Spelling English spelling blog http://www.spellzone.com/ Information about all things regarding spelling, English language, English teaching, language help and learning and foreign languages English, spelling, language Spelling English spelling course http://www.spellzone.com/images/spellzone_name_on_small.jpg http://www.spellzone.com/ Improve your English writing, improve English writing, redundant expressions, tautology, English words, adjective, pay check, verb, adverb How to Improve Your Writing by Avoiding Redundant Expressions http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting%5Fby%5FAvoiding%5FRedundant%5FExpressions <p><strong>What is a redundant expression?</strong></p> <p>A redundant expression, or tautology, is an expression in which a word or group of words is unnecessary because it repeats something that has already been expressed by another word. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>This envelope <strong>contains</strong> important documents <strong>inside</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>While at first it might seem like there is nothing wrong with this sentence, if you take a closer look, you’ll notice that the word <strong>inside</strong> is redundant. This is because the word <strong>contains</strong> already indicates that the envelope holds documents within it. </p> <p><strong>Why is it important to be aware of redundant expressions when writing? </strong></p> <p>If your writing contains redundant expressions, a reader might think that you do not fully understand the meaning of the words you are using or that you are choosing them sloppily. While it might be tempting to use a longer or more unusual word because it might make you seem more knowledgeable about a subject, your writing will have quite the opposite effect if you don’t use the word correctly. </p> <p>We recommend always looking up a word in the dictionary if you are unsure of what it means and to remove it from your writing if it means the same thing as another word you have already used. Don’t forget, it is always better to use fewer words and make your point clearly than it is to use more and make it convolutedly. </p> <p><strong>What are some examples of redundant expressions? </strong></p> <p>One way of forming a redundant expression is by <strong>using two or more words with the same meaning</strong>. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>The <strong>reason</strong> for the flooding is <strong>because</strong> of the heavy rain.</li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>The words <strong>reason</strong> and <strong>because</strong> are doing the same work within the sentence, so only one is required. Better sentences would be: </p> <p>The <strong>reason</strong> for the flooding is the heavy rain. </p> <p>It flooded <strong>because</strong> of the heavy rain. </p> </blockquote> <p>Another type of redundant expression is using an adjective that repeats the meaning of the word it is describing. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>His pay check came with an <strong>added bonus</strong>. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>Since the word <strong>bonus</strong> means ‘something extra’, the word <strong>added</strong> is superfluous. A better sentence would be: </p> <p>His pay check came with a <strong>bonus</strong>. </p> </blockquote> <ul> <li> They came to a definite decision. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>The word <strong>decision</strong> refers to a plan that is finalised, so<strong> definite</strong> is not needed in this sentence. A better sentence is: </p> <p>They came to a <strong>decision</strong>. </p> </blockquote> <p>If the verb being described contains the same information that an adverb would add, leave it alone! </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>The managers decided to <strong>merge together</strong> two teams. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>The word <strong>merge</strong> indicates that two things are being brought <strong>together</strong>, making the adverb in this sentence unnecessary. A better sentence would be. </p> <p>The managers decided to <strong>merge</strong> two teams. </p> </blockquote> <ul> <li>The teacher decided to <strong>revert back</strong> to her old method. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p><strong>Revert</strong> describes the act of moving <strong>back</strong> to something. This means the adverb <strong>back</strong> is redundant. A better sentence would be: </p> </blockquote> <ul> <li>The teacher decided to <strong>revert </strong>to her old method. </li> </ul> <p>We’ll share more tips to help you improve your writing in future blog posts. Have a good week!</p> Thu, 16 Nov 2017 18:32:26 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting%5Fby%5FAvoiding%5FRedundant%5FExpressions confusing English words, everyday, every day, common English words, Spellzone, English dictionary, adjective, example English sentences, household chores, vacuuming, washing up, everyday jeans, everyday items, corner shop, vocabulary lists, improve Engli Commonly Confused Words: Everyday vs. Every Day http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FEveryday%5Fvs%2E%5FEvery%5FDay <p><strong>Should I use everyday or every day?</strong></p> <p>If you want to describe something that is ‘common’ or ‘ordinary’, use <strong>everyday</strong>. Click <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/Everyday">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is this adjective used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>He was responsible for the <strong>everyday</strong> household chores like vacuuming and washing up while she took care of the garden.</li> <li>Everyone else was dressed up and I stood out in my <strong>everyday</strong> jeans and jumper.</li> <li>You can buy <strong>everyday</strong> items like milk and bread at the corner shop.</li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=Everyday+&Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>everyday</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Every day</strong> means ‘daily’. </p> <p>Here is <strong>every day</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He did the vacuuming and washing up <strong>every day</strong>.</li> <li>It rained <strong>every day</strong> for a year.</li> <li>She made an effort to improve her spellings by practising on Spellzone <strong>every day</strong>. </li> </ul> <p><strong>When were the words every and day first joined together?</strong></p> <p><strong>Everyday </strong>has been used in English since the 1630s. It was originally used to describe clothing that was worn on ‘ordinary days’ rather than on Sundays or religious days. By 1763 the word was used more broadly as a synonym for ‘common’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between everyday and every day?</strong></p> <p>Some people find it helpful to think of <strong>every day</strong> as another way of saying <strong>each day</strong>. Let’s see what happens to our first group of example sentences if we replace the word <strong>every</strong> with the word <strong>each</strong>:</p> <ul> <li>He was responsible for the <strong>each</strong> day household chores like vacuuming and washing up while she took care of the garden.</li> <li>Everyone else was dressed up and I stood out in my <strong>each </strong>day jeans and jumper.</li> <li>You can buy <strong>each</strong> day items like milk and bread at the corner shop.</li> </ul> <p>Now let’s try it with our second group of example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He did the vacuuming and washing up <strong>each day</strong>.</li> <li>It rained <strong>each day</strong> for a year. </li> <li>She made an effort to improve her spellings by practising on Spellzone <strong>each day</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>While the second group of sentences make sense, the first group of sentences don’t mean anything. If the word <strong>each</strong> works in your sentence, use <strong>every day</strong>. If it doesn’t, use <strong>everyday</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Fri, 10 Nov 2017 08:09:41 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FEveryday%5Fvs%2E%5FEvery%5FDay Happy Halloween, idioms about death, idioms, All Hallow’s Eve, English language, dead as a dodo, dodo extinct, belly-up, dropping like flies, pushing up the daisies, six feet under, on last legs, kick the bucket, pop one’s, spooky, idioms for Halloween, Happy Halloween! Twenty Idioms about Death http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Happy%5FHalloween%21%5FTwenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FDeath <p>It’s said that on All Hallow’s Eve, for just one night, the spirits will rise and roam the earth again. If you’re scared – you’re not alone. The fear of death is so widespread in our culture that the English language is full of ways of referring to death that, in many cases, mean you don’t have to use the word itself. Here are twenty idioms about death: </p> <ol> <li><strong>as dead as a dodo</strong> – totally dead/extinct </li> <li><strong>as dead as a doornail</strong> – obviously dead </li> <li><strong>belly-up</strong> – dead </li> <li><strong>beyond the veil</strong> – in the unknown state of life after death </li> <li><strong>dropping like flies</strong> – dying in large numbers </li> <li><strong>food for worms/worm food</strong> – a dead (and buried) person </li> <li><strong>gone to glory</strong> – gone to death or destruction </li> <li><strong>pushing up the daisies</strong> – dead and buried </li> <li><strong>six feet under</strong> – dead and buried </li> <li><strong>sleeping with the fishes</strong> – dead </li> <li><strong>snuffed out</strong> – killed suddenly </li> <li><strong>someone’s number’s up/hour’s come</strong> – the time has come when someone is doomed to death, suffering, or disaster </li> <li><strong>to be on one’s last legs</strong> – to be approaching the end of one’s life </li> <li><strong>to come to/meet a sticky end</strong> – to die in an unpleasant way due to the consequences of ill-judged actions </li> <li><strong>to croak</strong> – to die </li> <li><strong>to have one foot in the grave</strong> – to be near death due to old age or illness </li> <li><strong>to kick the bucket</strong> – to die </li> <li><strong>to make the ultimate sacrifice</strong> – to give one’s life to a cause or to help someone else </li> <li><strong>to pop one’s clogs</strong> – to die </li> <li><strong>wiped out</strong> – extinct</li> </ol> <p><strong>Why not check out some of our other articles? </strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween%21.htm">Spooky Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Happy_Halloween-cc_Three_everyday_idioms_and_their_terrifying_origins">Three Everyday Idioms and their Terrifying Origins</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> <p>Happy Halloween!</p> Mon, 30 Oct 2017 14:32:05 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Happy%5FHalloween%21%5FTwenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FDeath Confusing English words:, conscience, conscious, Spellzone, dictionary definition, English word lists, example English sentences, guilty conscience, vocabulary lists, adjective, English language, Old French, Latin, Greek , The Online Etymology Dictionary Commonly Confused Words: Conscience vs. Conscious http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FConscience%5Fvs%2E%5FConscious <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>A <strong>conscience</strong> is one’s moral sense of right and wrong and is used to guide the way one chooses to conduct themselves. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/conscience">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>conscience</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>She wanted to skip her spelling lesson, but her <strong>conscience</strong> knew this was wrong. </li> <li>He couldn’t let go of his guilty <strong>conscience</strong> and eventually decided to own up to his crime. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/conscience">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>conscience</strong>.</p> <p>The adjective <strong>conscious</strong> describes the act of being aware of and responding to one’s surroundings. The word can also describe the act of knowing about something or doing something in a deliberate manner. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/conscious">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>conscious</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He didn’t seem to be <strong>conscious</strong>,so she checked his pulse. </li> <li>The head teacher was <strong>conscious</strong> of the bullying problem among the students and intervened. </li> <li>She made a <strong>conscious</strong> effort to improve her spellings by practising on Spellzone every day. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=conscious&amp;Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>conscious</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Conscience</strong> dates to the early thirteenth century and moved into English via Old French. The word derives from the Latin ‘<em>conscientia</em>’ which was probably a loan-translation of the Greek word ‘<em>syneidesis</em>’ meaning ‘<em>with-knowledge</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Conscious</strong> first started being used in English around 1600. It comes from the Latin ‘<em>conscius</em>’ meaning ‘<em>knowing, aware</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>Con<strong>science</strong> has the word <strong>science</strong> in it. Try putting both words into one sentence, for example: <em>She had a guilty con<strong>science</strong> about cheating on her <strong>science</strong> test</em>.</li> <li>Try saying the following to yourself to help you remember how to spell <strong>conscious</strong>: Always be consci<strong>ou</strong>s of your surr<strong>ou</strong>ndings. </li> <li>Try putting both words into the same sentence, for example: <em>It is important to be <strong>conscious</strong> of listening to your <strong>conscience</strong>.</em> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Thu, 26 Oct 2017 14:40:37 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FConscience%5Fvs%2E%5FConscious confusing English words, bated, baited, diminished, moderated, bated breath, Spellzone, dictionary definition, example English sentences, vocabulary lists, bait, Old Norse, Proto Germanic , The Online Etymology Dictionary Commonly Confused Words: Bated vs. Baited http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBated%5Fvs%2E%5FBaited <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>If something is <strong>bated</strong>, it means it is diminished or moderated. The word is rarely used outside of the expression ‘<em>bated breath</em>’. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/bated">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>bated</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>He waited with <strong>bated</strong> breath to see what she would say next. </li> <li>The audience watched with <strong>bated</strong> breath as the chase scene unfolded. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list including the word <strong>bated</strong>.</p> <p>If you <strong>bait</strong> something, it means you are lure, entice, or trap it. If you <strong>bait</strong> someone, it means you taunt or harass them. If something is <strong>bait</strong>, it means it is the thing being used to lure or entice.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/baited">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>baited</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The children loved <strong>baiting</strong> the teacher. </li> <li>I believe badger <strong>baiting</strong> was a cruel and unnecessary practice. </li> <li>She <strong>baited</strong> the fishing hook. </li> <li>We use worms as <strong>bait</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list including the word baited</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Bated</strong> dates back to around 1300. It first meant ‘<em>to alleviate, allay</em>’ and then later it also meant ‘<em>supress, do away with</em>’. By the late fourteenth century, it was used as shortened version of the word ‘<em>abate</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to reduce, cease</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Bait</strong>, meaning ‘<em>to torment or persecute</em>’, dates back to around 1200. Around 1400, the word started to be used to describe the act of putting food on a fishing line or in a trap and, by the seventeenth century, <strong>baited</strong> also meant ‘<em>furnished with bait</em>’. The word comes from the Old Norse ‘<em>beita</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to bite</em>’ which comes from the Proto Germanic ‘<em>baitjan</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>B<strong>ate</strong>d has the word <strong>ate</strong> in it. Breathing and eating are both actions that use the mouth. </li> <li> Ba<strong>it</strong>ed has the word <strong>it</strong> in it. Try and put both words in a sentence, such as: ‘She ba<strong>it</strong>ed <strong>it</strong>.’ </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 17 Oct 2017 16:09:27 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBated%5Fvs%2E%5FBaited past tense forms, past tense, English words, regular verbs, irregular verbs, spelling rules, spelt or spelled, spell, American English spellings, British English spelling, British or American spellings, English language, American English, English spelling Words with Sneaky Past Tense Forms http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5Fwith%5FSneaky%5FPast%5FTense%5FForms <p>When forming the past tense, words are split into regular and irregular verbs. In the case of regular verbs, the past tense is formed by adding ‘<em>ed</em>’ to the end of a verb (or just the letter ‘<em>d</em>’ if the verb ends in the letter ‘<em>e</em>’). Irregular verbs, on the other hand, do not follow the normal rules. This week, we’re taking a look at five words with confusing past tense forms.</p> <p><strong>Is it ‘spelt’ or ‘spelled’? </strong></p> <p>We couldn’t resist starting with this one! ‘Spell’ is one of a few verbs that has both a regular past tense form and an irregular one. The past tense and past participle of this word can be either ‘spelled’ or ‘spelt’. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>I <strong>spelled</strong> three words incorrectly in my test. </li> <li>I <strong>spelt</strong> three words incorrectly in my test. </li> <li>I had <strong>spelled</strong> three words incorrectly in my test.</li> <li>I had <strong>spelt</strong> three words incorrectly in my test. </li> </ul> <p>In American English, ‘spelled’ is the favoured past tense form and ‘spelt’ is considered incorrect, while in British in English ‘spelt’ is more popular (though ‘spelled’ is also acceptable’). Here at Spellzone, we tend to use the latter – hopefully we haven’t alienated our American students! Don’t forget that the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/british-american.cfm">Spellzone course covers both British and American spellings</a>. </p> <p>Other verbs with regular and irregular formations include burn – burned/burnt, smell – smelled/smelt, and dream – dreamed/dreamt. </p> <p><strong>Is it ‘sneaked’ or ‘snuck’? </strong></p> <p>When the verb ‘sneak’ first started cropping up in English in the sixteenth century its past tense and past participle form was ‘sneaked’. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>She <strong>sneaked</strong> past the guards. </li> <li>She had <strong>sneaked</strong> past the guards. </li> </ul> <p>Around three hundred years later, however, the irregular past tense form ‘snuck’ began appearing in American English. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> She <strong>snuck</strong> past the guards.</li> <li>She had <strong>snuck</strong> past the guards. </li> </ul> <p>Today there is much debate over whether or it is acceptable to use the past tense form ‘snuck’, with many people insisting that only ‘sneaked’ is correct. At Spellzone, we believe that English spelling rules should evolve depending on popular usage and that as long as you are consistent throughout a piece of writing, both past tense forms are fine to use. What is interesting, though, is that while most irregular verbs have fallen out of use in favour of their regular versions, the verb ‘sneak’ has gone the other way and, especially in America, ‘snuck’ is perhaps more widely used than ‘sneaked’.</p> <p>Usage of the verb ‘creep’, which has a similar meaning to ‘sneak’, is beginning to move in the opposite direction. The past tense and past participle form of this word is ‘crept’, but due to the common phrase ‘creep out’, the use of ‘creeped’ is becoming more widespread. </p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li>She <strong>crept</strong> past the guards. </li> <li>She had <strong>crept</strong> past the guards. </li> <li>The horror film <strong>creeped </strong>us out. </li> <li>The horror film had <strong>creeped </strong>them out. </li> </ul> <p>While ‘crept’ is the correct past tense form, it is acceptable to make exceptions in specific contexts such as with the above example. </p> <p><strong>Is it ‘shrunk’ or ‘shrank’? </strong></p> <p>Possibly due to the mistake in the title of the film <em>Honey, I Shrunk the Kids</em>, people often get confused when forming the past tense of the verb ‘shrink’. This irregular verb has different simple past tense and past participle forms.</p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> He accidentally <strong>shrank</strong> his jeans in the wash.</li> <li>He had accidentally <strong>shrunk</strong> his jeans in the wash. </li> </ul> <p>This means that the film should actually be called <em>Honey, I Shrank the Kids</em>, but doesn’t that sound odd? We so often hear the incorrect past tense form of this verb that when we hear the correct version it ‘sounds wrong’ because we are not expecting it.</p> <p>Have a good week!</p> Tue, 10 Oct 2017 09:35:59 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5Fwith%5FSneaky%5FPast%5FTense%5FForms hyphen, hyphens, compound words, prefix, word lists, prefixes, what is a prefix, prefix examples, vowel, hyphenated, hyphens in lists, punctuation, spelling, grammar Other Ways of Using Hyphens http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Other%5FWays%5Fof%5FUsing%5FHyphens <p>A hyphen is a short dash which is used to link words together. Last week, we learned how to use hyphens in compound words. Today, we will look at how to use hyphens when adding a prefix to another word, how to use hyphens to denote word breaks, and how to use hyphens to stand in for repeated parts of words in lists.</p> <p><strong>Using Hyphens to Join Prefixes to Other Words</strong></p> <p><strong>What is a prefix?</strong></p> <p>A prefix is a collection of letters that is added to the beginning of a word in order to modify its meaning. Prefixes are not usually words in their own right. </p> <p>Here are some examples of prefixes: </p> <ul><li>un- </li> <li>pre- </li> <li>multi- </li> <li>post- </li> <li>super- </li> </ul> <p><strong>Do I need to use a hyphen every time I add a prefix to a word? </strong></p> <p>As with many of the examples we shared in last week’s article on hyphens and compound words, the most important thing to remember is to focus on clarity. Does the word make sense without a hyphen? Will the addition of a hyphen make your meaning clearer? </p> <p>Some people prefer to use a hyphen when a prefix ends with a vowel and the other word also begins with one. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>pr<strong>e</strong>-<strong>e</strong>minent </li> <li>c<strong>o</strong>-<strong>o</strong>pt. </li> </ul> <p>It is acceptable to write these words without a hyphen and indeed this particular use of the hyphen has become less popular than it once was. Make sure you pick one style and use it consistently within a piece of writing. </p> <p>Hyphens are also used between a prefix and a name or a date. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>post-1980s technology </li> <li>pre-Shakespearean drama. </li> </ul> <p>Finally, hyphens are used to avoid mixing up similar words. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> re-cover (to cover something that has been covered before) vs. recover (to become healthy) </li> <li>co-op (a cooperative group) vs. coop (a pen where chickens are kept). </li> </ul> <p><strong>Using Hyphens to Divide Words </strong></p> <p>Sometimes you need to split a word that is not usually hyphenated. </p> <p>If, for example, a word does not fit neatly on a line of writing, you may choose to put part of the word on one line and part of it on the next. In this instance, a hyphen should be used to show where the word is split. When choosing where to split the word, it is important to avoid confusing your reader. Use syllable breaks to guide you. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>cup-board is much clearer than cupb-oard </li> <li> bed-room is much clearer than be-droom or bedr-oom </li> </ul> <p><strong>Using Hyphens in Lists </strong></p> <p>If the second part of all the words in a list is the same, a hyphen can be used to stand in for this part of the word in all the words except the last one. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>two-, three-, or fourfold </li> <li>uni-, bi-, and tricycles </li> </ul> <p>If you are interested in learning more about punctuation, you can find some of our other articles <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grammar_and_Punctuation_Tips.htm">here</a>. </p> <p>Have a good week!</p> Wed, 04 Oct 2017 10:37:55 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Other%5FWays%5Fof%5FUsing%5FHyphens compound words, what is a hyphen? , hyphen, prefix, compound adjectives, noun, adjective, participle, compound verb, verbs, phrasal verbs, adverb, preposition, prepositions, compound noun, nouns, spelling, grammar Hyphens in Compound Words http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FHyphens%5Fin%5FCompound%5FWords <p><strong>What is a hyphen?</strong></p> <p> A <strong>hyphen</strong> is a short dash which is used to link words together. There are three main situations in which hyphens are used: in compound words, when adding a prefix to another word, and to denote word breaks. This week, we will look at how to use hyphens in compound words. </p> <p><strong>What is a compound word? </strong></p> <p>A <strong>compound word </strong>is a word that is made up of two or more other words. Hyphens are often used in compound words either to show that when the included words are together they have a combined meaning, or to show the relationship between the included words. There are different types of compound words and you don’t need to use hyphens in all of them. </p> <p><strong>Compound Adjectives </strong></p> <p>Hyphens are most commonly used in <strong>compound adjectives</strong>. These are words made up of a noun and an adjective, a noun and a participle, or an adjective and a participle. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">here</a> to learn more about nouns and adjectives. </p> <p>Here are some examples of compound adjectives: </p> <ul> <li>good-looking </li> <li>custom-built </li> <li> sugar-free </li> <li>bad-tempered </li> </ul> <p>In these examples, you can that the hyphen helps makes the meaning of the words clear. It shows us that we need to read both words together and look for their combined meaning. </p> <p>If compound adjectives are made from either a phrase or using the adverb ‘well’, a hyphen is needed only if the adjective comes before the noun. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> He was a well-liked member of the class. </li> <li> The boy was well liked. </li> <li> She participated in on-the-job training. </li> <li> It was her first day of training on the job.</li> </ul> <p>Hyphens are especially important when the compound adjective includes numbers. Without the hyphen, the meaning might get confused. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>ten-metre long ropes (this clearly describes ropes that are ten metres long). </li> <li> ten metre long ropes (it is unclear whether this is describing many ropes that are ten metres long or ten ropes that are each one metre long). </li> </ul> <p><strong>Compound Verbs</strong></p> <p>The term <strong>compound verb</strong> describes two nouns joined together to make a verb. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">here</a> to learn more about verbs.</p> <p>Here are some examples of compound verbs: </p> <ul> <li> <strong>giftwrap</strong> becomes <strong>to gift-wrap</strong></li> <li><strong> ice skate</strong> becomes <strong>to ice-skate </strong></li> <li> <strong>cold shoulder</strong> becomes <strong>to cold-shoulder </strong></li> <li><strong>spot check</strong> becomes <strong>to spot-check </strong></li> </ul> <p>Make sure you don’t confuse <strong>compound verbs</strong> with <strong>phrasal verbs</strong>. A phrasal verb is made up of a verb and an adverb or a verb and a preposition and does not require a hyphen. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> to give up </li> <li>to break out </li> <li> to drop off</li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">here</a> to learn more about adverbs and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_2.htm">here</a> to learn more about prepositions. </p> <p>However – and here’s where it becomes complicated – if a phrasal verb is turned into a noun, a hyphen is necessary.</p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> The coach made several other <strong>drop-offs</strong> before taking us to London.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Compound Nouns</strong></p> <p>A <strong>compound noun</strong> is a word made up of two separate nouns. While compound nouns do not require hyphens, some people prefer to use them. It is also acceptable (and preferred by most writers) to write compound nouns either as two separate words or joined up to make one word. The most important thing is to choose one style of writing a compound noun and to use this style consistently throughout a piece of work. Don’t, for example, interchange between <strong>fire-arm</strong>, <strong>firearm</strong>, and <strong>fire arm</strong>. </p> Sun, 01 Oct 2017 13:53:55 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FHyphens%5Fin%5FCompound%5FWords apostrophe errors, apostrophes, punctuation marks, tips for using apostrophes, apostrophe to form a plural, plurals, abbreviations, possessive pronoun, contraction, possessive forms, Waterstones, Nando’s, Tom and Jerry, spelling and grammar Apostrophe Errors http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Apostrophe%5FErrors <p>The apostrophe is perhaps one of the most-often misused punctuation marks. In one of our previous blog posts, we shared <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">ten tips for using apostrophes correctly</a>. This week, we are going to take a look at some of the most common mistakes people make while using apostrophes so that you can avoid making them too.</p> <p><strong>Never use an apostrophe to form a plural </strong></p> <p>One place where people often add unnecessary apostrophes is in plurals. You <em>never</em> need an apostrophe to form a plural. This includes the plurals for abbreviations, letters, numbers, spans of years, and surnames. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>cars</strong> not <em>car’s </em></li> <li><strong> ifs and buts</strong> not <em>if’s and but’s </em></li> <li><strong>DVDs</strong> not <em>DVD’s</em> </li> <li><strong>Ps and Qs</strong> not <em>P’s and Q’s</em> </li> <li><strong>9s </strong>not <em>9’s </em></li> <li><strong>the 1970s</strong> not <em>the 1970’s</em></li> <li><strong>the Smiths</strong> not <em>the Smith’s </em></li> </ul> <p>To learn more about how to form plurals correctly, click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Forming_Plurals.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>Never use an apostrophe in a possessive pronoun </strong></p> <p>As apostrophes are used to denote if someone or something possesses someone or something else, it is easy to get confused when it comes to possessive pronouns. A pronoun should <em>never</em> use an apostrophe to indicate possession. </p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li><strong>theirs</strong> not <em>their’s</em></li> <li><strong>yours</strong> not <em>your’s </em></li> </ul> <p>However, an apostrophe is necessary if you are using a pronoun as part of contraction. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>he’s </strong>not <em>hes</em> (he is) </li> <li><strong> they’re</strong> not <em>theyre </em>(they are) </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">here</a> to learn more about contractions and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Pronouns.htm">here</a> to learn more about pronouns. </p> <p><strong>Be careful with the following possessive forms </strong></p> <p>When multiple people or things are in possession, only the last name that is listed requires an apostrophe. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Mum and Dad’s house</strong> not <em>Mum’s and Dad’s house </em></li> <li><strong>Tom and Jerry’s ongoing rivalry</strong> not <em>Tom’s and Jerry’s ongoing rivalry </em></li> </ul> <p>If a surname ends in the letter S, the apostrophe should come <em>after</em> the S. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong> the Smiths’ house</strong> not the Smith’s house </li> </ul> <p>Some organisations choose to drop apostrophes from their brand name even though using one is grammatically correct. When writing brand names, you should follow the organisation’s lead. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Waterstones</strong> not <em>Waterstone’s </em></li> <li><strong>Nando’s</strong> not <em>Nandos</em></li> </ul> <p> If you are interested in learning more about punctuation, you can find some of our other articles <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grammar_and_Punctuation_Tips.htm">here</a>. </p> <p>What aspects of spelling and grammar do you struggle with the most? Let us know if there are any other topics you would like us to cover! </p> Fri, 22 Sep 2017 13:35:43 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Apostrophe%5FErrors English spelling, spelling using senses, learn to spell, practise spelling, how to remember spellings, learn spelling, learning words, correct spelling, look, say, cover, write, check, mnemonic, syllables, pronouncing words Spelling Using the Senses http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spelling%5FUsing%5Fthe%5FSenses <p>Here at Spellzone, we encourage our students to learn spelling using as many senses as they can. By learning in this way, we are able to connect as many associations as possible with the spelling of a particular word. These associations should help trigger our memories when we are trying to remember spellings.</p> <p>So how we can be aware of the five senses when learn spelling? </p> <p><strong>SIGHT</strong> </p> <p>When learning a word, <strong>LOOK</strong> closely at it. Then cover it up and try to remember how the letters are positioned on the page. Picture your own handwriting and the way the letters look beside each other. </p> <p>Sometimes if you spell a word in a few different ways, one of the spellings will <strong>LOOK</strong> more familiar than the others. It can be useful to have scrap of paper to hand to do this on – often it is possible to tell which word ‘just looks right’. For example toylet vs. toilet or tois vs. toys. </p> <p>It is also possible that the words you are looking for may be close to hand, perhaps on a worksheet or in a dictionary, on a billboard or on a book cover. If you can recognise the shape of words, you will be able to use these aids to help you find the correct spelling. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Tests_to_Make_Sure_Your_Spelling_is_in_Top_Shape_for_Exam_Time.htm">here</a> to learn more about the <em><strong>Look</strong>, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em> method of testing.</p> <p>You can also utilise how a word <strong>LOOKS</strong> on the page to create a mnemonic – find out more <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>SOUND </strong></p> <p>When you use the <em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em> method, it is also useful to pay attention to the <strong>SOUND</strong> of a word. Break down each syllable as you say a word – this might give you a clue about how to spell it. </p> <p>The <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/index.cfm">Spellzone dictionary</a> also allows you to listen to how a word is pronounced. Search for the word you are looking for and click on the speaker icon to hear it. Pay attention to how the <strong>SOUND</strong> of the word is similar or different to the spelling. </p> <p>If you are focussing on the sounds of words, you might find it useful to use rhymes to create mnemonics. Find out more <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>TOUCH </strong></p> <p>Muscle memory can play an important part in learning spelling. When practicing the word, both writing it and typing it out can be helpful. <strong>FEEL</strong> how the pen moves on the page, or where the letters are on the keyboard. After a while your hands will train themselves to automatically create the shapes of certain words. </p> <p>You may also find it useful to notice how your mouth and tongue moves when pronouncing particular words. Associating these movements with spelling patterns may help trigger your memory. </p> <p><strong>SMELL AND TASTE </strong></p> <p>While, for most people, these two senses won’t be of much use when it comes to learning spellings, there are some who might find that certain smells and tastes trigger certain memories. Others might reward themselves with a sweet treat after each word they spell correctly… any opportunity for chocolate is surely good for learning, right? </p> <p>Have a great week!</p> </body> Mon, 18 Sep 2017 11:38:49 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spelling%5FUsing%5Fthe%5FSenses elicit meaning, illicit meaning, emotions, opinions, Spellzone, dictionary definition, example sentences, huge media interest, vocabulary lists, adjective, morality, law, convention, example English sentences, Latin, English, Old French spelling tricks Commonly Confused Words: Elicit vs. Illicit http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FElicit%5Fvs%2E%5FIllicit <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> The word <strong>elicit </strong>means ‘<em>to call forth</em>’ or ‘<em>to draw out</em>’. It is used to describe the calling forth of emotions, opinions, responses etc. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/elicit">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>elicit</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>The museum <strong>elicited</strong> huge media interest. </li> <li>She tried to <strong>elicit</strong> a smile from her crying friend. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list including the word <strong>elicit</strong>.</p> <p>The adjective <strong>illicit</strong> is used to describe activity which is done in spite of accepted morality, law, or convention.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/illicit">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>illicit</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The area was known for the presence of <strong>illicit</strong> activities. </li> <li>The company was fined for <strong>illicit</strong> conduct. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=illicit&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>illicit</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Elicit </strong>dates back to the 1640s and comes from the Latin ‘<em>elicitus</em>’ which means ‘<em>draw out, draw forth</em>’. The word is made up of <em>‘ex-</em>’ meaning ‘<em>out</em>’ and ‘<em>-licere</em>’, a form of ‘<em>lacere</em>’, meaning ‘<em>to entice, lure, deceive</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Illicit </strong>dates back to around 1500 and comes from the Old French ‘<em>illicite</em>’ meaning ‘<em>unlawful, forbidden</em>’, which in turn comes from the Latin ‘<em>illicitus</em>’ meaning ‘<em>not allowed, unlawful, illegal</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>The word <strong>illicit</strong> refers to <strong>illegal</strong> activities. Both words begin with the letters <strong>ill</strong>. </li> <li>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘He <strong>el</strong>icited advice from <strong>El</strong>eanor.’ </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 04 Sep 2017 14:22:38 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FElicit%5Fvs%2E%5FIllicit punctuation, commas, clauses, semi colons, synonyms, suffixes, root word, abbreviations, apostrophe, full stop, contractions, grammar mistakes, plurals, nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, determiners, pronouns, prepositions Grammar and Punctuation Tips http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Grammar%5Fand%5FPunctuation%5FTips <p>The summer holidays are coming to an end and if you’re not back at school yet, you will be soon. To help you prepare, we’ve compiled a list of our favourite posts on grammar and punctuation.</p> <ol> <li>Commas are confusing, but luckily we’re here to help. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commas_and_Clauses.htm">here</a> to learn how to use commas to separate clauses, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">here</a> to learn how to use commas as part of a list, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Use%5FCommas%5Fin%5FDirect%5FSpeech">here</a> to learn how to use commas in direct speech. </li> <li>If you think commas are difficult to use, you’ll probably think semi colons are worse. This punctuation mark is used to denote a break that has more emphasis than a comma but is less final than a full stop. In <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm">this article</a>, we look at the two common circumstances in which it is appropriate to use a semicolon. </li> <li>We’ve already looked at how to use commas in direct speech, but what about the other rules for correctly formatting dialogue? Should you single or double speech marks? What punctuation marks should you use? Find out <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Formatting_Speech.htm">here</a>. You can also practise spelling synonyms for the words ‘said’ <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=3615">here</a>. </li> <li>All sentences have a subject and many also have an object. Knowing which of the two you're dealing with can help you with other aspects of writing. Find out more <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">here</a>. </li> <li> A suffix is added to the end of a word to change its meaning. Sometimes, when you add a suffix, the root word has to be changed slightly first. Find five tips for adding suffixes <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Adding_Suffixes.htm">here</a>. </li> <li>Capitals letters can be more complicated that you might think. While you can sometimes get away without using capital letters in informal writing (like emails or text messages), it is important to learn how to use them correctly for formal writing (like essays and business correspondence). Learn how to use them <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">here</a>. </li> <li>Shortening words can be a tricky business. Should you capitalise an abbreviation? Does it need an apostrophe? What about full stop after it? In <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Forming_Abbreviations.htm">this article</a> we share top tips for forming abbreviations. A contraction is a particular type of abbreviation and in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">this article</a> we look further at common contractions and how to format them correctly. </li> <li> One use of the apostrophe is to denote missing letters in contractions. Find out about the other ways to use this confusing punctuation mark <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">here</a>. </li> <li>One of the most common grammar mistakes people make is using an apostrophe when forming a plural. Make sure you don’t fall into this trap and learn how to form plurals correctly <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Forming_Plurals.htm">here</a>. </li> <li> The term ‘word class’ is used to describe the way a particular word functions in a sentence and there are nine main word classes. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">here</a> to learn about nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs; <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_2.htm">here</a> to learn about conjunctions, determiners, exclamations, pronouns, and prepositions; and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Pronouns.htm">here</a> to learn about the different types of pronouns. </li> </ol> <p>Are there any grammar-related topics that you would like us to cover? Let us know! </p> Wed, 30 Aug 2017 10:32:28 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Grammar%5Fand%5FPunctuation%5FTips English words said wrong, English words mispronounced, English language, English spelling, spelling, pronunciation, hard to pronounce English words, British spelling, American spelling, Yorkshire company, British English, American English, phonetic recor Words People Often Say Wrong http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5FPeople%5FOften%5FSay%5FWrong <p>A few years ago, we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/20_Often-Mispronounced_Words.htm">20 words that are often mispronounced</a>.</p> <p>One of the reasons English is such a difficult language to learn is because you can neither rely on the pronunciation of a word to work out its spelling, nor can you rely on the spelling to work out the pronunciation. This is because English has evolved from a variety of different languages. Take a look at the following ‘<em>ch</em>’ words: cheese, champagne, chaos. While they’re all spelt with the same first two letters, the start of each word is pronounced differently: ‘<em>ch</em>’, ‘<em>sh</em>’, and ‘<em>k</em>’. </p> <p>This week we are going to look at 20 more hard-to-pronounce words, but it’s important to emphasise that pronunciations vary from region to region and from country to country. Take the word ‘<em>route</em>’ for example – here in Britain, we pronounce it ‘<strong>root</strong>’, but in America it is pronounced ‘<strong>rowt</strong>’. As a Yorkshire-based company, we certainly don’t believe that there is only one correct way to pronounce each word! </p> <p>Here are 20 words that can be difficult to say: </p> <ol> <li><strong>Asterisk </strong><br /> It’s easy to forget the ‘s’ in this word. Make sure you say <strong>aster-risk</strong> not <em>aster-rik</em>. </li> <li><strong>Cache</strong> <br /> Pronounce this word <strong>cash</strong> not <em>catch</em>. </li> <li><strong>Cavalry</strong> <br /> People often mix up where the ‘l’ falls in this word. Say <strong>caval-ree</strong> not <em>cal-very</em>. </li> <li><strong>Chaos</strong> <br /> This word is pronounced with a hard ‘c’ sound: <strong>kay-oss</strong> not <em>chay-oss</em> or <em>shay-oss</em>.</li> <li><strong>Chest of Drawers </strong><br /> Many people blur the words ‘chest’ and ‘of’ when talking about this piece of furniture. Make sure to separate them and say <strong>chest of drawers</strong> and not <em>chester drawers</em>. </li> <li><strong> February</strong> <br /> This word is traditionally pronounced <strong>Feb-ru-air-ee</strong>, but the pronunciation <strong>Feb-you-air-ee</strong> is also correct. </li> <li><strong>Heinous </strong><br /> This word is pronounced <strong>hay-nus</strong>. </li> <li><strong> Miniature </strong><br /> In British English, the ‘a’ in ‘miniature’ isn’t pronounced, but in American English it is. Pronounce this word either <strong>mini-chur </strong>or <strong>minia-chur</strong>. </li> <li> <strong>Moot </strong><br /> This word is pronounced like it is spelt. Say <strong>moot</strong> not <em>mute</em>.</li> <li><strong>Niche </strong><br /> Pronounce this word <strong>neesh</strong> not <em>nitch</em>. </li> <li><strong>Nuclear </strong><br /> Many people incorrectly pronounce this word <em>nuke-yuh-luhr</em>. Make sure you say <strong>new-klee-uhr</strong>. </li> <li><strong>Picture </strong><br /> Don’t forget to pronounce the ‘c’ in this word. Say <strong>pic-chur</strong> not <em>pitcher</em>. </li> <li><strong> Prescription </strong><br /> It’s easy to mix up the ‘r’ and the ‘e’ when saying this word. Say <strong>pruh-scrip-shun</strong> not <em>per-scrip-shun</em>. </li> <li><strong>Probably </strong><br /> People often miss out the second ‘b’ in ‘probably’. This word is pronounced <strong>prob-ab-lee</strong> not <em>prob-lee</em>. </li> <li><strong>Prostate </strong><br /> A second ‘r’ gets added to this word when people mix it up with the similar word ‘prostrate’. Say <strong>pros-tate</strong> not <em>pros-trate</em>. </li> <li> <strong>Quinoa </strong><br /> This word is pronounced <strong>keen-wah</strong>. </li> <li><strong>Sherbet </strong><br /> Don’t let a second ‘r’ sneak its way into this word. Say <strong>sher-but</strong> not <em>sher-burt</em>. </li> <li><strong>Suite </strong><br /> The ‘ui’ in this word is very confusing! ‘Suite’ is pronounced <strong>sweet</strong> not <em>soo-t</em>. </li> <li><strong>Utmost </strong><br /> Pay particular attention to the first two letters in this word. Say <strong>ut-most</strong> not <em>up-most</em>. </li> <li><strong>Wednesday </strong><br /> Despite what its spelling might suggest, this word is pronounced with two syllables. Say <strong>Whens-day</strong> not <em>Wenners-day</em> or <em>Wed-ners-day</em>. </li> </ol> <p>Did you know that our dictionary includes phonetic recordings of each word? Type in the word you’re interested in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/index.cfm">here</a> to hear how it is pronounced. </p> <p>Have a great week! </p> Mon, 21 Aug 2017 10:14:14 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5FPeople%5FOften%5FSay%5FWrong English idioms, idiom, friendship idioms, friendship, a shoulder to cry on, birds of a feather, close-knit, peas in a pod, thick as thieves, joined at the hip, build bridges, bury the hatchet, like a house on fire, bedfellows, speak the same language Twenty Idioms about Friendship http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FFriendship <ol> <li><strong>a shoulder to cry on</strong> – someone who listens sympathetically </li> <li><strong> birds of a feather flock together</strong> – people who have the same outlook/tastes/interests will be found in each other's company </li> <li><strong>close-knit</strong> – very close </li> <li><strong> like two peas in a pod</strong> – very similar </li> <li><strong>through thick and thin</strong> – through all circumstances no matter how difficult</li> <li><strong> to be as thick as thieves</strong> – to be very close or friendly </li> <li> <strong>to be joined at the hip</strong> – to be inseparable </li> <li> <strong>to be on the same page/wavelength</strong> – to be in agreement </li> <li><strong>to build bridges</strong> – to promote friendly relations between people or groups </li> <li><strong> to bury the hatchet</strong> – to end a conflict </li> <li><strong>to clear the air</strong> – to defuse the tension </li> <li><strong>to get on famously </strong>– to get on very well with someone </li> <li> <strong>to get on like a house on fire</strong> – to get on very well with someone</li> <li><strong> to get on swimmingly</strong> – to get on very well with someone </li> <li><strong> to hit it off</strong> – to find yourself immediately and naturally friendly with someone </li> <li><strong> to know someone inside out</strong> – to know someone very well </li> <li><strong>to make strange bedfellows</strong> – to make unlikely companions </li> <li><strong> to move in the same circles</strong> – to socialise with the same people all of whom have a similar background or lifestyle </li> <li><strong>to see eye to eye with someone</strong> – to agree with someone</li> <li><strong> to speak the same language</strong> – to understand someone as a result your shared values or opinions </div></ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Tue, 15 Aug 2017 12:22:10 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FFriendship confusing words, English words, flair and flare, flair, flare, English dictionary, example sentences, vocabulary lists, word lists, flair for music, flared his nostrils, flared trousers, emergency flare, Old French, American English, Scandinavian, Dutch Commonly Confused Words: Flair vs. Flare http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFlair%5Fvs%2E%5FFlare <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> If you have <strong>flair</strong>, it means you have natural talent for something or a distinctive and stylish elegance. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/flair">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>flair</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li> It was only the pupil’s first piano lesson, but the teacher could already tell he had a <strong>flair</strong> for music. </li> <li>Her clothes have such <strong>flair</strong>, don’t you think? </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=flair&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>flair</strong>. </p> <p>If a something <strong>flares</strong>, it spreads outwards. The word is often used to describe sudden bursts or light, fire, or emotion. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/flare">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>flare</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>He <strong>flared</strong> his nostrils in exasperation. </li> <li>Over the ocean, they saw a red <strong>flare</strong> shoot into the night’s sky. </li> <li>The fashion was to wear <strong>flared</strong> trousers. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=flare&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word flare. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p>In the mid-fourteenth century, the word <strong>flair</strong> used to mean ‘<em>odour</em>’. It came from the Old French ‘<em>flaire</em>’ meaning ‘<em>fragrance, sense of smell</em>’, which in turn came from the Latin ‘<em>fragrare</em>’ meaning ‘<em>emit (a sweet) odour</em>’. The word’s modern meaning is American English and dates back to 1925. This meaning probably derives from hunting and a dog’s skill for tracking an animal’s scent. </p> <p>The origin of <strong>flare</strong> is uncertain, but the word dates back to the 1540s and perhaps comes from Scandinavian or Dutch. The meaning ‘to shine out with sudden light’ is from the 1630s, the meaning ‘<em>giving off of a bright, unsteady light</em>’ from 1814, the meaning ‘<em>signal fire</em>’ from 1883, and the meaning ‘<em>flared trousers</em>’ from 1964. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>Fl<strong>air</strong> has the word <strong>air</strong> in it. </li> <li>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘He had a real fl<strong>air</strong> for h<strong>air</strong>dressing.’ </li> <li>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘Take c<strong>are</strong> when you light that fl<strong>are</strong>.’ </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 07 Aug 2017 09:57:15 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFlair%5Fvs%2E%5FFlare spelling practice, spelling practise, improve spelling, spelling games, spelling worksheets, spelling ability test, spelling course, phonic spelling, spelling rules, spelling patterns, curriculum word lists, KS3 spelling lists, vocabulary word lists Guide to Spellzone Word Lists http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FGuide%5Fto%5FSpellzone%5FWord%5FLists <p> For Spellzone users, word lists are a vital part of learning how to spell.</p> <p>While most of our students are looking to improve their spelling, it is important to remember that not everyone will find the same words difficult to learn. Students studying different subjects at school may also have different sets of vocabulary that they are required to be familiar with – it is unlikely that someone studying Biology will need to know the same terms as someone studying Drama. Our word list feature is a great way to adapt Spellzone to your specific needs by creating lists featuring the words you personally struggle with. <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Using_Spellzone_Word_Lists_as_Part_of_Your_Exam_Preparation.htm">Click here to learn how</a>. </p> <p>We also have a huge collection of existing word lists in a wide array of subjects. You can find these under the ‘<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/index.cfm">Word Lists</a>’ tab on the top right of any page of our site. There you will also find a list of Spellzone’s most popular word lists at any given moment on the left hand side of the page, and a word cloud of the words students are learning at any given moment at the bottom of a page. When you have clicked through to a list, choose on the ‘eye’ icon at the top of each list to learn using the ‘<em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em>’ activity; the ‘ear’ icon to take a ‘<em>Listen and Spell</em>’ test; and the ‘football’ icon to play games using your words. Click the ‘paper’ icon to print a word list as worksheets for off-line study. </p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/course_lists.cfm">Course Word Lists<br /> </a></strong>The spelling course is central to Spellzone. After taking our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Spelling_Ability_Test.htm">Spelling Ability Test</a>, students are given a personally tailored pathway through the spelling course to work on. The <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/what-is-spellzone.cfm">Starter Course</a> teaches all the basic phonic spelling rules using multi-sensory activities. The 36 units of the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/what-is-spellzone.cfm">Main Course</a> explore all the spelling rules, breaking them down into basic building blocks that test and track progress along the way. You can work through a unit as many times as you want, or you can head to our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/course_lists.cfm">course word lists</a> to practise words that follow a specific spelling rule or pattern. </p> <p>Spellzone also creates ‘My Difficult Words’ bespoke lists for each student as they work through the course units. These are made from the words that the student spell incorrectly so they can learn them using the <em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check </em>activity, <em>Listen and Spell</em> test and the Spellzone games. </p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists-curriculum.cfm">Curriculum Word Lists<br /> </a></strong>While these word lists follow the English school curriculum, we are sure our students from around the world will find them useful too. This collection includes <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists-curriculum.cfm">curriculum guides and is targeted at students in Key Stages 1-3</a>. Lists in this collection also focus on high frequency words and subject-specific vocabulary. Learn more about the Key Stage 3 spelling lists <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Key_Stage_3_Spelling_Lists.htm">here</a>. </p> <p>If you are a teacher anywhere in the world and would like us to add word lists that are specific to your curriculum please <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/contact.cfm">get in touch</a>. </p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/vocabulary_lists.cfm">Vocabulary Word Lists<br /> </a></strong>In these lists, words are grouped by subject. While these lists are suitable for all Spellzone users, they will be particularly useful for students who are learning English. You can find out more about how to make the most of Spellzone as a second-language English speaker here. Use our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/vocabulary_lists.cfm">vocabulary word lists</a> to test yourself on a variety of words grouped in subjects ranging from animals to musical instruments to the Zodiac signs. </p> <p>You can bookmark lists <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/bookmarked-lists.cfm">here</a>, check out the word lists created by schools <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_by_school.cfm">here</a>, and keep track of the word lists you have created <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_my.cfm">here</a>. </p> <p>Have a good week! </p> Mon, 31 Jul 2017 11:38:53 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=%5FGuide%5Fto%5FSpellzone%5FWord%5FLists English idioms, idiom, cat idioms, cat and mouse, scaredy cat, cat burglar, catnap, copycat, curiosity killed the cat, cat on a hot tin roof, herding cats, raining cats and dogs, cat among the pigeons Idioms about Cats http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FCats <body> <ol> <li><strong> a cat may look at a king</strong> – someone of low status still has rights <li><strong> a fraidy/scaredy-cat</strong> – a timid/fearful person <li><strong> all cats are grey in the dark</strong> – if the qualities distinguishing people can’t be perceived, they don’t matter <li><strong>cat burglar</strong> – an agile, stealthy, and unnoticed burglar who climbs up walls and through windows to enter buildings <li><strong>cat call</strong> - a shrill shout or whistle expressing either sexual admiration but in a predatory and victimising manner or disapproval <li><strong>cat got your tongue?</strong> – a question posed to someone who remains silent when expected to speak <li><strong>catnap</strong> – a short sleep during the day <li><strong>copycat </strong>– someone who copies another’s behaviour/clothes/ideas/work <li><strong>curiosity killed the cat</strong> – being nosy might get you into trouble <li><strong>like a cat on a hot tin roof</strong> – agitated/anxious <li><strong>like a scalded cat </strong>– very quickly <li><strong>like herding cats</strong> – difficult/impossible <li><strong> not enough room to swing a cat</strong> – very confined <li><strong> raining cats and dogs</strong> – raining heavily <li><strong> the cat’s whiskers/pyjamas</strong> – an excellent person or thing, of the highest quality <li><strong> there is more than one way to skin a cat </strong>– there are multiple ways to achieve your aim <li><strong>to fight like cats and dogs </strong>– to constantly fight <li><strong>to let the cat out of the bag</strong> – to expose a secret <li><strong>to look like something the cat dragged in</strong> – to look dirty or scruffy <li><strong> to look like the cat that swallowed the canary/stole the cream</strong> – to look very pleased/satisfied with oneself <li><strong>to not have a cat in hell’s chance</strong> – to have no chance <li><strong> to play cat and mouse with (someone)</strong> – to use cunning manoeuvres to trick/thwart someone <li><strong> to see which way the cat jumps</strong> – to see what direction something is taking before committing yourself <li><strong>to set a cat among the pigeons</strong> – to cause controversy <li><strong>when the cat's away, the mice will play</strong> – people will always take advantage of the absence of authority to do what they want to </ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, why not check out our other articles?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> </body> Mon, 24 Jul 2017 09:56:24 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FCats Avani Shah, The Guardian, Estate BAME Short Story Prize, Danuta Kean, Writing the Future, Creative Writing, University of East Anglia, Grunwick Strike, Word Factory, Audible Avani Shah, Spellzone writer - audio book - BAME Short Story Prize 2017 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Avani%5FShah%2C%5FSpellzone%5Fwriter%5F%2D%5Faudio%5Fbook%5F%2D%5FBAME%5FShort%5FStory%5FPrize%5F2017 <p>We are delighted that Avani’s short story which has been shortlisted for the ‘The Guardian 4th Estate BAME Short Story Prize 2017’ is now available as a free audio book from Audible. </p> <p>Some wonderful stories well worth a listen – Avani’s story ‘Greed’ is Chapter 4.</p> <p>If you are viewing on a laptop go <a href="http://www.audible.co.uk/pd/Fiction/FREE-New-Voices-The-Guardian-4th-Estate-BAME-Short-Story-Prize-2017-Audiobook/B073VTF5PH?qid=1499935461&sr=1-3">here.</a></p> <p>If you are viewing on a mobile device go <a href="https://mobile.audible.co.uk/pd/Fiction/FREE-New-Voices-The-Guardian-4th-Estate-BAME-Short-Story-Prize-2017-Audiobook/B073VTF5PH?qid=1499935461&sr=1-3">here</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Spellzone_Writer_Shortlisted_for_Prestigious_Prize.htm">See previous blog for more information</a>.</p> Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:32:05 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Avani%5FShah%2C%5FSpellzone%5Fwriter%5F%2D%5Faudio%5Fbook%5F%2D%5FBAME%5FShort%5FStory%5FPrize%5F2017 confusing words, English words, hear and here, perceiving a sound, ear, Spellzone, English dictionary, example sentences, vocabulary lists, word lists, Old English, heran, Proto-Germanic Commonly Confused Words: Hear vs. Here http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHear%5Fvs%2E%5FHere <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> If you <strong>hear</strong> something, it means you are perceiving a sound with your ear.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/hear">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>hear</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>She <strong>heard</strong> the rumble of the approaching train. </li> <li>Did you <strong>hear</strong> what happened at the party? </li> <li>She didn’t want to <strong>hear</strong> what they were saying about her. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=hear&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>hear</strong>. </p> <p>The word <strong>here</strong> is used by a speaker or writer to refer to the place or position they are currently in. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/here">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>here</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>We’ve been meeting <strong>here</strong> at the community centre for years. </li> <li>I can’t wait to get out of <strong>here</strong>. </li> <li>On this page, we have used hyperlinks on the word <strong>here</strong> to direct students to other parts of the Spellzone website. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=here&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word here. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Hear</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>heran</em>’ which means ‘<em>to hear, perceive by the ear, listen (to), obey, follow; accede to, grant; judge</em>’. ‘<em>Heran</em>’ comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘<em>hauzjan</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Here</strong> has been used in English since around 1600. It comes from the Old English ‘<em>her</em>’ meaning ‘<em>in this place, where one puts himself; at this time, toward this place</em>’. The phrase ‘<em><strong>here</strong> and now</em>’ dates back to 1829. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>H<strong>ear</strong> has the word <strong>ear</strong> in it. Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘You <strong>hear</strong> with your <strong>ear</strong>.’ </li> <li> <strong>Here</strong> is the opposite of the word <strong>there</strong>. T<strong>here</strong> contains the word <strong>here</strong>. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Thu, 20 Jul 2017 14:05:06 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHear%5Fvs%2E%5FHere abbreviation, e.g. , English sentences, example sentences, CV, cover letter, application form, spelling mistakes, improve your spelling, spelling tests, spelling games, spelling lessons, i.e., information in a sentence, improve spelling, Latin phrases Commonly Confused Words: e.g. vs. i.e. http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5Fe%2Eg%2E%5Fvs%2E%5Fi%2Ee%2E <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p> The abbreviation <strong>e.g.</strong> is used in a sentence to indicate that you are about to provide an example. <p>Here is <strong>e.g.</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>When applying for a job, make sure you check everything your potential employer will see (<strong>e.g.</strong> your CV, cover letter, application form, etc.) for spelling mistakes. </li> <li>Spellzone has a variety of features that will help you improve your spelling, <strong>e.g.</strong> spelling tests, spelling games, and spelling lessons.</li> </ul> <p>You should never use <strong>e.g.</strong> at the start of a sentence.</p> <p>The abbreviation <strong>i.e.</strong> is used to clarify the information provided in a sentence.</p> <p>Here is <strong>i.e.</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>When applying for a job, make sure everything your potential employer will see is spelt correctly, <strong>i.e.</strong> you should check your CV and any other documents for spelling mistakes before sending them in </li> <li>Spellzone is used by a variety of users all whom have one thing in common, <strong>i.e.</strong> they all want to improve their spelling. </li> </ul> <p>You should never use <strong>i.e.</strong> at the start of a sentence.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p>The word <strong>e.g.</strong> has been used in English since the 1680s. It is an abbreviation of the Latin phrase ‘<em>exempli gratia</em>’ which means ‘for the sake of example’.</p> <p>The word <strong>i.e.</strong> is short for the Latin ‘<em>id est</em>’ which literally translates to ‘<em>that is (to say)</em>’. Rather than providing an example of something, <strong>i.e.</strong> is used to introduce another way of saying the same thing in order to clarify meaning.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>Use the <strong>e</strong> in <strong>e.g.</strong> to help you remember that this is another way of saying ‘for <strong>e</strong>xample’. </li> <li>Use the <strong>i</strong> in <strong>i.e.</strong> to help you remember that this is another way of saying ‘<strong>i</strong>n essence’ or ‘<strong>i</strong>n other words’. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flaunt_vs._Flout.htm">Flaunt vs. Flout</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Wed, 12 Jul 2017 09:43:40 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5Fe%2Eg%2E%5Fvs%2E%5Fi%2Ee%2E