Spelling English spelling blog http://www.spellzone.com/ Information about all things regarding spelling, English language, English teaching, language help and learning and foreign languages English, spelling, language Spelling English spelling course http://www.spellzone.com/images/spellzone_name_on_small.jpg http://www.spellzone.com/ English words, idioms, mothers and parenting, Mother’s Day, english words and expressions, tiger mother, mama, Mother Goose, mother hen, Mother Nature , Mother of God, the Virgin Mary, mother’s milk, apron strings, keep mum Words and Idioms about Mothers and Parenting http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5Fand%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FMothers%5Fand%5FParenting <p>Happy Mother’s Day! Here are 20 words and expressions about mothers and parenting. </p> <ol> <li><strong>a face only a mother could love</strong> – an ugly face </li> <li><strong>a mother has eyes in the back of her head </strong>– a mother knows what her children are doing even when she can’t see them </li> <li><strong>a tiger mother</strong> – a strict and demanding mother </li> <li><strong>everyone and his mothe</strong>r – lots of people </li> <li><strong> like mother, like daughter </strong>– daughters often behave like their mothers did before them </li> <li><strong>mama’s boy </strong>– a boy or man who is easily influenced by his mother </li> <li><strong>Mother Goose </strong>– a fictitious collector of nursery rhymes from the eighteenth century </li> <li><strong>mother hen</strong> – someone who fusses over others in a maternal way </li> <li><strong>mother house</strong> – the principle house in a religious order </li> <li><strong>Mother Nature</strong> – the personification of nature </li> <li><strong>Mother of God </strong>– the Virgin Mary </li> <li><strong>mother’s milk</strong> – something necessary and important </li> <li><strong>mother’s ruin</strong> – gin </li> <li><strong>mothercraft</strong> – skills related to the care of children </li> <li> <strong>‘Mum’s the word!’</strong> – ‘Say nothing!’ </li> <li><strong>necessity is the mother of invention</strong> – when the need for something is crucial, one will find ways of creating, finding or achieving it</li> <li><strong>the mother of all (something)</strong> – the largest/most extreme of something </li> <li><strong>tied to his mother’s apron strings </strong>– attached and dependent on his mother </li> <li><strong>to keep mum </strong>– to keep quiet about something </li> <li><strong> to learn something at your mother’s knee</strong> – to learn something at an early age </li> </ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles? </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a> </li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms </a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/%E2%80%A2Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart </a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li> Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time!.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm"> Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a></li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm"> Thirty Idioms about Food</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean</a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a> </li> <li> <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature </a></li> </ul> Fri, 24 Mar 2017 09:14:22 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5Fand%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FMothers%5Fand%5FParenting confusing english words, verbs, word lists, complacent, complaisant, vocabulary lists, example english sentences, The Online Etymology Dictionary, create vocabulary lists Commonly Confused Words: Complacent vs. Complaisant http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FComplacent%5Fvs%2E%5FComplaisant <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> <strong>Complacent</strong> is adjective that describes one who is ‘<em>contended to a fault with oneself or one’s actions.</em>’ <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/complacent">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>complacent</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>After getting a few good grades, I became <strong>complacent</strong> and now I’m at risk of failing the year.</li> <li>Business is down this year – we can’t afford to be <strong>complacent</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=complacent&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>complacent</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Complaisant</strong> is adjective that describes someone who shows ‘<em>a cheerful willingness to do favours for others</em>’.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/Complaisant_">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>complaisant</strong> used in an example sentence:</p> <ul> <li>We were worried the librarian would be annoyed with us for asking questions but, in fact, she was very <strong>complaisant</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list including the word <strong>complaisant</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p> Both <strong>complaisant</strong> and <strong>complaisant</strong> come from the Latin ‘<em>complacere</em>’ which means ‘<em>very pleasing</em>’. <strong>Complacent</strong> took on the meaning ‘<em>pleased with oneself</em>’ in 1767, but both words were used interchangeably to mean ‘<em>willingness to please</em>’ until the mid-nineteenth century.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Com<u>place</u>nt</strong> has the word <strong>place</strong> in it. Think of the act of being <strong>complacent</strong> as choosing to stay in the same <strong>place</strong> (due to contentedness or laziness) rather than choosing to improve your situation. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Wed, 15 Mar 2017 10:55:23 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FComplacent%5Fvs%2E%5FComplaisant homophones, English language, learn English, english words, English spellings, english words spelt differently, phonetically, mnemonics, phonetic pronunciation, etymology, learning to spell, Latin, Old English, word lists, spelling games Tips for Handling Homophones http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Tips%5Ffor%5FHandling%5FHomophones <p>English is a tricky language to learn and one of the things that makes it so difficult is that it’s full of words that sound the same but have different meanings or spellings. These words are called homophones.</p> <p>In the past, we’ve looked at many pairs and groups of homophones in our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_Quick_Reference_Guide-cc_Part_2.htm">Commonly Confused Words</a> series. This week we’re sharing tips for handling homophones – scroll down to make sure you never mix up your meanings again! </p> <ul> <li><strong>Use homophones in the same sentence to show their different meanings. <br /> <br /> </strong>For example: <br /> <br /> <ul> <li>Although we had a <strong>ball</strong> dancing the night away at the summer <strong>ball</strong>, we were so tired the next day we had to miss our foot<strong>ball</strong> practice. <br /> <br /> </li> <li>My grandmother didn’t have a will and after her death we had to <strong>broach</strong> the difficult subject of who would inherit her valuable <strong>brooch</strong> collection. <br /> <br /> </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>For words that sound the same but are spelt differently, pronounce each word phonetically. </strong><br /> <br /> For example: <br /> <br /> <ul> <li>Emphasise the ‘e’ sound in ‘counsel’ and the ‘i’ sound in ‘council’. <br /> <br /> </li> <li>Emphasise the ‘a’ sound in ‘affect’ and the ‘e’ sound in ‘effect’. <br /> <br /> </li> <li>Pronounce the silent ‘b’ in ‘plumb’ and compare it to the lack of ‘b’ in ‘plum’. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>You can then <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">come up with mnemonics</a> to help you connect the different spellings to their meanings. </p> <p>For example: </p> </blockquote> <ul> <ul> <li>The ‘el’ sound in a phonetic pronunciation of ‘counsel’ also appears in ‘help’. <br /> <br /> </li> <li>The ‘i’ sound in a phonetic pronunciation of ‘council’ also appears in ‘city’. <br /> <br /> </li> <li>The ‘a’ sound in a phonetic pronunciation of ‘affect’ also appears in ‘action’. <br /> <br /> </li> <li>The ‘e’ sound in a phonetic pronunciation of ‘effect’ also appears in ‘end result’. <br /> <br /> </li> </ul> <li> <strong>Look up the <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">etymology</a> of the words you are learning to spell. </strong><br /> <br /> Knowing the root of a word can often help prompt you to remember a more unusual spelling. <br /> <br /> For example: <br /> <br /> <ul> <li>The word ‘plumber’ comes from the Latin ‘plumbum’ which means ‘lead (the metal), lead ball; pipe’. This might help you remember the silent ‘b’ in ‘plumb’ (which doesn’t appear in ‘plum’, the word we use to describe the stoned fruit). <br /> <br /> </li> <li>Both the words ‘heal’ and ‘healthy’ come from the Old English ‘hælan’ which means ‘cure; save; make whole, sound and well’. This might help you remember that ‘heal’ is spelt with an ‘ea’ (and not ‘ee’ like in ‘heel’, the word we use to describe the back part of the foot). <br /> <br /> </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong> Use visual aids to help you remember the meanings of different homophones.</strong><br /> <br /> For example: <br /> <br /> <ul> <li> Draw a woman in a <strong>ball</strong> gown kicking a foot<strong>ball</strong>. <br /> <br /> </li> <li>Draw three <strong>witches</strong> with a question mark above to ask the question ‘<strong>which </strong>witch?’ <br /> <br /> </li> <li>Draw a <strong>rein</strong>deer in the <strong>rain</strong>. Perhaps even add a crown between its antlers to show that it’s a <strong>reign</strong>ing <strong>rein</strong>deer in the <strong>rain</strong>. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>If you want to practise with homophones, why not check out our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=homophone&Search=Search">word lists</a>? If you’re feeling brave, you can even try out our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/games/witch/index.cfm?wordlist=4664&speed=2">Which Witch</a> game. </p> <p>Have a good week!</p> Tue, 07 Mar 2017 17:56:02 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Tips%5Ffor%5FHandling%5FHomophones word classes, word class, English sentences, adjectives, adverbs, nouns, verbs, conjunctions, determiners, exclamations, prepositions, pronouns, connective words, determiner, interjection, prepositions Word Classes: Part 2 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Word%5FClasses%3A%5FPart%5F2 <p>A word class is the category we assign a word to in order to show how it functions in a sentence. In the first part of this article, we looked at adjectives, adverbs, nouns, and verbs. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">here</a> to read it.</p> <p>This week we’re looking at conjunctions, determiners, exclamations, prepositions and pronouns.</p> <p><strong>Conjunction</strong></p> <p>A conjunction is a word used to connect different parts of a sentence. Conjunctions are sometimes called ‘connective words’.</p> <p> Here are some examples of conjunctions functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Sarah threw the ball, <strong>but</strong> Thomas dropped it. </li> <li>The teachers might have to reschedule the picnic <strong>if</strong> it rains, <strong>or</strong> perhaps they’ll plan another activity instead. </li> <li>My dream is to go to Australia <strong>and</strong> see the kangaroos. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Determiner</strong></p> <p>A determiner introduces a noun.</p> <p>Here are some examples of determiners functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Sarah threw <strong>a</strong> ball to Thomas. </li> <li><strong>Every</strong> week the school hosts a picnic, but <strong>this</strong> week it was cancelled because of the rain. </li> <li>My dream is to go to Australia and see <strong>the</strong> kangaroos. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Exclamation</strong></p> <p>An exclamation or interjection is used to express a strong emotion. </p> <p>Here are some examples of determiners functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Sarah threw a ball to Thomas. ‘<strong>Oops!</strong>’ Thomas said as it slipped from his fingers and rolled away. </li> <li>‘<strong>Oh no!</strong>’ said the teacher. ‘<strong>It’s raining!</strong> We’ll have to cancel the picnic.’ </li> <li>‘<strong>It’s a dream come true!</strong>’ I said when I finally saw the kangaroos. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Pronoun</strong></p> <p>A pronoun is a word used to avoid repeating a noun that has been mentioned before.</p> <p> Here are some examples of pronouns functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li><strong>She</strong> threw the ball to Thomas. <strong>He</strong> dropped it. </li> <li>It rained so <strong>they</strong> cancelled the picnic. Henry struggled to hide <strong>his</strong> disappointment. </li> <li>My dream is to go <strong>there</strong> and see the kangaroos, but I have a fear of flying and need to find <strong>something</strong> to help me get over <strong>it</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Pronouns can be divided further depending on their role in a sentence and we’ll look at types of pronouns in more detail in a future blog post.</p> <p><strong>Preposition</strong></p> <p>A preposition is used to show the relationship between a noun (or pronoun) and other words in the sentence. They might describe the position of something, when something happens, or how something happens.</p> <p>Here are some examples of prepositions functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li>She threw the ball to Thomas. <strong>After</strong> dropping it a few times, he finally managed to catch it. </li> <li> It rained <strong>on</strong> Saturday so they cancelled the picnic. Henry struggled to hide his disappointment. </li> <li><strong>Despite</strong> my fear of flying, I want to see kangaroos in Australia. Perhaps I can listen to calming music <strong>during</strong> the flight. </li> </ul> <p>Have a good week!</p> Mon, 27 Feb 2017 16:32:54 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Word%5FClasses%3A%5FPart%5F2 word classes, words within a sentence, functions of word classes, adjective, adverb, conjunction, determiner, exclamation, noun, pronoun, preposition, verb, commonly confused words, naming words, proper noun Word Classes: Part 1 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Word%5FClasses%3A%5FPart%5F1 <p>Often, in our Commonly Confused Words and Word for Wednesday blog posts, we use word classes to describe the way a word functions within a sentence. Over the next couple of weeks, we’re going back to the drawing board. What are the main word classes? What are their functions? <p>There are nine main word classes: adjective, adverb, conjunction, determiner, exclamation, noun, pronoun, preposition, and verb. While this list might look daunting, it is very likely that you are already using words within each of these classes instinctively and correctly. Knowing the names of the word classes is useful for describing what a word is doing in a sentence and for helping you tell apart commonly confused words. <p>Let’s take a look at nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs! <p><strong>Noun</strong> <p>A noun is a word that identifies. Nouns are sometimes described as ‘naming’ words. Nouns are used to identify people, places, things, ideas, emotions, qualities, etc. In English, the term ‘proper noun’ or ‘proper name’ is used to describe the names of people, places, and organisations. Proper nouns should be capitalised. Here are some examples of nouns functioning in sentences: <ul> <li> <strong>Sarah</strong> threw the <strong>ball </strong>to <strong>Thomas</strong>. </li> <li><strong>Henry</strong> struggled to hide his <strong>disappointment</strong>.</li> <li>My dream is to go to <strong>Australia</strong> and see the <strong>kangaroos</strong>. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Verb</strong></p> <p>A verb is a word that describes what happens or what a person or thing does. Verbs are sometimes described as ‘doing words’. A verb might be used to describe an action, a change, an event, a situation, etc.</p> <p>Here are some examples of verbs functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Sarah <strong>threw</strong> the ball to Thomas. Thomas <strong>dropped</strong> it. </li> <li> It <strong>rained</strong> so the teachers <strong>cancelled</strong> the picnic. Henry <strong>struggled </strong>to hide his disappointment. </li> <li> My dream <strong>is</strong> to go to Australia and <strong>see</strong> the kangaroos, but first I <strong>need</strong> to <strong>conquer</strong> my fear of flying. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Adjective</strong></p> <p>An adjective adds extra information to a sentence by describing a noun. Adjectives are sometimes called ‘describing words’.</p> <p>Here are some examples of adjectives functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Sarah threw her <strong>green</strong> ball to Thomas.</li> <li><strong>Heavy </strong>rain was predicted so the teachers cancelled the <strong>weekly</strong> picnic. </li> <li>My dream is to go to <strong>sunny</strong> Australia and see all the kangaroos in their<strong> natural </strong>habitat. </li> </ul> <p><strong> Adverb</strong></p> <p> An adverb adds extra information to a sentence by describing a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. Adverbs often end in ‘ly’.</p> <p>Here are some examples of adverbs functioning in sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Sarah <strong>gently </strong>threw the ball to Thomas. Thomas dropped it <strong>clumsily</strong>. </li> <li>It rained <strong>heavily</strong> so the teachers cancelled the picnic. </li> <li>The girl <strong>bravely </strong>conquered her <strong>truly</strong> terrible fear of flying so she could fulfil her dream of visiting kangaroos in Australia. </li> </ul> <p>Next week we’ll take a look at conjunctions, determiners, exclamations, prepositions, and pronouns. </p> <p>Stay tuned!</p> Mon, 20 Feb 2017 22:07:17 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Word%5FClasses%3A%5FPart%5F1 Idioms about love, Happy Valentine’s Day, valentine’s, match made in heaven, birds of a feather flock together, blind date, head over heels, lovey-dovey, puppy love, get hitched, married, wedding ceremony, to tie the knot Thirty Idioms about Love http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Thirty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FLove <p>Happy Valentine’s Day! To celebrate, we’re looking at thirty idioms about love. </p> <ol> <ol> <li><strong>a match made in heaven</strong> – a relationship/pairing in which each member/part perfectly complements the other </li> <li><strong>an item</strong> – a couple who are involved in an established relationship </li> <li><strong>better half</strong> – partner/spouse </li> <li><strong>birds of a feather flock together</strong> – people who have the same outlook/tastes/interests will be found in each other’s company </li> <li><strong>blind date</strong> –a meeting between two people who do not know each other, arranged in the hope that a romance might develop between them </li> <li><strong>double date</strong> – a social occasion attended by two couples </li> <li><strong>head over heels</strong> – intensely in love </li> <li><strong>love is blind</strong> – when you love someone, you no longer see/care about their faults</li> <li><strong>love me, love my dog</strong> – if you love someone you must accept everything about them including their faults </li> <li><strong> lovey-dovey</strong> – romantic and affectionate (often excessively so) </li> <li><strong>other half </strong>– partner/spouse </li> <li><strong>puppy love</strong> – intense, new, and usually superficial love (often said in reference to love experienced by teenagers) </li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/You_are_the_Apple_of_My_Eye.htm"> the apple of someone’s eye</a></strong> – the person someone adores </li> <li><strong>those three little words</strong> – the words ‘I love you’ </li> <li><strong>to be hung up on someone</strong> – to long for/be obsessed with someone </li> <li> <strong>to fall for</strong> – to fall in love with</li> <li><strong> to (take a) fancy (to) someone</strong> – to become fond of/attracted to someone </li> <li><strong> to fix/set someone up</strong> – to arrange a meeting between two people in the hope that they might develop a romantic connection </li> <li><strong> to get hitched</strong> – to get married </li> <li><strong>to go Dutch</strong> – to equally share the cost of something (usually a meal) </li> <li><strong>to go steady with someone</strong> – to be in a relationship with someone </li> <li><strong> to have a crush on someone</strong> – to be attracted to someone</li> <li><strong> to hit it off</strong> – to immediately get on with someone </li> <li><strong> to pop the question </strong>– to propose marriage </li> <li><strong> to say ‘I do!’</strong> – to agree to marriage (in reference to making vows in the wedding ceremony)</li> <li><strong> to settle down with someone</strong> – to adopt a steady and stable lifestyle with someone (sometimes after marriage and with the intention of having children) </li> <li> <strong>to take someone’s breath away</strong> – to inspire the feeling of awe in someone </li> <li><strong>to tie the knot </strong>– to marry </li> <li><strong>to whisper sweet nothings</strong> – to whisper words of affection </li> <li><strong> two’s company, three’s a crowd</strong> – two people, especially two people who are in love, should be left alone </li> </ol> <p>If you’ve found this post useful, why not check out our other articles on idioms?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/You_are_the_Apple_of_My_Eye.htm">‘You’re the Apple of my Eye’</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Tue, 14 Feb 2017 23:00:40 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Thirty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FLove spell four vowel sounds, long /a/ sound, long /e/ sound, long /i/ sound, long /o/ sound, homophones, tips for learning spelling, learn about spelling, online spelling course Four Ways to Spell the Long U Sound http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Four%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FU%5FSound <p>One of the reasons why <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_reasons_why_English_spelling_is_so_difficult.htm">English spelling is so difficult to learn</a> is because, a lot of the time, the same sound is spelled in a variety of ways. In the past we’ve shared blog posts on how to spell the four other vowel sounds: the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_A_Sound.htm">long /a/ sound</a>, the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_Seven_Ways_of_Spelling_the_Long_E_Sound.htm">long /e/ sound</a>, the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_I_Sound.htm">long /i/ sound</a>, and the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_O_Sound.htm">long /o/ sound</a> – this week we’re finishing the series with how to spell the long /u/ sound.</p> <p>The long /u/ sound is pronounced like the word ‘you’. Here are four ways of spelling it:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Just the Letter U </strong><br /> Some words spell the long /u/ sound with just the letter <strong>u</strong>. These words are usually more than one syllable long with the long /u/ sound in the first syllable.<br /> <br /> Here are some examples: <ul> <li><strong>u</strong>nicorn </li> <li><strong>u</strong>nion </li> <li> <strong>u</strong>niversity </li> <li><strong>u</strong>tility </li> <li>c<strong>u</strong>pid </li> <li>d<strong>u</strong>ty </li> <li>f<strong>u</strong>ture </li> <li>h<strong>u</strong>man <br /> <br /> </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>A – E Words</strong> <br /> Many words spell the long /u/ sound with a <strong>u</strong> in the middle of the word and an <strong>e</strong> at the end of the word. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples: <ul> <li>c<strong>u</strong>t<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>m<strong>u</strong>l<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>p<strong>u</strong>r<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>t<strong>u</strong>b<strong>e</strong></li> <li> ab<strong>u</strong>s<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>ass<strong>u</strong>m<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>caps<strong>u</strong>l<strong>e</strong> </li> <li> fort<strong>u</strong>n<strong>e</strong> </li> </ul> </li> </ol> <blockquote> <p> You can practise spelling u – e words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=249">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=250">here</a>. </p> </blockquote> <ol> <li value="3"><strong>UE Words</strong> <br /> At the end of some words, the long /u/ sound is spelled with the letters <strong>ue</strong>. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples: <ul> <li>c<strong>ue</strong> </li> <li> d<strong>ue</strong> </li> <li>h<strong>ue</strong> </li> <li>que<strong>ue</strong> </li> <li>arg<strong>ue</strong> </li> <li>iss<strong>ue</strong> </li> <li>val<strong>ue</strong> </li> <li>barbeq<strong>ue</strong></li> </ul> </li> </ol> <blockquote> <p>You can practise spelling ue words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=251">here</a>. </p> </blockquote> <ol> <li value="4"><strong>EW Words </strong><br /> The long /u/ sound is spelled with the letters <strong>ew</strong> at the end of some words. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples: <ul> <li>br<strong>ew</strong> </li> <li>curf<strong>ew</strong> </li> <li>d<strong>ew</strong> </li> <li>neph<strong>ew</strong> </li> <li>n<strong>ew</strong> </li> <li>ph<strong>ew</strong> </li> <li>st<strong>ew</strong> </li> <li>vi<strong>ew</strong> </li> </ul> <p>You can practise spelling ew words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=252">here</a>. <br /> </p> </li> </ol> <p> There are a few homophones among words spelt with a long /u/ sound and you can read about them <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit07/page26.cfm">here</a>. To help stop yourself from mixing these words up, click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Learning_Spelling.htm">here</a> for our top tips for learning spelling and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics">here</a> to learn how to create your own mnemonics. If you’d like to learn more about spelling the long /u/ sound, have a look at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit07/page1.cfm">Unit 7</a> on our online spelling course. Subscribe to Spellzone for extra advice and plenty of practice. </p> <p>Do you have any spelling or grammar rules you would like us to take a look at on the blog? Leave a comment, or contact us on <a href="https://twitter.com/spellzone">Twitter</a> or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Spellzone">Facebook</a>, and we’ll try and incorporate your suggestions into our future posts. </p> <p>Have a good week!</p> Tue, 07 Feb 2017 17:40:39 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Four%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FU%5FSound commas as part of a list, commas confusing, commas, parts of a sentence, serial comma, last comma in a list, Oxford commas, semi colons as well as commas, articles about punctuation, how to use a semi colon, how to use apostrophes, using apostrophes How to Use Commas as Part of a List http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5FUse%5FCommas%5Fas%5FPart%5Fof%5Fa%5FList <p>Do you find commas confusing? Don’t worry – you’re not alone. Commas have a variety of functions yet many people are uncertain of how to use them. The main purpose of a comma is to clarify meaning by grouping together specific parts of the sentence. Each group within the sentence is separated by a comma which marks a slight break.</p> <p>Over the year we’ll share tips and advice on the different uses of a comma. This week we’re starting with how to use commas as part of a list.</p> <p><strong>A comma should be used between the different parts of a list.</strong></p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li>We need to buy potatoes, spinach, soap, and nail polish remover. </li> <li>Next week I’m working on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Do I need to use a serial comma? </strong></p> <p>The last comma in a list (which appears before the word ‘and’) is called a serial or Oxford commas. Some people prefer not to use this comma unless the meaning of the sentence is affected. </p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li>My favourite foods are jacket potatoes, quiche, spaghetti and fish and chips. </li> </ul> <p>In the above sentence (which doesn’t have a serial comma), it isn’t clear whether the person is listing ‘fish’ and ‘chips’ as separate types of favourite food or if they are listing ‘fish and chips’ in combination as a type of meal. </p> <p>A serial comma would help clear things up: </p> <ul> <li>My favourite foods are jacket potatoes, quiche, spaghetti<strong>,</strong> fish, and chips. </li> </ul> <p>In this case, ‘fish’ is one type of favourite food and ‘chips’ are another. </p> <ul> <li>My favourite foods are jacket potatoes, quiche, spaghetti, and fish and chips. </li> </ul> <p>In this case, ‘fish and chips’ together are a type of favourite food. </p> <p><strong>What if I need to use commas within the separate parts of my list?</strong></p> <p>In some lists, you may need to use semi colons, as well as commas, to create a stronger break.</p> <p> For example: </p> <ul> <li>Each student requires two pairs of shoes, including wellington boots<strong>;</strong> a waterproof jacket, which should have a hood<strong>;</strong> a change of clothes<strong>;</strong> and sun cream which has a rating of at least SPF 30. </li> <li> My family have had a very unlucky week: my mother’s purse was stolen, which means she had to cancel and replace all her cards<strong>;</strong> my father broke his leg a few days later and is now in a plaster cast<strong>;</strong> and my sister found out her cat, Michaela, had run away. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other articles about punctuation? </strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm">How to Use a Semi Colon</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">When to Use Capital Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shoulda%2C_Coulda%2C_Woulda-cc_Using_Apostrophes_to_Indicate_Missing_Letters">How to Use Apostrophes to Indicate Missing Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">Ten Tips for Using Apostrophes</a> </li> </ul> <p>Stay tuned for more advice on how to use commas. Have a great week! </p> Tue, 31 Jan 2017 15:29:50 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5FUse%5FCommas%5Fas%5FPart%5Fof%5Fa%5FList confusing english words, verbs, adverse, averse, Corn Flakes, Coco Pops, Cheerios, Corn Pops, cereal, serial, ascent, assent, born, borne, council, counsel, ensure, insure, heal, heel, pore, pour Commonly Confused Words: A Quick Reference Guide: Part 2 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FA%5FQuick%5FReference%5FGuide%3A%5FPart%5F2 <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_Quick_Reference_Guide.htm">here</a> for Commonly Confused Words: A Quick Reference Guide: Part 1 <table width="643" border="0"> <tr> <th width="159" valign="top" scope="col"><div align="left">Confusing Words</div></th> <th width="474" valign="top" scope="col"><div align="left">Tricks To Help You Tell Them Apart</div></th> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of the following sentences to help you remember that <strong>adverse</strong> relates to <em>conditions</em> and <strong>averse</strong> relates to <em>people</em>: </p> <ul> <li>The <strong>d</strong>rugs had a<strong>d</strong>verse si<strong>d</strong>e effects. </li> <li>The a<strong>d</strong>verse weather conditions ruined our <strong>d</strong>ay. </li> <li>Even though she had a terrible voice, she wasn’t a<strong>verse</strong> to singing the <strong>verse</strong>.<br /> </li> </ul></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></td> <td valign="top"><p><strong>A</strong>ffect is a verb and is used to describe an <em><strong>a</strong>ction</em>. <br /> <br /> <strong>E</strong>ffect is a noun and is used to describe the <em><strong>e</strong>nd consequenc<strong>e</strong></em>. <br /> <br /> Think of the phrase ‘caus<strong>e</strong> and <strong>e</strong>ffect’ – use the <strong>E</strong> at the end of cause to remind you that you need to begin the word <strong>e</strong>ffect with an <strong>E</strong> too. </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Ahttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_All_together_vs._Altogether.htm">All together vs. Altogether</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of <strong>altogether</strong> as one complete word (rather than two words like <strong>all together</strong>) to remind you it means <em>completely</em>. <br /> <br /> Remember you need to use the words <strong>all</strong> and <strong>together</strong> <em>at the same time</em> to spell <strong>all together</strong>. <br /> <br /> Come up with a sentence that will help you work out what the meaning of each spelling. For example: ‘The class practises spelling <strong>all together</strong> and <strong>altogether</strong> it’s taken them just a few weeks to improve.’ <br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>An <strong>ascent</strong> is a <em>climb</em>. Both words are spelled with the letter <strong>C</strong>. <br /> <br /> Someone who agrees to do something might say, ‘<strong>S</strong>ure!’ Both <strong>sure</strong> and as<strong>s</strong>ent are spelled with the letter <strong>S</strong>. <br /> <br /> Say to yourself, ‘The two <strong>S</strong>s must <em>agree</em> to stand next to each other in order to spell <strong>assent</strong>.’ <br /> <br /> Think of the <strong>C</strong> in <strong>ascent</strong> as a slope to help you remember what the word means. </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brohttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>A synonym for <strong>lend</strong> is <em><strong>l</strong>oan</em> – both words begin with the letter <strong>L</strong>. <br /> <br /> “Whatever you <strong>borrow</strong>, you must return tom<strong>orrow</strong>.” Use this rhyme to remember that <strong>borrow</strong> refers to <em>taking</em> rather than giving. <br /> <br /> “You <strong>lend</strong> to a fri<strong>end</strong>.” Use this rhyme to remember that lend refers to <em>giving</em> rather than taking. <br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Bhttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Born<strong>e</strong> is the past participle of the verb ‘to b<strong>e</strong>ar’. Both words are spelt with the letter <strong>E</strong>. </p> <p>If something is <strong>borne</strong>, it is carried. Think of the word born<strong>e</strong> as carrying an extra letter <strong>E</strong>. </p> <p><br /> Think of a new-<strong>born</strong> baby as being the smallest version of a human. When you are writing about someone being <strong>born</strong>, you need the smaller of the two possible words.<br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Shttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of the following sentence: ‘He needed to report the <strong>roach</strong> infestation to his landlord, but found it a difficult subject to b<strong>roach</strong>.’ <br /> <br /> Think of two people in a secret club wearing matching circle-shaped <strong>brooches</strong>, to help you remember that the word is spelt with two <strong>O</strong>s. <br /> </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dehttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Can_vs._May.htm">Can vs. May</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of the word <strong>c</strong>apable to help you remember that <strong>can</strong> means <em>to be able to </em>– both words begin with <strong>C</strong>. <br /> <br /> Think of this sentence to help you remember to use <strong>may</strong> when requesting permission: “<strong>May</strong> I have another <strong>can</strong> of Pepsi?” The word can should only appear in the sentence once. <br /> </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fhttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>The word <strong>s</strong>erial refers to something that happens <em>in a <strong>s</strong>eries</em>. Both words begin with the letter <strong>S</strong>. <br /> <br /> Think of breakfast <strong>c</strong>ereals beginning with the letter <strong>C</strong> to help you remember the spelling. For example: <strong>C</strong>orn Flakes, <strong>C</strong>oco Pops, <strong>C</strong>heerios, <strong>C</strong>orn Pops. <br /> <br /> I <strong>real</strong>ly love <strong>c</strong>e<strong>real</strong> – <strong>C</strong>heerios are my favourite. </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Lhttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>He told c<strong>oarse</strong> jokes until his voice was h<strong>oarse</strong>.<br /> <br /> The last four letters of <strong>coarse</strong> make up a rather <strong>coarse</strong> word… <br /> <br /> At <strong>u</strong>niversity you can study on various co<strong>u</strong>rses. <br /> <br /> Think of the <strong>u</strong> in co<strong>u</strong>rse as an empty bowl to help you remember that the word refers to parts of a meal. </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Council_vs._Counsel.htm">Council vs. Counsel</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of coun<strong>c</strong>il and coun<strong>s</strong>el as part of <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs">this group of words</a>. Nouns are spelt with a <strong>C</strong> in the middle and verbs are spelt with an <strong>S</strong>. <br /> <br /> Use the words ‘<strong>ci</strong>ty coun<strong>ci</strong>l’ to help you remember that coun<strong>ci</strong>l is spelt with the letters <strong>ci</strong>. <br /> </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proschttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of the two <strong>UE</strong>s q<strong>ueu</strong>ing up after the Q. If it helps, invent two people with the initials ‘UE’ who you wouldn’t want to be stuck in a line with, e.g. <strong>U</strong>gly <strong>E</strong>mma and <strong>U</strong>nbearable <strong>E</strong>ric.</p> <p>Think of a <strong>cue</strong> as the <strong>cu</strong>r<strong>e</strong> for forgetfulness. </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Qhttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Dear vs. Deer</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>D<strong>ear</strong> has the word <strong>ear</strong> in it. Come up with a sentence using both words to help you remember how to spell the word. For example: ‘I’ve bought my d<strong>ear</strong> grandmother <strong>ear</strong>rings for Christmas.’ </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Statiohttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Diffuse</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>A bomb <strong>def</strong>initely needs to be <strong>def</strong>used. </p> <p>I like Science, but <strong>diff</strong>usion was a <strong>diff</strong>icult topic.<br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of the word <strong>drawer</strong> as the piece of furniture it describes: the first part of the word – <strong>draw</strong> – is the cabinet, and the <strong>er</strong> on the end is the box that is pulled out from it.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>To help you remember that <strong>insure</strong> is spelt with an <strong>I</strong>, remember that you take out <strong>in</strong>surance <strong>in</strong> case something goes wrong.<br /> <br /> Think of a name beginning with <strong>E</strong> and an object beginning with <strong>I</strong> and use them in a sentence which will help you remember the difference between these two words. For example: ‘<strong>E</strong>mma <strong>e</strong>nsured she <strong>i</strong>nsured her new <strong>i</strong>Pod in case it got lost or broken.’<br /> </p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></td> <td valign="top"><strong>Heal</strong>th and <strong>heal</strong>thy both contain the word <strong>heal</strong>. To <strong>heal</strong> is to make/become <strong>heal</strong>thy. <br /> <br /> Remember that <strong>heels</strong> come on things that exist in pairs (feet, shoes, socks) to help you remember that the word is spelt with a pair of <strong>E</strong>s. <br /></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>If in doubt, use <strong>might</strong>.</p> <p>Both migh<strong>t</strong> and no<strong>t</strong> end in <strong>T</strong> - use this to help you remember to use <strong>might</strong> when talking about a possibility that did <strong>not</strong> end up happening.<br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></td> <td valign="top"><p>Think of the <strong>O</strong> in p<strong>o</strong>re as a small hole to help you remember that the word refers to a tiny hole in the surface of the skin. </p> <p>The <strong>U</strong> in po<strong>u</strong>r is the same shape as a cup. Imagine <strong>pouring</strong> water into the <strong>u</strong> to help you remember the word is spelt with that letter.<br /> </p></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></td> <td valign="top">Think of the rhyme ‘R<strong>a</strong>in r<strong>a</strong>in go <strong>a</strong>way, come <strong>a</strong>gain <strong>a</strong>nother d<strong>a</strong>y!’ to help you remember that r<strong>a</strong>in is spelt with an <strong>A</strong>.<br /> <br /> Think of a king or queen having a ‘<strong>g</strong>reat rei<strong>g</strong>n’ to help you remember that rei<strong>g</strong>n is spelt with a silent <strong>g</strong>. <br /> <br /> Say ‘the r<strong>eig</strong>n of Henry the<strong> Eig</strong>hth’ to yourself to help you remember how to spell the middle of the word r<strong>eig</strong>n. <br /> <br /> If you need to <strong>rein in</strong> something, you need to <em>restrain it</em> or keep it under control. Use the beginning and end of <strong>res</strong>tra<strong>in</strong> to help you remember how to spell <strong>rein</strong>.<br /></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></td> <td valign="top">T<strong>ale</strong> has the word <strong>ale</strong> in it. Think of the sentence: ‘They gathered at the pub to drink <strong>ale</strong> and tell <strong>tales</strong>.’ <br /> <br /> A tale is often finished with the words ‘The <strong>E</strong>nd’. Tal<strong>e</strong> <strong>e</strong>nds with the letter <strong>e</strong>. <br /> <br /> A tai<strong>l</strong>, which is the <strong>l</strong>ast part of an anima<strong>l</strong>, ends with the letter <strong>l</strong>. <br /> <br /> Picture the word <strong>Tail</strong> as an animal. The top of the <strong>T</strong> is the animal’s head and the <strong>I</strong> is the animal’s <strong>tail</strong>. <br /></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top"><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who%27s_vs._Whose.htm">Who’s vs. Whose</a></td> <td valign="top">Replace the word you are trying to spell with the words ‘who is’. If the sentence makes sense, use <strong>who’s</strong> and if it doesn’t, use <strong>whose</strong>. </td> </tr> </table> </p> Mon, 23 Jan 2017 18:42:14 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FA%5FQuick%5FReference%5FGuide%3A%5FPart%5F2 Janus words, January, Janus the god of beginnings and transitions, words with contradictory meanings, contronyms, auto antonyms, word lists, first-degree murder, peer, nobility, peerage Janus Words http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Janus%5FWords <p> If you’ve read our blog post on where we get our names for the months of the year from, you will know that the month ‘January’ takes its name from Janus the god of beginnings and transitions. Janus’s image – usually depicted with two heads, one looking back into the past and the other looking forward into the future – is often found carved over doorways and gates.</p> <p>A Janus word is a word with contradictory meanings. These words are also known as contronyms and auto antonyms. </p> <p>Here are 20 examples of Janus words used in sentences: </p> <ol> <li><strong>Bolt</strong>: to fasten/secure, to flee <ul> <li>We <strong>bolt</strong> the door at night. </li> <li>The cat <strong>bolted</strong> away. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Bound</strong>: to tie someone or something to a particular spot or thing, to (prepare to) go to a specific place <ul> <li>They were <strong>bound</strong> forever by the wonderful memories they shared. </li> <li>He’s <strong>bound</strong> for Europe next month. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Clip</strong>: to attach, to cut <ul> <li>She <strong>clipped</strong> the pages together to stop any from getting lost.</li> <li>The hairdresser <strong>clipped</strong> a little too much of my hair off. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Dust</strong>: to remove dust, to add (metaphorical) dust <ul> <li>He made sure to <strong>dust</strong> the house before his parents came to visit. </li> <li>He <strong>dusted</strong> the cake with icing sugar. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Fast</strong>: firmly fixed/attached, (capable of) moving fast <ul> <li>They remained <strong>fast</strong> friends. </li> <li>She was a <strong>fast </strong>swimmer. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Fine</strong>: excellent, satisfactory <ul> <li>There’s supposed to be <strong>fine</strong> weather on Saturday. </li> <li>The siblings had a <strong>fine</strong> relationship but they were by no means good friends. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>First degree</strong>: most severe, least severe <ul> <li>He was charged with <strong>first-degree</strong> murder. </li> <li>It was only a <strong>first-degree</strong> burn and my skin is already healing well. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Hold up</strong>: to support, to obstruct <ul> <li>He <strong>held</strong> his head <strong>up</strong> and faced his classmates despite knowing they were gossiping about him. </li> <li>He wanted to face up to his classmates who bullied him but his fear <strong>held </strong>him <strong>up</strong>. </li> </ul> </li> <li> <strong>Lease/Rent</strong>: to pay someone to use their property, to offer someone use of your property in exchange for payment <ul> <li>We <strong>leased/rented</strong> a house in France for our holiday. </li> <li>They <strong>lease/rent </strong>out their flat when they aren’t using it. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Left</strong>: to go away from, remaining <ul> <li>They <strong>left</strong> the party early. </li> <li>They were the last ones <strong>left</strong> at the party. </li> </ul> </li> <li> <strong>Mean</strong>: unkind/aggressive/spiteful, excellent <ul> <li>He wished his teacher wasn’t so <strong>mean</strong>. </li> <li>He makes a <strong>mean</strong> pasta bake. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Peer</strong>: a member on the nobility, an equal <ul> <li>In the UK the ranks of the <strong>peer</strong>age are duke, marquess, earl, viscount, and baron.</li> <li> My assignment will be marked by my <strong>peers</strong>. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Refrain</strong>: to desist, a repeated (number of) lines <ul> <li>Please <strong>refrain</strong> from smoking indoors. </li> <li>There’s a <strong>refrain</strong> at the end of each verse in the poem. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Seed</strong>: to sow seeds, to remove seeds <ul> <li>It is important to <strong>seed</strong> plants at the right time of year so that they can grow in the best conditions. </li> <li>Chop and <strong>seed</strong> the chillies before adding them to the sauce. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Strike</strong>: to hit/succeed, to miss/fail <ul> <li>They <strong>struck</strong> gold. </li> <li>He was <strong>struck</strong> out. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Transparent</strong>: invisible/see-through, apparent/obvious <ul> <li>We visited a beautiful beach with <strong>transparent</strong> waters. </li> <li>Her expression made her views <strong>transparent</strong>. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Trim</strong>: to decorate/adorn, to cut away excess <ul> <li> Each year the family gathers to <strong>trim</strong> the Christmas tree. </li> <li>The gardener <strong>trims </strong>the hedges frequently. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Wear</strong>: to deteriorate, able to withstand deterioration <ul> <li>My jeans always wear away at the knees. </li> <li>The dress has at least another year of wear left in it. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Weather</strong>: to withstand, to deteriorate <ul> <li>The ship is built to <strong>weather</strong> a storm. </li> <li>The cliffs have <strong>weathered</strong> over the years. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Wind up</strong>: to power something up to make it start, to gradually bring something to an end <ul> <li>You need to <strong>wind</strong> the toy train <strong>up</strong> to make it run. </li> <li>It’s time for the meeting to end– please <strong>wind up</strong> all discussions. </li> </ul> </li> </ol> <p>How many Janus words can you think of? </p> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 12:45:58 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Janus%5FWords Spelling goals, working on your spelling and grammar, Spellzone Spelling Ability Test, start a spelling log, difficult English words, word root, loan word, word lists, spelling tests, common spelling patterns, mnemonics, English spelling rules 17 Spelling and Grammar Goals for 2017 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=17%5FSpelling%5Fand%5FGrammar%5FGoals%5Ffor%5F2017 <p>Will 2017 be the year you start working on your spelling and grammar? We hope so!</p> <p>Here are seventeen spelling and grammar goals for 2017: </p> <ol> <li> <strong>Take the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/ability-test/index.cfm">Spellzone Spelling Ability Test</a></strong> <br /> New year, new start. Use our test to find out the best point for you to start the Spellzone course from. Find out more about how the test works <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Spelling_Ability_Test.htm">here</a>. </li> <li><strong>Complete at least one Spellzone unit a week</strong> <br /> If you’re feeling enthusiastic, set your target number of units per week even higher. </li> <li><strong>Begin a spelling log</strong> <br /> Create a log of the words you find difficult and learn as much as possible about them. If you know, for example, the word you are trying to spell is a loanword, you can assume it might not follow usual spelling rules. Or, if you know how a word is pronounced and what it means, you might be able to use a familiar word root to work out how to spell it. </li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Using_Spellzone_Word_Lists_as_Part_of_Your_Exam_Preparation.htm">Learn how to use the Spellzone word list feature</a> </strong><br /> Now that you know what some of your problem words are, learn how to use our wod list feature and practise spelling them. You can learn about our various spelling tests <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Tests_to_Make_Sure_Your_Spelling_is_in_Top_Shape_for_Exam_Time.htm">here</a>. </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm"><strong>Learn how to create your own mnemonics</strong></a> <br /> We all struggle to spell different words and we all have different methods that help us remember our spellings. Coming up with your own mnemonics will ensure you’re using methods that are suited to how your brain works. </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/games/index.cfm"><strong>Try out our spelling games</strong></a> <br /> Sometimes you need a break. </li> <li><strong>Read more</strong> <br /> You don’t need to read books – reading <em>anything</em> from food packets to comics will help you memorise the look of common spelling patterns. </li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/I_before_E_except_after_C-cc_The_Most_Famous_English_Spelling_Rule_and_its_Exceptions.htm">Get your head around the ‘I before E except after C’ spelling rule</a></strong> <br /> This is possibly the most famous English spelling rule, make sure you know how to apply it. </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Spelling_Words_with_Silent_Letters.htm"><strong>Learn these five tips for spelling words with silent letters</strong></a> <br /> Silent letters can be tricky. Don’t let them trip you up! </li> <li> <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Adding_Suffixes.htm"><strong>Learn the rules for adding suffixes to words</strong></a> <br /> Adding a suffix changes the meaning of a word – make sure you’re doing it correctly. </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm"><strong>Teach yourself the how to tell apart one set of commonly confused words a week<br /> </strong></a>Scroll to the bottom of each article to find a list confusing words we’ve looked at in the past. </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm"><strong>Make sure you’re using capital letters in the right places</strong></a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm"><strong>Learn how to use apostrophes correctly</strong></a> <br /> If you struggle with apostrophes, you’re certainly not alone. We can help! </li> <li> <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Forming_Plurals.htm"><strong>Learn how to form plurals correctly </strong></a><br /> A quick tip: don’t use apostrophes. </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Forming_Abbreviations.htm"><strong>Learn how to use abbreviations</strong></a> <br /> When should you use capital letters? When do you need an apostrophe? Learn the different types of abbreviations and how to write each type correctly. </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/10_Common_Mistakes.htm"><strong>Eradicate these common mistakes from your writing</strong></a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm"><strong>Learn how to use semi colons</strong></a> <br /> Semi colons are difficult – that’s why we’ve left them for last. Learn how to use them correctly and show off! </li> </ol> <p>What are your spelling and grammar goals this year? </p> Tue, 03 Jan 2017 18:19:53 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=17%5FSpelling%5Fand%5FGrammar%5FGoals%5Ffor%5F2017 happy new year, 2016, 2017, Spellzone, improve your spelling, English spelling course, spelling lists, spelling rules, English language, spelling tips, idioms 2016 Spellzone Blog Round Up http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=2016%5FSpellzone%5FBlog%5FRound%5FUp <p>Happy New Year!</p> <p>Whether you are a regular user of our site or someone who’s just signed up, we hope 2017 will be a great year for improving your spelling. If you’re feeling daunted, perhaps some of these <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five_Spelling_Resolutions_for_2015">spelling-related New Year’s resolutions</a> might help.</p> <p>In 2016, we launched a <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Spelling_Ability_Test.htm">new spelling ability test</a> to help users determine the best point to start our spelling course from. Here are some of our other favourite blog posts from over the year:</p> <ul> <li>As always we looked pairs and groups of words which are easy to mix up, and we shared tips and tricks to help you remember when to use which word. This year we looked at: <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">aisle vs. isle</a> , <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">affect vs. effect</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">coarse vs. course</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">cue vs. queue</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">adverse vs. averse</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">defuse vs. diffuse</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">tail vs. tale</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">draw vs. drawer</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">heal vs. heel</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Council_vs._Counsel.htm">council vs. counsel</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_All_together_vs._Altogether.htm">all together vs. altogether</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">rain vs. reign vs. rein</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">dear vs. deer</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">pore vs. pour</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who's_vs._Whose.htm">who’s vs. whose</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">born vs borne</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">dual vs. duel</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">cereal vs. serial</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">ascent vs. assent</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">broach vs. brooch</a>. </li> <li>To help our users who are learning English, we continued looking at the definitions of popular idioms in the English language. In 2016, we looked at useful idioms for the world of business (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">part one</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">part two</a>), <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">idioms about keeping and spilling secrets</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">idioms and expressions about luck and chance</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">idioms about talking</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">idioms about the sea</a>, idioms about travel and transport (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">part one</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">part two</a>),<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm"> idioms about baking</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">idioms about books and reading</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_and_Expressions_about_the_Theatre.htm">idioms and expressions about the theatre</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tis_the_Season_for_Christmassy_Idioms.htm">Christmassy idioms</a>. </li> <li>In 2016 we had a look at the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/I_before_E_except_after_C-cc_The_Most_Famous_English_Spelling_Rule_and_its_Exceptions.htm">English language’s most famous spelling rule and its exceptions</a> and how to spell <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_A_Sound.htm">the long /a/ sound</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_Seven_Ways_of_Spelling_the_Long_E_Sound.htm">long /e/ sound</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_I_Sound.htm">long /i/ sound</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_O_Sound.htm">long /o/ sound</a>. We also shared tips for <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Spelling_Words_with_Silent_Letters.htm">spelling words with silent letters</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">using capital letters</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Adding_Suffixes.htm">adding suffixes to change the meaning of a word</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Forming_Abbreviations.htm">forming abbreviations</a>. </li> <li>While exploring interesting aspects of the English language, we explored where our words for <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_History_of_Denim_and_Other_Cloth_from_Around_the_World.htm">types of cloth</a> originate from and learned what <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/What_is_the_correct_plural_of_'octopus'-qq.htm">the correct plural of ‘octopus’</a> is. Our Word for Wednesday feature included the words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Renew.htm">renew</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Button.htm">button</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Deal.htm">deal</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Mumuration.htm">mumuration</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Sugar.htm">sugar</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Health.htm">health </a></li> </ul> <p>What did you enjoy most on our blog last year, and what would you like to see more of this year? Which articles have you found the most useful? Do let us know so that we can make 2017’s articles the best we can. You can contact us via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Spellzone">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/spellzone">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/contact.cfm">email</a>, or by leaving a comment below. We would also love to hear what your 2017 spelling resolutions are. </p> <p>Once again, from all the team in Spellzone, we hope you have <a href="8477734">a </a><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-38477734">very happy new year</a>! </p> Sat, 31 Dec 2016 16:55:52 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=2016%5FSpellzone%5FBlog%5FRound%5FUp Christmas idioms, Grinch, white Christmas, snowy Christmas, bah humbug, Boxing Day, gift horse in the mouth, proof of the pudding, cold turkey, trimmings, decorations Tis the Season for Christmassy Idioms http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Tis%5Fthe%5FSeason%5Ffor%5FChristmassy%5FIdioms <p>This year, to get us in the festive spirit, we’ve made a list of all the Chritmassy expressions we could come up with – can you think of any others?</p> <ul> <li><strong>a grinch</strong> – a grumpy and mean-spirted person </li> <li><strong>a white Christmas</strong> – a snowy Christmas </li> <li><strong>all the trimmings</strong> – all the traditional accompaniments (usually used in reference to a meal)</li> <li> <strong>Bah humbug!</strong> – a phrase used to express grumpiness and disdain for Christmas </li> <li><strong>Boxing Day </strong>– the day after Christmas (which is a public holiday in Britain)</li> <li><strong>Christmas comes but once a year</strong> – since Christmas is celebrated only one time a year,we should make the most of the occasion (this expression is either used to persuade people to help those in need or to persuade people to indulge on food and treats) </li> <li><strong>don’t get your tinsel in a tangle</strong> – don’t stress yourself out by trying to make Christmas perfect </li> <li><strong>don’t look a gift horse in the mouth</strong> – don’t find fault in something that has been given to you as a gift </li> <li><strong>good things come in small packages</strong> – a present doesn’t need to be big in order to be good </li> <li><strong>it’s the thought that counts</strong> – the kindness behind an act is what’s important even if the act itself is considered imperfect</li> <li><strong> like turkeys voting for (an early) Christmas</strong> – an expression used to describe a particularly self-defeating action or decision</li> <li><strong>the more the merrier</strong> – the more people or things involved the better an occasion will be</li> <li> <strong>the proof of the pudding</strong> – the real value of something cannot be judged by its appearance or the theory behind it but must instead be judged on experience or results </li> <li><strong> to deck the halls</strong> – to festively decorate your home </li> <li><strong>to quit cold turkey </strong>– to abruptly and completely give something up </li> <li><strong>to trim the tree</strong> – to decorate the tree </li> <li><strong>trimmings</strong> – decorations </li> </ul> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles? </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Popular_Christmas_Characters.htm">Three Popular Christmas Characters</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/What_the_Dickens-qq.htm">What the Dickens?</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grottos,_caverns,_and_killing_curses.htm">Grottos, Caverns, and Curses</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_word_games_to_get_you_through_the_Christmas_season.htm">Christmas Games</a> </li> <li>Word for Wednesdays: <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Advent.htm">advent</a>, <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Pudding.htm">pudding</a>, and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Reindeer.htm">reindeer </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a> </li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms </a></li> <li> <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/%E2%80%A2Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart </a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li> Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time!.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm"> Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a></li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm"> Thirty Idioms about Food</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean</a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a> </li> <li> <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature </a></li> </ul> <p>From all the team at Spellzone, we hope you have a lovely Christmas and New Year! </p> Sat, 24 Dec 2016 10:01:00 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Tis%5Fthe%5FSeason%5Ffor%5FChristmassy%5FIdioms confusing english Words, Dear, Deer, word lists, , vocabulary lists, example english sentences, The Online Etymology Dictionary, Rudolph, reindeer, grandmother, earrings for Christmas, antlers, Christmas stories Commonly Confused Words: Dear vs. Deer http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FDear%5Fvs%2E%5FDeer <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p><strong>Dear</strong> is a term of endearment used to refer to a beloved person or to show affection to someone. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/dear">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>dear</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>‘Pass the salt, <strong>dear</strong>,’ said Timothy to his daughter. </li> <li>Her late aunt was very <strong>dear</strong> to her. </li> <li>A <strong>dear</strong> friend recommended this restaurant to me. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=dear&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>dear</strong>.</p> <p> <strong>Deer</strong> are a type of four-legged hoofed animal, the males of which are known for their branchy antlers.</p> <p> Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/deer">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>deer</strong> used in an example sentence: </p> <ul> <li>In Christmas stories, Rudolph is a rein<strong>deer</strong> who is famous for having a shiny red nose. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=deer&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>deer</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Dear</strong> has been used in English since the late fourteenth century. It comes from the Old English ‘<em>deore</em>’ meaning ‘<em>precious, valuable, costly, loved, beloved</em>’ which in turn comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘<em>deurjaz</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Deer</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>deor</em>’ meaning ‘<em>animal, beast</em>’ from the Proto-Germanic ‘<em>deuzam</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>D<strong>ear</strong> has the word <strong>ear</strong> in it. Come up with a sentence using both words to help you remember how to spell the word. For example: ‘I’ve bought my d<strong>ear</strong> grandmother <strong>ear</strong>rings for Christmas.’ </li> <li>Imagine the two <strong>e</strong>s in d<strong>ee</strong>r as a pair of antlers to help you remember how to spell the word. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 20 Dec 2016 09:01:05 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FDear%5Fvs%2E%5FDeer learn spelling, English spelling, long i sounds, spelling course, Spellzone, spelling tips, spelling practice, online spelling course, spelling resources, spelling activities, spelling games Six Ways to Spell the Long I Sound http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Six%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FI%5FSound <p>One of the reasons why <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_reasons_why_English_spelling_is_so_difficult.htm">English spelling is so difficult to learn</a> is because often the same sound is spelled in a variety of ways. In past blog posts we’ve looked at how to spell the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_A_Sound.htm">long /a/ sound</a>, the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_Seven_Ways_of_Spelling_the_Long_E_Sound.htm">long /e/ sound</a>, and the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_O_Sound.htm">long /o/ sound</a>.</p> <p>Here are the six ways of spelling the long /i/ sound:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Just the Letter I</strong> <br /> Some words spell the long /i/ sound with just the letter <strong>i</strong>. These words are usually more than one syllable long with the long /i/ sound is in the first syllable. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples: </li> <ul> <li><strong>i</strong>tem </li> <li> <strong>i</strong>dea </li> <li> <strong>i</strong>ron </li> <li> <strong>i</strong>rate </li> <li>cr<strong>i</strong>sis </li> <li> f<strong>i</strong>nal </li> <li> p<strong>i</strong>lot </li> <li>s<strong>i</strong>lent </li> </ul> </ol> <blockquote> <p>A few of the words that spell the long /i/ sound with just the letter <strong>i</strong> are only one syllable long. These words end with –<strong>i</strong>nd, for example: k<strong>i</strong>nd, m<strong>i</strong>nd, and w<strong>i</strong>nd. You can practise spelling –ind words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=237">here</a>. <br /> </p> </blockquote> <ol start="2"> <li><strong>A – E Words</strong> <br /> Most of the time the long /i/ sound is spelled with an <strong>i</strong> in the middle of the word and an <strong>e</strong> at the end of the word. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples: </li> <ul> <li>br<strong>i</strong>b<strong>e </strong></li> <li>w<strong>i</strong>d<strong>e </strong> </li> <li> l<strong>i</strong>f<strong>e </strong> </li> <li> h<strong>i</strong>k<strong>e </strong> </li> <li> reconc<strong>i</strong>l<strong>e </strong> </li> <li>t<strong>i</strong>m<strong>e</strong></li> <li>sh<strong>i</strong>n<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>gr<strong>i</strong>p<strong>e</strong> </li> </ul> </ol> <blockquote> <p>You can practise spelling i – e words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=222">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=223">here</a>. <br /> </p> </blockquote> <ol start="3"> <li> <strong>IGH Words</strong> <br /> Another way to spell the long /i/ sound is with the letters <strong>igh</strong>. In these words the <strong>g</strong> and <strong>h</strong> are silent letters. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples of the long /i/ sound spelled with the letters <strong>igh</strong>: </li> <ul> <li>h<strong>igh</strong> </li> <li>th<strong>igh</strong> </li> <li>br<strong>igh</strong>t </li> <li> kn<strong>igh</strong>t </li> <li>sl<strong>igh</strong>t </li> <li>n<strong>igh</strong>tmare </li> <li>twil<strong>igh</strong>t </li> <li>highl<strong>igh</strong>t </li> </ul> </ol> <blockquote> <p>You can practise spelling <strong>igh</strong> words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=233">here</a>. <br /> </p> </blockquote> <ol start="4"> <li><strong>IG Words</strong> <br /> A few words spell the long /i/ sound with the letters ig. These words end with the letter <strong>n</strong>. <br /> Here are some examples of long /a/ words spelled with the letter <strong>ig</strong>: </li> <ul> <li>s<strong>ig</strong>n </li> <li>res<strong>ig</strong>n </li> <li>des<strong>ig</strong>n </li> <li>cons<strong>ig</strong>n </li> <li>al<strong>ig</strong>n </li> <li>ass<strong>ig</strong>n </li> </ul> </ol> <blockquote> <p>You can practise spelling <strong>-ign</strong> words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=238">here</a>. <br /> </p> </blockquote> <ol start="5"> <li><strong>Y Words</strong> <br /> Often at the end of a word and sometimes in the middle of a word, the long /i/ sound is spelled with the letter <strong>y</strong>. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples: <ul> <li>b<strong>y</strong></li> <li>dr<strong>y</strong> </li> <li>sl<strong>y</strong> </li> <li>sh<strong>y</strong> </li> <li>appl<strong>y</strong> </li> <li>den<strong>y</strong> </li> <li>identif<strong>y</strong> </li> <li>multipl<strong>y</strong> </li> </ul> <p>You can practise spelling <strong>y</strong> words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=234">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=235">here</a>. <br /> </p> </li> <li><strong>IE Words</strong> <br /> In four words, the long /i/ sound is spelled with the letters <strong>ie</strong> at the end. More <strong>ie</strong> words are also made by adding a suffix to words ending with <strong>y</strong>. <ul> <li> t<strong>ie</strong> </li> <li>d<strong>ie</strong> </li> <li>l<strong>ie</strong> </li> <li>p<strong>ie</strong> </li> <li>appl<strong>ie</strong>d </li> <li>den<strong>ie</strong>d </li> <li>identif<strong>ie</strong>d </li> <li>multipl<strong>ie</strong>d </li> </ul> </li> </ol> <p>If you’d like to learn more about spelling long /i/ sounds, have a look at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit07/page1.cfm">Unit 7</a> on our online spelling course. <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/register.cfm">Subscribe to Spellzone</a> for extra tips and plenty of practice. </p> <p>Have a good week! </p> Wed, 14 Dec 2016 22:10:57 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Six%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FI%5FSound confusing english Words, Rain, Reign, Rein, word lists, , vocabulary lists, example english sentences, , The Online Etymology Dictionary, Henry the Eighth, Father Christmas, sleigh, Rudolph, reindeer, heavy rain Commonly Confused Words: Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FRain%5Fvs%2E%5FReign%5Fvs%2E%5FRein <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>The word <strong>rain</strong> is used as both a noun (to describe water that falls in drops from the vapour condensed in the atmosphere) and as a verb (to describe the act of water droplets falling from the sky). <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/rain">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>rain</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>The <strong>rain</strong> was heavy in the morning but slowed to a light drizzle by lunchtime. </li> <li>It <strong>rained</strong> heavily in the morning but at lunchtime the sun came out. </li> <li>The soldier dodged the bullets <strong>raining</strong> down on him and searched for cover.</li> </ul> <p> Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=rain&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>rain</strong>.</p> <p>As a noun, <strong>reign</strong> refers to the period during which someone or something is dominant or powerful. As a verb, it refers to the act of being in power.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=reign&Search=Search">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>reign</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The Great Fire of London happened during the <strong>reign</strong> of King Charles II. </li> <li>Queen Elizabeth II <strong>reigns</strong> over the United Kingdom. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/rein">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>reign</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Rein</strong> is also used as both a noun as a verb. As the former it refers to a long narrow strap that is used to control a horse or deer and the latter refers to the act of controlling, directing, or restraining something.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/rein">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>rein</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Father Christmas’s sleigh is pulled by <strong>rein</strong>deer. </li> <li>He shook the <strong>reins</strong> and his horse began to gallop. </li> <li> She <strong>reined</strong> in her horse. </li> <li>He <strong>reined</strong> in his anger.</li> </ul> <p> Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=rein&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>rein</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>Think of the rhyme ‘R<strong>a</strong>in r<strong>a</strong>in go away, come <strong>a</strong>gain <strong>a</strong>nother d<strong>a</strong>y!’ to help you remember that r<strong>a</strong>in is spelt with an <strong>a</strong>. </li> <li>Think of a king or queen having a ‘<strong>g</strong>reat rei<strong>g</strong>n’ to help you remember that rei<strong>g</strong>n is spelt with a silent <strong>g</strong>. </li> <li>Say ‘the R<strong>eig</strong>n of Henry the <strong>Eig</strong>hth’ to yourself to help you remember how to spell the middle of the word r<strong>eig</strong>n. </li> <li> If you need to <strong>rein in</strong> something, you need to restrain it or keep it under control. Use the word <strong>re</strong>strain to help you remember the first part of the word and the phrase <strong>rein in</strong> to help you remember that re<strong>in</strong> has the word <strong>in</strong> in it. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words? </strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%2Dcc%5FAll%5Ftogether%5Fvs%2E%5FAltogether.htm">All together vs. Altogether</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Council_vs._Counsel.htm">Council vs. Counsel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 06 Dec 2016 17:44:45 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FRain%5Fvs%2E%5FReign%5Fvs%2E%5FRein confusing english Words, altogether, word lists, all together, vocabulary lists, example english sentences, The Online Etymology Dictionary, dictionary definition, word definitions Commonly Confused Words: All together vs. Altogether http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FAll%5Ftogether%5Fvs%2E%5FAltogether <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p><strong>All together</strong> means ‘a<em>ll at the same time</em>’ or ‘<em>all in the same place</em>’. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/all_together">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>all together</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li> Because they shared a car, they <strong>all</strong> arrived at the function <strong>together</strong>. </li> <li>It was lovely to have the family <strong>all together</strong> again. </li> <li>We’ll perform the final number <strong>all together</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary lists featuring the word <strong>all together</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Altogether</strong> is an adverb that means ‘<em>completely</em>’ or ‘<em>in total</em>’. The word is also used to mean ‘o<em>n the whole</em>’.</p> <p> Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/altogether">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>altogether</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li> After his injury, he stopped playing tennis <strong>altogether</strong>. </li> <li>The training lasts five years <strong>altogether</strong>. </li> <li><strong>Altogether</strong> it was an excellent event. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=altogether&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>altogether</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>All</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>eall</em>’ which means ‘<em>all, every, entire’</em> (from the Proto Germanic ‘<em>alnaz</em>’) and <strong>together</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>togædere</em>’ which means ‘<em>so as to be present in one place, in a group, in an accumulated mass</em>’ (from the Proto Germanic ‘<em>gaduri</em>’ meaning ‘<em>in a body</em>’ from the PIE ‘<em>ghedh</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to unite, join, fit</em>’). </p> <p><strong>Altogether</strong> comes from ‘<em>altogedere</em>’ which is a stronger form of the word ‘<em>all</em>’ that dates back to the early thirteenth century. The word has been used to mean ‘<em>a whole</em>’ since the 1660s. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>Think of <strong>altogether</strong> as one complete word (rather than two words like <strong>all together</strong>) to remind you it means ‘<em>completely</em>’. </li> <li>Remember you need to use the words ‘<strong>all</strong>’ and ‘<strong>together</strong>’ both ‘at the same’ time to spell <strong>all together</strong>. </li> <li>Come up with a sentence that will help you work out what the meaning of each spelling. For example: ‘The class practises spelling <strong>all together</strong> and <strong>altogether</strong> it’s taken them just a few weeks to improve.’ </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words? </strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Council_vs._Counsel.htm">Council vs. Counsel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 16:41:43 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FAll%5Ftogether%5Fvs%2E%5FAltogether learn spelling, English spelling, long a sounds, spelling course, Spellzone, spelling tips, spelling practice, online spelling course, spelling resources, spelling activities, spelling games Six Ways to Spell the Long A Sound http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Six%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FA%5FSound <p>One of the reasons why <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_reasons_why_English_spelling_is_so_difficult.htm">English spelling is so difficult to learn</a> is because often the same sound is spelled in a variety of ways. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_Seven_Ways_of_Spelling_the_Long_E_Sound.htm">here</a> to read about the different ways to spell the long /e/ sound and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_O_Sound.htm">here</a> to read about the long /o/ sound. </p> <p>Here are the six ways of spelling the long /a/ sound: </p> <p><strong>1) Just the Letter A </strong></p> <p>Some words spell the long /a/ sound with just the letter <strong>a</strong>. </p> <p>Here are some example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>a</strong>corn </li> <li><strong>a</strong>pron </li> <li><strong>a</strong>lien </li> <li><strong>a</strong>gent </li> <li>b<strong>a</strong>sic </li> <li>b<strong>a</strong>sin </li> <li>d<strong>a</strong>ta </li> <li>f<strong>a</strong>tal </li> </ul> <p><strong>2) A – E Words </strong></p> <p>Sometimes, to spell the long /a/ sound, you use an <strong>a</strong> in the middle of the word and an <strong>e</strong> at the end.</p> <p>Here are some examples of long /a/ words spelled with an <strong>a</strong> in the middle of the word and an <strong>e</strong> at the end: </p> <ul> <li>sn<strong>a</strong>k<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>g<strong>a</strong>m<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>el<strong>a</strong>t<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>sh<strong>a</strong>v<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>gr<strong>a</strong>d<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>s<strong>a</strong>l<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>am<strong>a</strong>z<strong>e</strong> </li> <li>gr<strong>a</strong>p<strong>e</strong> </li> </ul> <p>This spelling rule does not always apply to <strong>a</strong>t<strong>e</strong> words where the a – e falls at the end of the word. For example, priv<strong>a</strong>t<strong>e</strong>, chocol<strong>a</strong>t<strong>e</strong>, and immedi<strong>a</strong>t<strong>e</strong> are all pronounced with a weak /u/ sound. </p> <p>You can practise spelling a – e words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=191">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=192">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>3) AI Words </strong></p> <p>After a – e words, the next most common way of spelling the long /a/ sound is with the letters <strong>ai</strong>. </p> <p>Here are some examples of the long/a/ sound spelled with the letters <strong>ai</strong>: </p> <ul> <li>tr<strong>ai</strong>n </li> <li>sn<strong>ai</strong>l </li> <li>w<strong>ai</strong>t </li> <li>p<strong>ai</strong>nt </li> <li>comp<strong>ai</strong>n </li> <li>ent<strong>ai</strong>l </li> <li><strong>ai</strong>m </li> <li>w<strong>ai</strong>st </li> </ul> <p>Many longer words are spelled with <strong>ai</strong>n at the end but are pronounced with a weak /u/ sound. Examples include: Brit<strong>ai</strong>n, fount<strong>ai</strong>n, and vill<strong>ai</strong>n. </p> <p>You can practise spelling <strong>ai </strong>words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=193">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=194">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>4) AY Words </strong></p> <p>At the end of a word, the long /a/ sound is spelled with the letters <strong>ay</strong>. </p> <p>Here are some examples of long /a/ words spelled with the letter <strong>ay</strong>: </p> <ul> <li> Sund<strong>ay</strong> </li> <li>pl<strong>ay</strong></li> <li>alw<strong>ay</strong>s</li> <li>betr<strong>ay</strong></li> <li>ess<strong>ay</strong></li> <li>displ<strong>ay</strong> </li> <li>del<strong>ay</strong></li> <li>fr<strong>ay</strong></li> </ul> <p>There are some exceptions to this rule, such as: grey, prey, they, obey, convey, and survey. You can practise spelling ay words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=195">here</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=196">here</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=197">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>5) EI Words </strong></p> <p>A few words spell the long /a/ sound with the letters <strong>ei</strong>. </p> <p>Here are some examples: </p> <ul> <li>r<strong>ei</strong>ns </li> <li>v<strong>ei</strong>l -</li> <li>w<strong>ei</strong>ght </li> <li>n<strong>ei</strong>gh </li> <li>v<strong>ei</strong>n -</li> <li>sh<strong>ei</strong>kh </li> <li>eight </li> <li>fr<strong>ei</strong>ght </li> </ul> <p>You can practise spelling <strong>ei </strong>words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=35">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>6) EA Words</strong></p> <p>In three words, the long /a/ sound is spelled with the letters <strong>ea</strong>: </p> <ul> <li>br<strong>ea</strong>k </li> <li>gr<strong>ea</strong>t </li> <li>st<strong>ea</strong>k </li> </ul> <p>These three words are also homophones of a – e words (br<strong>a</strong>k<strong>e</strong>, gr<strong>a</strong>t<strong>e</strong>, and st<strong>a</strong>k<strong>e</strong>). </p> <p>If you’d like to learn more about spelling long /a/ sounds, have a look at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit07/page1.cfm">Unit 7</a> on our online spelling course. <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/register.cfm">Subscribe to Spellzone</a> for extra tips and plenty of practice. </p> <p>Have a good week! </p> Mon, 21 Nov 2016 11:53:25 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Six%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FA%5FSound idioms, idioms about the theatre, theatre idioms, theatrical expressions, hard act to follow, break a leg, footloose, fancy free, out of step, showstopper, showbiz , show business, limelight Idioms and Expressions about the Theatre http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fand%5FExpressions%5Fabout%5Fthe%5FTheatre <ol> <li> <strong>a dog and pony show</strong> – an elaborate presentation or campaign <li><strong>a hard/tough act to follow</strong> – an achievement that sets a high standard that other success will struggle to compare to <li><strong>‘Break a leg!’</strong> – ‘Good luck!’ <li> <strong>class clown</strong> – a student who makes jokes and/or plays pranks <li><strong> footloose and fancy free</strong> – free from commitment <li><strong>number</strong> – a song/dance/performance <li><strong>out of step</strong> – not conforming to what others are thinking <li><strong>showstopper</strong> – a scene or song that receives a long applause from the audience/something that is very popular <li><strong>showbiz</strong> – show business <li><strong> star-studded </strong>– featuring many famous people <li><strong>the show must go on </strong>– an event or activity must continue despite hindrances/problems <li><strong>to be in the limelight </strong>– to be the focus of everyone’s attention <li><strong>to drag your feet/heels</strong> – to be reluctant to act <li><strong>to get into the groove</strong> – to begin to perform confidently <li><strong> to get the show on the road </strong>– to put a plan into action <li><strong>to have two left feet</strong> – to be clumsy/awkward <li><strong>to hold the stage </strong>– to dominate a scene/debate <li><strong>to keep your feet on the ground</strong> – to remain practical/sensible <li><strong> to make a clown of yourself</strong> – to embarrass yourself <li><strong>to make a song and dance out of something</strong> – to make a fuss <li><strong>to run the show</strong> – to take charge of an event or activity <li><strong>to set the scene</strong> – to describe a place or situation in which a story is set <li><strong> to sing a different tune</strong> – to change your opinion <li><strong>to steal the show</strong> – to receive the most attention/praise <li><strong>to step/tread on someone’s toes</strong> – to offend someone by intruding on their responsibilities <li><strong> to strut your stuff</strong> – to behave confidently and in a way that shows off your talents <li><strong> to think on your feet</strong> – to react to events effectively without any preparation <li><strong> to upstage someone</strong> – to divert attention away from someone else and onto yourself <li><strong>to wait in the wings </strong>– to be prepared to do something at the most appropriate/opportune moment <li><strong>twinkle toes</strong> – someone who is nimble/light on their feet/a good dancer </ol> <p>If you’ve found this post useful, why not check out our other articles on idioms?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li> <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> <p>Have a great week! </p> Tue, 15 Nov 2016 09:52:16 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fand%5FExpressions%5Fabout%5Fthe%5FTheatre learn spelling, long o sounds, spelling course, Spellzone, spelling tips, spelling practice, online spelling course, spelling resources Six Ways to Spell the Long O Sound http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Six%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FO%5FSound <p> A few weeks ago we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_Seven_Ways_of_Spelling_the_Long_E_Sound.htm">seven common ways of spelling the long /e/ sound</a>. Scroll down to read about six ways of spelling the long /o/ sound.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Just the Letter O </strong><br /> In some cases, the long /o/ sound is spelled with just the letter <strong>o</strong>. These are often but not always words that are more than one syllable long. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples of long /o/ words spelled with just the letter <strong>o</strong>: <ul> <li><strong>o</strong>val </li> <li>h<strong>o</strong>tel </li> <li>pr<strong>o</strong>gram </li> <li>t<strong>o</strong>tal</li> <li>y<strong>o</strong>ga</li> <li>n<strong>o</strong></li> <li>ag<strong>o</strong></li> <li>geck<strong>o</strong> <br /> <br /> </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong> O – E Words</strong> <br /> A very common way of spelling the long /o/ sound is with an <strong>o</strong> in the middle of the word and an <strong>e</strong> at the end of the word.<br /> <br /> Here are some examples of long /o/ words spelled with an <strong>o</strong> in the middle of the word and an <strong>e</strong> at the end: <ul> <li>r<strong>o</strong>se</li> <li>gl<strong>o</strong>be </li> <li>wh<strong>o</strong>le</li> <li>qu<strong>o</strong>te </li> <li>cons<strong>o</strong>ole</li> <li>horm<strong>o</strong>ne</li> <li>imp<strong>o</strong>se </li> <li>envel<strong>o</strong>pe </li> </ul> <p>You can practise spelling o – e words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=239">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=240">here</a>. </p> </li> <li> <strong>OA Words </strong><br /> A next most common way of spelling the long /o/ sound is with the letters <strong>oa</strong>. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples of the long/o/ sound spelled with the letters <strong>oa</strong>: <ul> <li>p<strong>oa</strong>ch </li> <li>bl<strong>oa</strong>t </li> <li>c<strong>oa</strong>l </li> <li>s<strong>oa</strong>p </li> <li>gr<strong>oa</strong>n </li> <li>encr<strong>oa</strong>ch </li> <li>t<strong>oa</strong>st </li> <li>cr<strong>oa</strong>k </li> </ul> <p>You can practise spelling oa words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=241">here</a>. </p> </li> <li> <strong>OW Words </strong><br /> Some words spell the long /e/ sound with the letters <strong>ow</strong>. In these words, the long /o/ sound usually appears at the end of the word. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples of long /o/ words spelled with letters <strong>ow</strong>: <ul> <li> r<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>sn<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>borr<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>elb<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>holl<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>mead<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>swall<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>wind<strong>ow</strong> </li> <li>tomorr<strong>ow</strong> </li> </ul> <p>You can practise spelling ow words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=242">here</a>. </p> </li> <li><strong>OE Words </strong><br /> Occasionally, at the end of a word, the long /o/ sound is spelled with the letters <strong>oe</strong>. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples of long /e/ words spelled with letters <strong>oe</strong>: </li> <ul> <li>t<strong>oe</strong></li> <li>f<strong>oe</strong></li> <li>d<strong>oe</strong></li> <li> r<strong>oe</strong> </li> <li>w<strong>oe</strong> </li> <li> ob<strong>oe</strong></li> <li> al<strong>oe</strong> <br /> <br /> </li> </ul> <li><strong>OUGH Words </strong><br /> The letters <strong>ough</strong> are used to spell many sounds including the long /o/ sound/. <br /> <br /> Here are some examples of long /o/ words spelled with letters <strong>ough</strong> <ul> <li>d<strong>ough</strong> </li> <li>th<strong>ough </strong></li> <li>alth<strong>ough</strong> </li> </ul> </li> </ol> <blockquote> <p>You can learn more about the <strong>ough</strong> words in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit17/quest1_p1-2/index.cfm">Unit 17</a> and practise spelling <strong>ough</strong> words <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=29">here</a>. </p> </blockquote> <p>If you’d like to learn more about spelling long /o/ sounds, have a look at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit07/page1.cfm">Unit 7</a> on our online spelling course. </p> <p><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/register.cfm">Subscribe to Spellzone</a> for extra tips and plenty of practice. </p> <p>Have a good week! </p> Tue, 08 Nov 2016 10:53:23 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Six%5FWays%5Fto%5FSpell%5Fthe%5FLong%5FO%5FSound