htm">how to use commas in direct speech</a>. Today we’re taking a look at how to use commas between clauses.</p> <p><strong>What is a clause? </strong></p> <p>A clause is a group of words containing a verb that can either stand alone as a complete sentence or make up part of a more complex sentence. Complex sentences are usually split into main clauses and subordinate clauses. </p> <p><strong>Subordinate Clauses </strong></p> <p>A subordinate clause doesn’t make sense on it’s own – it needs the main clause to add meaning to it. Adding a comma between a main clause and a subordinate clause often helps make a sentence as clear as possible. Commas also help indicate when to take a ‘breath’ when reading a sentence.</p> <p>Here are some examples of subordinate clauses: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Having putting it off all day</strong>, she finally sat down to do her homework. </li> <li><strong>After we finished work</strong>, we counted how much money we made.</li> </ul> <p>There are different types of subordinate clauses and the importance of a comma depends on the type. Conditional Clauses A conditional clause describes something that is possible or probable. It usually begins with ‘if’ or ‘unless’.</p> <p>Here are some examples of conditional clauses: </p> <ul> <li> <strong>If it rains</strong>, we will have to postpone the picnic.</li> <li><strong>Unless there are train delays</strong>, we’ll arrive at four o’clock in the afternoon. </li> </ul> <p>The commas make these sentences clearer but they don’t affect their meaning. </p> <p><strong>Relative Clauses </strong></p> <p>A relative clause follows a word like ‘that’, ‘when’, ‘where’, ‘which’, ‘who’, ‘whom’, or ‘whose’ and adds extra information to a sentence. If the information being added is interesting but not essential, a comma often adds clarity to the sentence. These types of clause are known as a non-restrictive relative clause. </p> <p>Here are some examples of non-restrictive relative clauses: </p> <ul> <li>My mother went to Venice, <strong>where she enjoyed exploring the canals and eating spaghetti.</strong> </li> <li> I celebrated my birthday with my cousins, <strong>who I hadn’t seen in years.</strong> </li> </ul> <p>If a non-restrictive relative clause is in the middle of a sentence, you should use a comma both before and after it. For example: </p> <ul> <li>Thomas, <strong>who I have known for ten years</strong>, came to visit. </li> </ul> <p>In some sentences, however, the relative clause adds essential information. Without this information, the sentence wouldn’t make sense. These sentences are known as restrictive relative clauses and you should not put commas before or after them.</p> <p> Here are some examples of restrictive relative clauses: </p> <ul> <li>I hate the man <strong>who lives across the street</strong>. </li> <li>Guests <strong>who have special passes</strong> can skip to the front of the queue.</li> </ul> <p>If you found this article useful, why not have a look at some of our other posts about punctuation? </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Use_Commas_in_Direct_Speech.htm">How to use Commas in Direct Speech</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">How to Use Commas as Part of a List </a></li> <li> <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm">How to Use a Semi Colon </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">When to Use Capital Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shoulda,_Coulda,_Woulda-cc_Using_Apostrophes_to_Indicate_Missing_Letters">How to Use Apostrophes to Indicate Missing Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">Ten Tips for Using Apostrophes</a> </li> </ul> <p>Have a great week! </p> </body> Mon, 03 Jul 2017 15:44:49 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commas%5Fand%5FClauses English idioms, idiom, dancing idioms, dancing in the streets , footloose and fancy free, takes two to tango, all singing and dancing, step out of line, get off on t 25 Idioms about Dancing http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=25%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FDancing <ol> <li><strong>dancing in the streets</strong> – very happy</li> <li><strong>footloose and fancy free</strong> – free from commitment </li> <li><strong> it takes two to tango</strong> – both people/parties are responsible for the argument/problem </li> <li><strong>to be all-singing, all-dancing</strong> – to have a large range of impressive features/skills </li> <li><strong>to be light on one’s feet</strong> – to be nimble </li> <li><strong>to step out of line</strong> – to behave inappropriately/to break the rules </li> <li> <strong>to dance on air</strong> – to be very happy </li> <li><strong>to dance to someone’s tune</strong> – to comply with someone’s demands and whims </li> <li> <strong>to drag one’s feet/heels</strong> – to stall </li> <li><strong>to land/fall on one’s feet</strong> – to have good luck </li> <li><strong>to follow in someone’s footsteps</strong> – to do the same thing/make the same choices as someone else did before </li> <li><strong>to get into a groove</strong> – to warm up/to get used to doing something </li> <li><strong>to get off on the wrong foot</strong> – to make a bad start </li> <li><strong> to give it a whirl</strong> – to try something out </li> <li><strong>to have two left feet</strong> – to be clumsy or awkward </li> <li><strong>to keep one’s feet on the ground</strong> – to be practical/sensible/realistic about something </li> <li><strong>to keep someone on their toes</strong> – to make sure someone is concentrating and ready for any outcome </li> <li><strong>to make a song and dance out of something</strong> – to make a fuss about something </li> <li><strong>to put a toe out of line</strong> – to do something that breaks the rules </li> <li><strong> to put one’s best foot forward</strong> – to begin an endeavour with effort and determination </li> <li><strong> to sweep someone off their feet</strong> – to charm someone with romantic gestures </li> <li><strong> to think on one’s feet</strong> – to react to unexpected events in a decisive and practical manner </li> <li><strong> to tread/step on someone’s toes</strong> – to offend someone by interfering with their responsibilities </li> <li><strong> twinkle toes</strong> – someone who is nimble and quick in their feet </li> <li><strong> to strut one’s stuff</strong> – to dance/behave confidently and enthusiastically </li> </ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Mon, 26 Jun 2017 12:47:23 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=25%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FDancing Avani Shah, The Guardian, Estate BAME Short Story Prize, Danuta Kean, Writing the Future, Creative Writing, University of East Anglia, English language, spelling and grammar rules, word origins, idioms, Grunwick Strike, Word Factory Spellzone Writer Shortlisted for Prestigious Prize http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spellzone%5FWriter%5FShortlisted%5Ffor%5FPrestigious%5FPrize <p> We are delighted to announce that one of our writers Avani Shah has been shortlisted for the 2017 Guardian 4th Estate BAME Short Story Prize.</p> <p>The prize is now in its second year and, according to Danuta Kean, writing for <em>The Guardian</em>, was ‘set up in 2015 to find “fresh compelling writing” by minority ethnic writers in the wake of the Writing the Future report of 2015, which revealed the poor representation of black and Asian writers of fiction in the UK.’ You can find out more about the prize <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2017/jun/05/guardian-4th-estate-bame-short-story-prize-shortlist">here</a>. </p> <p>Avani, who holds a Master of Arts with Distinction in Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) from the University of East Anglia, has been writing for Spellzone since 2013. She says, ‘It wasn’t until I started working with Spellzone that I realised just how much of my understanding of the English language was instinctive. I knew particular spelling and grammar rules but never questioned how and why these rules came to exist. Learning about the origins of words and idioms for my articles has made me look at the language and my own writing in a totally different way. It has helped me understand that language is fluid and we can be creative about how we choose to use it<em>.</em>’ As well as short stories, Avani is working on a novel about photography and punk set in 1977 against the backdrop on the Grunwick Strike. The story follows the lives of three sisters in the wake of their mother’s death. You can read an extract <a href="http://www.newwriting.net/student_writing/we-are-those-lions/">here</a> and find more of her work <a href="http://www.unthankbooks.com/bookshop/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=67">here</a>. </p> <p>Kean writes: ‘Announcing the shortlist, Sian Cain, judge and Guardian books website editor, praised the “<em>sheer range of styles and settings</em>”, which she said demonstrated “<em>how many different stories publishers are missing when they pass on publishing British BAME writers</em>”. […] Greed by Avani Shah – who grew up behind the counter in various newsagents’ shops around London – tells the story of 12-year-old Puja, who is finding a religious fast increasingly uncomfortable, while trying to make sense of why her relationship with family friend Akaash has changed. Based in Norwich, Shah has already been spotted by <a href="http://www.thewordfactory.tv/site/">Word Factory</a>, a national organisation supporting excellence in short fiction, and is one of its four 2017 apprentices.’ </p> <p>The lucky winner of the prize – announced on July 13th – will receive £1000 as well as a one-day workshop with 4th Estate and publication on the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/uk">Guardian website</a>. We have our fingers crossed!</p> </body> Mon, 19 Jun 2017 10:00:07 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spellzone%5FWriter%5FShortlisted%5Ffor%5FPrestigious%5FPrize word lists, flaunt, flout, dictionary, confusing English words, English sentences, vocabulary lists, example sentences, verb, English sentences, ostentatious, flaunted, new iPhone, word lists, mock, scoff, flout the rules, middle English, tutting Commonly Confused Words: Flaunt vs. Flout http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFlaunt%5Fvs%2E%5FFlout <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> If you <strong>flaunt</strong> something, it means you are displaying it in an ostentatious manner.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/flaunt">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is flaunt used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>He <strong>flaunted</strong> his new shoes. </li> <li>Having saved up for months, she was looking forward to <strong>flaunting</strong> her new iPhone. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=flaunt&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>flaunt</strong>. </p> <p>If you <strong>flout</strong> something, it means you are disregarding a rule or convention. The word is also sometimes used to mean ‘<em>mock</em>’ or <em>‘scoff</em>’. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/flout">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>flout</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>She decided to <strong>flout</strong> the rules and skip school. </li> <li>He was a terrible driver, always <strong>flouting</strong> the law by disregarding the speed limit. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list using the word <strong>flout</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p>The origins of both <strong>flaunt</strong> and <strong>flout</strong> are unknown. </p> <p>The word <strong>flout</strong> perhaps comes from a particular use of the Middle English ‘<em>flowton</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to play the flute</em>’. Flowten is similar to the Middle Dutch ‘<em>fluyten</em>’ which means ‘<em>to jeer</em>’ as well as ‘<em>to play the flute</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Flaunt</strong>, it is speculated, began as a variant of <strong>flout</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>Think of the feeling of wanting to show off something <strong>n</strong>ew to help you remember flau<strong>n</strong>t is spelt with an <strong>n</strong>. </li> <li>Say to yourself: ‘My <strong>aunt</strong> always fl<strong>aunt</strong>s her new clothes.’ </li> <li>Think of t<strong>ut</strong>ting at someone who is flo<strong>ut</strong>ing the law to help you remember the word ends in <strong>ut</strong>.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 13 Jun 2017 14:09:03 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFlaunt%5Fvs%2E%5FFlout word lists, poll, pole, dictionary, English sentences, vocabulary lists, example sentences, English dictionary, public opinion, verb, example English sentences, polling station, vote, election, Apple products, North pole, South Pole Confused Words: Poll vs. Pole http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FPoll%5Fvs%2E%5FPole <p> A <strong>poll</strong> is a way of looking into the public opinion of something by gathering information through votes or interviews. The word can also be used as a verb to describe the act of gathering this information. <p> Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/poll">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>poll</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>It is imperative that you go to the <strong>poll</strong>ing station and vote in the election. </li> <li>He took a <strong>poll</strong> to see which members of the group used Apple products. </li> <li>They <strong>polled</strong> a sample of the public in attempt to predict the outcome. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=poll&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>poll</strong>.</p> <p>A <strong>pole</strong> is a long rod, usually round and made of wood, metal, or plastic. The word is also used to describe both someone from Poland and magnetic poles (i.e. the North and South Poles).</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/pole">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>pole</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The holiday was almost ruined because the tent <strong>poles</strong> went missing. </li> <li> Father Christmas is rumoured to live at the North <strong>Pole</strong>. </li> <li>While travelling around Europe, she met Italians, Germans, Swedes, and <strong>Poles</strong>.</li> </ul> <p> Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=pole&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>pole</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Poll</strong> dates back to the early fourteenth century when it meant ‘<em>head</em>’. The first recorded use of the word to mean ‘<em>collection of votes</em>’ (i.e. the number of heads) was in the 1620s.</p> <p><strong>Pole</strong> comes from the late Old English ‘<em>pal</em>’ (meaning ‘<em>stake, pole post</em>’) which was a Germanic borrowing from the Latin ‘<em>palus</em>’ meaning <em>‘stake</em>’. When talking about the North and South poles, the word comes from the Latin ‘<em>polus</em>’ which in turn comes from the Greek ‘<em>polos</em>’ meaning ‘<em>pivot, axis of a sphere, the sky</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <p>Think of the single <strong>l</strong> in <strong>pole</strong> as a long pole that reaches above the rest of the word. </li> </ul> </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 05 Jun 2017 20:05:12 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FPoll%5Fvs%2E%5FPole English words, idioms, science and technology idioms, cog in the machine, well-oiled machine, acid test, bright as a button, bells and whistles, cutting edge, not rocket science, blow a fuse, panic button, pull the plug, reinvent the wheel Idioms about Science and Technology http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FScience%5Fand%5FTechnology <ol> <li><strong> a cog in the machine</strong> – an insignificant member of a huge organisation or system </li> <li><strong>a well-oiled machine</strong> – an organisation that operates smoothly </li> <li><strong>acid test</strong> – a test of something’s value or success </li> <li><strong>as bright as a button</strong> – very intelligent </li> <li><strong>bells and whistles</strong> – extra features and trimmings </li> <li><strong>cutting edge</strong> – advanced and innovative </li> <li><strong>in tune with</strong> – in agreement or harmony with someone or something </li> <li><strong> it’s not rocket science</strong> – it’s not difficult </li> <li><strong>on the ball</strong> – alert </li> <li><strong>on the same wavelength</strong> – to be in agreement/to have similar views and ideas </li> <li><strong>to blow a fuse</strong> – to lose your temper </li> <li><strong>to button your lip</strong> – to stay quiet </li> <li> <strong>to get your wires crossed</strong> – to have a misunderstanding </li> <li><strong>to have something down to a science</strong> – to have perfected something through routine and repetition </li> <li><strong>to hit the panic button</strong> – to panic or take emergency measures </li> <li><strong>to know what makes someone tick</strong> – to know what motivates someone </li> <li><strong>to pull the plug</strong> – to prevent something from continuing or happening </li> <li><strong>to push someone’s buttons</strong> – to provoke someone </li> <li><strong> to reinvent the wheel</strong> – to waste time and effort creating something that already exists </li> <li><strong>to run out of steam</strong> – to lose enthusiasm </li> </ol> </li> </ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Tue, 30 May 2017 09:28:49 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FScience%5Fand%5FTechnology subject and object, subjective pronouns, objective pronouns, I, me, who, whom, verbs, Spellzone, vocabulary lists, English sentence, speaking English, English word lists Commonly Confused Words: Who vs. Whom http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FWho%5Fvs%2E%5FWhom <p> Over the last few weeks, we’ve looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">subject and object</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Pronouns.htm">subjective and objective pronouns</a>. In most cases we know whether to use a subjective pronoun or an objective pronoun instinctively, but there are two pairs of pronouns that people often confuse: <strong>I vs. me</strong> and <strong>who vs. whom</strong>. <p>This week we’re going to look at when to use <strong>who</strong> and when to use <strong>whom</strong>. To learn about when to use <strong>I</strong> and when to use <strong>me</strong>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Two_Mistakes_That_Are_Not_Necessarily_Mistakes.htm">click here</a>. <p><strong> When should you use the word ‘who’?</strong> <p>You should use <strong>who</strong> when the word you are referring to the subject of a sentence. Learn more about subjects and verbs <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">here</a>. <p>Here is <strong>who</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>The two women, <strong>who</strong> have known each other since childhood, are turning eighty this year. </li> <li><strong>Who</strong> left the light on? </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=who&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>who</strong>.</p> <p><strong>When should you use the word ‘whom’?</strong></p> <p>You should use <strong>whom</strong> when the word you are referring to the object of a sentence. Learn more about objects and verbs <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">here</a>.</p> <p>Here is <strong>whom</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>My aunt <strong>whom</strong> you met yesterday is visiting again next year. </li> <li> To <strong>whom</strong> do you wish to speak? </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=who&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>whom.</strong></p> <p>Although it is correct to use <strong>whom</strong> in place of the objective pronoun in a sentence, most people deem this too formal when speaking and will use <strong>who</strong> instead.</p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li>My aunt <strong>who</strong> you met yesterday is visiting again next year. </li> <li><strong>Who</strong> would you like to speak to? </li> </ul> <p>In writing, we recommend you use <strong>whom</strong> in these instances.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <p>Try and rephrase your sentence using other pronouns.</p> <p>If your sentence works with <strong>he</strong>, <strong>she</strong>, or <strong>they</strong>, use <strong>who</strong>.</p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li><strong>They</strong> have known each other since childhood. </li> <li><strong>She </strong>left the light on. </li> </ul> <p>If your sentence works with <strong>him</strong>, <strong>her</strong>, or <strong>them</strong>, use <strong>whom</strong>.</p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li>You met <strong>her</strong> yesterday </li> <li>Do you want to speak to <strong>him</strong>? </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weigh</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> </p> Mon, 22 May 2017 10:49:06 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FWho%5Fvs%2E%5FWhom word lists, definition of the words wait and weight, wait, weight Spellzone, dictionary, English sentences, vocabulary lists, example sentences, English dictionary, Old North French, Old English, Proto Germanic Commonly Confused Words: Wait vs. Weight http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FWait%5Fvs%2E%5FWeight <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> The word <strong>wait</strong> refers to the act of staying in one place in anticipation or expectation of something happening. The word also describes the act of serving food when in relation to a waiter or waitress. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/wait">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>wait </strong>used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>We <strong>waited</strong> for the bus. </li> <li>She decided to <strong>wait</strong> until she’d read the book before watching the film adaptation.</li> <li>He had an evening job <strong>waiting</strong> tables. </li> <li>There’s an hour-long <strong>wait</strong> to go on the rollercoaster.</li> <li>We had a long <strong>wait</strong> at the airport. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=wait&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>wait</strong>.</p> <p>The <strong>weight </strong>of something refers to how heavy it is. The word is also used to describe a type of sports equipment used for strength training.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/weight">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>weight </strong>used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The baby was a healthy <strong>weight</strong>. </li> <li>She enjoys lifting <strong>weights</strong> at the gym. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=weight&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>weight</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p>The word <strong>wait </strong>comes from the Old North French ‘<em>waiter</em>’ meaning ‘<em>look-out, watch, sentry</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Weight</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>gewhit</em>’ which in turn comes from the Proto Germanic ‘<em>wihti</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>W</strong>aiting <strong>A</strong>lways <strong>I</strong>s <strong>T</strong>edious </li> <li>W<strong>eight</strong> has the word <strong>eight</strong> in it. </li> <li> Use the word <strong>h</strong>eavy to help you remember weig<strong>h</strong>t has the letter ‘<strong>h</strong>’ in it. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 15 May 2017 20:36:19 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FWait%5Fvs%2E%5FWeight