Spelling English spelling blog http://www.spellzone.com/ Information about all things regarding spelling, English language, English teaching, language help and learning and foreign languages English, spelling, language Spelling English spelling course http://www.spellzone.com/images/spellzone_name_on_small.jpg http://www.spellzone.com/ confusing english words, hoard, horde, valuables, money, verb, saving for the future, Spellzone, English dictionary, example english sentences, word lists, nomadic, nomads, study word list, Old English, West Turkic, Polish, French, Spanish Commonly Confused Words: Hoard vs. Horde http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHoard%5Fvs%2E%5FHorde <p><strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p>A <strong>hoard</strong> is a secret store of valuables or money. As a verb, the word refers to the act of gathering or saving supplies for future use. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/hoard">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>hoard</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>While cleaning out his late mother’s house, he found a <strong>hoard</strong> of old coins. </li> <li> Some animals <strong>hoard</strong> food for the winter. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=hoard&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone study lists related to the word <strong>hoard</strong>. </p> <p>The word <strong>horde</strong> refers to a large group of moving people like a crowd or a nomadic community. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/horde">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>horde</strong> used in an example sentence: </p> <ul> <li>She pushed through the <strong>hordes</strong> as she raced to reach the bus stop on time. </li> <li>At the end of the match, <strong>hordes</strong> of fans rushed onto the pitch. </li> </ul> <p>Click here to create a Spellzone study list including the word <strong>horde</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Hoard</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>hotd</em>’ meaning ‘<em>a treasure, valuable stock or store</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Horde</strong> dates back to the 1550s and was borrowed into English from West Turkic via Polish, French, or Spanish. The word described a ‘<em>tribe of Asiatic nomads living in tents</em>’. <strong>Horde</strong> has been used as a verb since the 1820s. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between hoard and horde? </strong></p> <p>H<strong>orde</strong> and <strong>orde</strong>r have four of the same letters in them. Come up with a sentence using both words to help you remember what <strong>horde</strong> means. For example: She pushed through the h<strong>orde</strong> in <strong>orde</strong>r to find her friend. </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Father_vs._Farther_vs._Further.htm">Father vs. Farther vs. Further</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_By_vs._Bye_vs._Buy.htm">By vs. Bye vs. Buy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hair_vs._Hare.htm">Hair vs. Hare</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">Heir vs. Air</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Wed, 08 Aug 2018 18:28:01 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHoard%5Fvs%2E%5FHorde writing in English, practise your spelling, creative writing, English spelling, automatic writing, writing ideas, junk mail, English newspapers, improving English writing, planning English writing Five Writing Prompts http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FWriting%5FPrompts <p>A few weeks ago we shared <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Ideas_to_Keep_You_Writing_Over_the_Summer_Holidays.htm">Five Ideas to Keep You Writing Over the Summer Holidays</a>. Writing is an excellent way to practise your spelling, but what do you do when inspiration doesn’t strike? Here are five ideas to help you get those creative juices flowing: <ol> <li><strong>Automatic writing </strong><br /> A method the writers across the world swear by, this exercise is bound to help you generate ideas. Set your timer for five minutes and start writing – don’t let your pen (or fingers if you’re typing) stop moving until your alarm goes off. Write whatever comes into your head, even if it doesn’t make sense. If you’d prefer, you can change the period of time you’re writing for to ten minutes, twenty minutes, or even longer. While at first it might seem like what you’re writing is nonsense, you’ll be surprised by quickly your brain will jump into action. When you read over what you’ve written, who knows what ideas will emerge? <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Let the alphabet guide your story </strong><br /> In your margin, write one letter of the alphabet on each line and write down the first word that comes into your head beginning with each letter. Once you’ve got your twenty-six words try and fit them into a piece of writing. You could challenge yourself to describe a setting or try and fit in all the words into a conversation between two characters. While you probably won’t end up keeping everything you write in this exercise, trying to fit in some of the weirder words will certainly lead some original and unexpected prose. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Pick up a book </strong><br /> Pick up the nearest book, open it on a random page, and write down the first sentence your eyes fall on. This is now your first line – see where it takes you. If you don’t have a book to hand, this method also works with anything with writing: junk mail, newspapers, online articles. Use whatever you have at hand to prompt you. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Rewrite a memory </strong><br /> What’s your earliest memory? Write it out focussing on the five senses. What about your happiest or saddest memory? Try writing it from the point of view of someone else who was there. If you would rather not use your own memories, choose your favourite character and explore something that might have happened to them before the story they appear in. Or write one of your favourite scenes from the point of view of a peripheral character. You’ll soon be buzzing with ideas! <br /> <br /> </li> <li> <strong>Fill in the blanks </strong><br /> Try building on one of these scenarios: <br /> <br /> <ul> <li>You wake up somewhere you don’t recognise with no recollection of how you got there. What do you see? Can you hear anything? Are there any clues you can use to help you work out what happened? <br /> <br /> </li> <li>You arrive at your parents’ or friends’ house and something seems slightly off. Maybe you hear them fighting about something? Maybe something isn’t where it usually is. What happens next? <br /> <br /> </li> <li>A stranger tells you their life story. What do you learn? </ol> </li> </ul> </li> </ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, you might like our other articles on writing:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_to_Help_You_Improve_Your_Writing.htm">Tips for Improving Your Writing </a><br /> <br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Planning_Your_Writing.htm">Tips for Planning Your Writing</a> </li> </ul> Thu, 02 Aug 2018 08:40:00 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FWriting%5FPrompts Mars, space idioms, planet Mars, Earth, Mars water, the sun, opposition, planet, night sky, everything under the sun, Houston, Apollo 13, rocket science, moonshine, space cadet, spaced out, starry eyed, life on Mars Are you from Mars? and Other Idioms About Space http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Are%5Fyou%5Ffrom%5FMars%2Dqq%5Fand%5FOther%5FIdioms%5FAbout%5FSpace <p>At the end of this month, we will have the closest view of the planet Mars since 2003. When Earth and Mars line up directly with the sun, it is called an opposition and this year this takes place on July 27. From this date until July 30, Mars will appear at its brightest since 2003. The planet will be visible for most of the night, hitting its highest point around midnight. Mars will reach its closest approach to Earth on July 31 and then become fainter by the middle of August. <p>Here are 25 idioms about space: <ol> <li><strong>are you from Mars?</strong> – a question used to indicate that someone is out of touch with reality/the norm</li> <li> <strong>everything under the sun</strong> – everything on earth </li> <li><strong>failure to launch</strong> – struggling to transition into adulthood</li> <li><strong>Houston, we have a problem!</strong> – a reference to the Apollo 13 mission, used humorously to report something that has gone wrong </li> <li><strong> it’s not rocket science/you don’t need to be a rocket scientist</strong> – it’s not that difficult to understand/you don’t need to be extremely intelligent </li> <li><strong>many moons (ago)</strong> – a long time (ago) </li> <li><strong>moonshine</strong> – illicitly/illegally distilled alcohol, foolish ideas </li> <li><strong>on another planet</strong> – out of touch with reality/the norm </li> <li><strong>once in a blue moon</strong><strong> </strong>– rarely </li> <li><strong>out of this world</strong> – very impressive/enjoyable </li> <li><strong>over the moon</strong> – delighted, extremely happy </li> <li><strong>rising star</strong> – someone who is achieving increasing success in a particular field and likely to rise to the top</li> <li><strong>space cadet </strong>– someone who is out of touch with reality/spaced out on drugs </li> <li><strong>star-crossed</strong><strong> </strong>– inevitable, thwarted by bad luck, doomed by the stars </li> <li><strong>to aim/reach/shoot for the stars</strong> – to aim high, to have ambitions </li> <li><strong>to ask for the moon/to give someone the moon</strong> – to ask for the impossible/to promise someone the impossible </li> <li><strong>to come back down to earth</strong> – to return to reality after a period of excitement/daydreaming </li> <li><strong>to have stars in your eyes/starry-eyed</strong> – to be naively or idealistically enthusiastic about something or someone </li> <li><strong>to hitch your wagon to a star</strong> – to try and achieve by associating yourself with someone who is already successful </li> <li><strong>to moon around </strong>– to move around/spend time aimlessly usually due to sadness or being in love </li> <li><strong>to see stars</strong> – to think you are seeing flashes of light after hitting your head </li> <li><strong>to thank your lucky stars</strong> – to feel grateful for your good fortune </li> <li><strong>to think someone hung the moon and stars</strong> – to think someone is extraordinary </li> <li><strong>what planet are you on?</strong> – a question used to indicate that someone is out of touch with reality/the norm </li> <li><strong>written in the stars</strong> – predetermined by fate/destiny </li> </ol> <p>Can you think of any idioms about space? </a> </li> </ul> </p> Thu, 26 Jul 2018 16:03:06 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Are%5Fyou%5Ffrom%5FMars%2Dqq%5Fand%5FOther%5FIdioms%5FAbout%5FSpace english writing, improve your spelling, texting, social media posts, emojis, english sentences, creative writing, blogging, pen pal, English spelling forums, english film reviews, tips to improving english writing, english spelling Five Ideas to Keep You Writing Over the Summer Holidays http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FIdeas%5Fto%5FKeep%5FYou%5FWriting%5FOver%5Fthe%5FSummer%5FHolidays <p>One of the best ways to improve your spelling is by making writing a part of your daily routine, but while you’re not at school, university, or work, chances are you won’t have as many opportunities to practise. Whether you’re going away for just a few days or you have the whole summer off, here are five ideas to make sure you keep writing: <ol> <li><strong>Look out for opportunities to practise in your established routine </strong><br /> <br /> From texting, to commenting on social media posts, to writing shopping lists, it’s possible that your day is already filled with writing that you don’t even realise you’re doing. Pay attention to these moments and commit to using full words (instead of abbreviations and emojis!) and sentences as much you can.<br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Every person has a book in them – what’s yours? </strong><br /> <br /> Why not get started on the story you’ve always wanted to write? If fiction isn’t for you, perhaps you might like to try your hand at poetry or screenplays. Now’s the time to put your life story or family history into words. Creative writing is one of the most fun and rewarding ways to get that practice in! <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Keep a diary </strong><br /> <br /> During a holiday is the perfect time to try keeping a diary – you’ll probably have more to document than usual. <br /> <br /> You might want to keep a traditional diary in a private notebook, or you might want to branch out into blogging or scrapbooking instead. As for what to include – the possibilities are endless! As well as a record of your thoughts and actions, you could document anything from books you’ve read, to your exercise routines, to your favourite recipes. <a href="https://www.pinterest.co.uk/giasphere/journal-writing-prompts/?autologin=true">Pinterest</a> is a great place to find journaling and scrapbooking ideas. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Find yourself a pen pal! </strong><br /> <br /> Letters and emails are a great way to connect with friends and family while practising your writing at the same time. This type of communication allows you to really think about what you want to say – why not team up with someone who wants to improve their writing too? Your correspondence could include challenges such as writing about a specific subject or trying to fit in every word from a pre-arranged list. <br /> <br /> If you would prefer to write to someone you don’t know, many charities pair people up with vulnerable members of the community who are looking for someone to correspond with. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Use writing to expand or share your knowledge of an existing hobby </strong><br /> <br /> Your writing practice doesn’t have to be separate from your existing hobbies – in fact, it’s the type of skill that fits alongside almost any activity. Online forums and groups are a great place to build on the skills you already have and to chat with others who share your interests. Alternatively, if you’d like to share your knowledge with other people, why not try writing a blog? You could share recipes, film reviews, DIY instructions – the sky’s the limit!</li> </ol> <p>If you enjoyed this post, you might like our other articles on writing:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_to_Help_You_Improve_Your_Writing.htm">Tips for Improving Your Writing </a><br /> <br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Planning_Your_Writing.htm">Tips for Planning Your Writing</a> </li> </ul> Mon, 23 Jul 2018 09:54:37 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FIdeas%5Fto%5FKeep%5FYou%5FWriting%5FOver%5Fthe%5FSummer%5FHolidays using commas, commas confusing, english sentences, word lists, punctuation marks, formatting direct speech, reported speech, separate clauses, English words, commas, clauses, parenthesis, dispensable word, brackets, dashes, English punctuation, semi colon Five Tips for Using Commas http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Ffor%5FUsing%5FCommas <p>Do you find commas confusing? Don’t worry – you’re not alone. Commas have a variety of functions yet many people are uncertain of how to use them. The main purpose of a comma is to clarify meaning by grouping together specific parts of the sentence. Each group within the sentence is separated by a comma which marks a slight break. <p> Let’s look at five instances when you need to use a comma in more detail: <ol> <li><strong>Use commas as part of a list </strong><br /> <br /> When you’re writing a list, the most common way to differentiate between each item by using a comma between them. <br /> <br /> For example: <br /> <br /> <ul> <li>My favourite foods are jacket potatoes, quiche, spaghetti and fish and chips. </li> </ul> <p>Learn more about how to use commas (and other punctuation marks) to make your lists as clear as possible <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">here</a>. <br /> </p> </li> <li><strong>Use commas when formatting direct speech </strong><br /> <br /> In writing, there are two types of speech: direct speech and reported speech. The term direct speech refers to when the actual words of a speaker are quoted in the text, while the term reported speech refers to when the gist of someone’s word are described. <br /> <br /> Commas are used to help make clear when speech begins and ends and to help structure other details such as who is talking or how the words are said. You can learn more about how to format direct speech <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Formatting_Speech.htm">here</a> and about how commas are used in direct speech <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Use_Commas_in_Direct_Speech.htm">here</a>. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Use commas to separate clauses </strong><br /> <br /> A clause is a group of words containing a verb that can either stand alone as a complete sentence or make up part of a more complex sentence. Complex sentences are usually split into main clauses and subordinate clauses using commas. Learn more about commas and clauses <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commas_and_Clauses.htm">here</a>. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Use commas to offset a parenthesis </strong><br /> <br /> A parenthesis is a dispensable word or phrase inserted into a sentence as an explanation or afterthought. Commas (as well as brackets and dashes) are used to mark these asides. <br /> <br /> For example: <br /> <br /> <ul> <li>Her parents, of course, were thrilled with the news of her promotion. </li> <li>Her parents, Sally and James, were thrilled with the news of her promotion. </li> </ul> <p>If you are unsure about your commas, try replacing them with brackets and checking to see if the sentence still makes sense. <br /> </p> </li> <li><strong>Use a comma with the word ‘however’ </strong><br /> <br /> When you use the word ‘however’ to show a contrast or alternative opinion, use a comma after it. <br /> <br /> For example: <br /> </li> </ol> <ol> <ul> <li>England is famous for its horrible weather. However, this summer has been very hot. </li> <li>Her parents were proud of her promotion, however, it didn’t stop them worrying about her finances. </li> </ul> </ol> <blockquote> <p>If you are using ‘however’ to mean ‘whatever way’, a comma is not necessary:</p> </blockquote> <ol> <ul> <li>However you look at it, you can’t deny that the team worked hard.</li> <li>However hard you try to please everyone, someone will always be disappointed. <br /> </li> </ul> </ol> <p> If you found this article useful, you may be interested in our other posts about punctuation:</p> <ul> <li> <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm">How to Use a Semi Colon</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">When to Use Capital Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shoulda,_Coulda,_Woulda-cc_Using_Apostrophes_to_Indicate_Missing_Letters">How to Use Apostrophes to Indicate Missing Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">Ten Tips for Using Apostrophes</a> </li> </ul> Wed, 18 Jul 2018 10:07:55 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Ffor%5FUsing%5FCommas American English, British English, american english spelling differences, 4th July, Independence Day, American Independence Day, american spelling, english spelling, Spellzone, American Language American English vs British English: Six Key Spelling Differences http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=American%5FEnglish%5Fvs%5FBritish%5FEnglish%3A%5FSix%5FKey%5FSpelling%5FDifferences <p>July 4th marks Independence Day in America. You can read more about why this day is celebrated <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/An_Independent_American_Language.htm">here</a>.</p> <p>The internet means choosing whether to use American spelling or English spelling no longer just depends on what country you live in. More and more people work with colleagues from all over the world and different institutes, organisations, and publications have different style guides. This means it is likely that you will have to change between American and British spelling every now and then. </p> <p>While there are some one-offs that are best to learn as you go along (read more about these in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit36/page1.cfm">Unit 36</a> of Spellzone), here are six general spelling rules to help you learn the key differences between American and British spelling: </p> <p>Words that end in <em><strong>our</strong></em> in British English end in <em><strong>or</strong></em> in American English </p> <table width="276" border="1"> <tr> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>British English</strong></td> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>American English </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">arm<strong>our</strong><br /> behavi<strong>our</strong> <br /> cand<strong>our</strong> <br /> clam<strong>our</strong> <br /> col<strong>our</strong><br /> demean<strong>our</strong> <br /> endeav<strong>our</strong> <br /> fav<strong>our</strong><br /> fav<strong>our</strong>ite <br /> flav<strong>our</strong> <br /> glam<strong>our</strong> <br /> harb<strong>our</strong> <br /> hon<strong>our</strong> <br /> hum<strong>our</strong> <br /> lab<strong>our</strong> <br /> neighb<strong>our</strong> <br /> od<strong>our</strong> <br /> ranc<strong>our</strong> <br /> rig<strong>our</strong> <br /> rum<strong>our</strong> <br /> savi<strong>our</strong> <br /> sav<strong>our</strong> <br /> sav<strong>our</strong>y <br /> splend<strong>our</strong> <br /> val<strong>our</strong> <br /> vap<strong>our</strong> <br /> vig<strong>our</strong></td> <td valign="top">arm<strong>or</strong> <br /> behavi<strong>or</strong> <br /> cand<strong>or</strong> <br /> clam<strong>or</strong> <br /> col<strong>or</strong> <br /> demean<strong>or</strong> <br /> endeav<strong>or</strong> <br /> fav<strong>or</strong> <br /> fav<strong>or</strong>ite <br /> flav<strong>or </strong><br /> glam<strong>or</strong><br /> harb<strong>or</strong> <br /> hon<strong>or</strong> <br /> hum<strong>or</strong> <br /> lab<strong>or</strong> <br /> neighb<strong>or</strong> <br /> od<strong>or</strong> <br /> ranc<strong>or</strong> <br /> rig<strong>or</strong> <br /> rum<strong>or</strong> <br /> savi<strong>or</strong> <br /> sav<strong>or</strong> <br /> sav<strong>or</strong>y <br /> splend<strong>or</strong> <br /> val<strong>or</strong> <br /> vap<strong>or</strong> <br /> vig<strong>or</strong></td> </tr> </table> <p>Words that end in <em><strong>re</strong></em> in British English end in <em><strong>er</strong></em> in American </p> <table width="276" border="1"> <tr> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>British English</strong></td> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>American English </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">calib<strong>re</strong> <br /> cent<strong>re</strong> <br /> fib<strong>re</strong> <br /> lit<strong>re</strong> <br /> lust<strong>re</strong> <br /> manoeuv<strong>re</strong> <br /> meag<strong>re</strong> <br /> met<strong>re</strong> <br /> sab<strong>re</strong> <br /> scept<strong>re</strong> <br /> somb<strong>re</strong> <br /> spect<strong>re</strong> <br /> theat<strong>re</strong></td> <td valign="top">calib<strong>er</strong> <br /> cent<strong>er</strong> <br /> fib<strong>er</strong> <br /> lit<strong>er</strong> <br /> lust<strong>er</strong> <br /> maneuv<strong>er</strong> <br /> meag<strong>er</strong> <br /> met<strong>er</strong> <br /> sab<strong>er</strong> <br /> scept<strong>er</strong> <br /> somb<strong>er</strong> <br /> spect<strong>er</strong> <br /> theat<strong>er</strong> <p>Exceptions include: ac<strong>re<br /> </strong>massac<strong>re</strong><br /> medioc<strong>re</strong><br /> og<strong>re</strong></p> </td> </tr> </table> <p>Words that end in <em><strong>ogue</strong></em> in British English end in <em><strong>og</strong></em> in American English</p> <table width="276" border="1"> <tr> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>British English</strong></td> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>American English </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">anal<strong>ogue </strong><br /> dial<strong>ogue </strong> <br /> catal<strong>ogue </strong> <br /> epil<strong>ogue </strong> <br /> monol<strong>ogue </strong> <br /> prol<strong>ogue </strong> <br /> travel<strong>ogue</strong></td> <td valign="top">anal<strong>og </strong><br /> dial<strong>og</strong> <br /> catal<strong>og</strong> <br /> epil<strong>og</strong> <br /> monol<strong>og</strong> <br /> prol<strong>og</strong> <br /> travel<strong>og</strong> <p>Note: <em><strong>ogue</strong></em> endings are also used in American English </p></td> </tr> </table> <p>For words that end in <em><strong>l</strong></em> in British English, do not double the <em><strong>l</strong></em> when adding a suffix in American English</p> <table width="276" border="1"> <tr> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>British English</strong></td> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>American English </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">cance<strong>ll</strong>ed <br /> counse<strong>ll</strong>or <br /> equa<strong>ll</strong>ed <br /> fue<strong>ll</strong>ing <br /> fue<strong>ll</strong>ed <br /> grove<strong>ll</strong>ing <br /> jewe<strong>ll</strong>er <br /> jewe<strong>ll</strong>ery <br /> leve<strong>ll</strong>ed <br /> libe<strong>ll</strong>ed <br /> marve<strong>ll</strong>ous <br /> mode<strong>ll</strong>ing <br /> pane<strong>ll</strong>ed <br /> quarre<strong>ll</strong>ing <br /> reve<strong>ll</strong>ed <br /> woo<strong>ll</strong>en</td> <td valign="top">cance<strong>l</strong>ed <br /> counse<strong>l</strong>or <br /> equa<strong>l</strong>ed <br /> fue<strong>l</strong>ing <br /> fue<strong>l</strong>ed <br /> grove<strong>l</strong>ing <br /> jewe<strong>l</strong>er <br /> jewe<strong>l</strong>ery <br /> leve<strong>l</strong>ed <br /> libe<strong>l</strong>ed <br /> marve<strong>l</strong>ous <br /> mode<strong>l</strong>ing <br /> pane<strong>l</strong>ed <br /> quarre<strong>l</strong>ing <br /> reve<strong>l</strong>ed <br /> woo<strong>l</strong>en </td> </tr> </table> <p> Words with <em><strong>ae</strong></em> or <em><strong>oe</strong></em> in British English require just an <em><strong>e</strong></em> in American English </p> <table width="276" border="1"><tr><td width="130" valign="top"><table width="276" border="1"> <tr> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>British English</strong></td> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>American English </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">diarrh<strong>oe</strong>a <br /> <strong>oe</strong>strogen <br /> f<strong>oe</strong>tus <br /> man<strong>oe</strong>uvre <br /> an<strong>ae</strong>mia <br /> c<strong>ae</strong>sarean<br /> gyn<strong>ae</strong>cology<br /> h<strong>ae</strong>morrhage <br /> leuk<strong>ae</strong>mia <br /> pal<strong>ae</strong>ontology <br /> p<strong>ae</strong>diatric </p></td> <td valign="top">diarrh<strong>e</strong>a <br /> <strong>e</strong>strogen <br /> f<strong>e</strong>tus <br /> man<strong>e</strong>uver <br /> an<strong>e</strong>mia <br /> c<strong>e</strong>sarean <br /> gyn<strong>e</strong>cology<br /> h<strong>e</strong>morrhage <br /> leuk<strong>e</strong>mia <br /> pal<strong>e</strong>ontology <br /> p<strong>e</strong>diatric</td> </tr> </table> <strong></strong></td> </tr> </table> <p>Words that end with <strong>ise</strong> in British English end with <strong>ize</strong> in American English </p> <table width="276" border="1"> <tr> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>British English</strong></td> <td width="130" valign="top"><strong>American English </strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top">author<strong>ise</strong> <br /> capital<strong>ise</strong><br /> character<strong>ise</strong> <br /> civil<strong>ise</strong> <br /> colon<strong>ise</strong> <br /> critic<strong>ise</strong> <br /> emphas<strong>ise</strong><br /> equal<strong>ise</strong> <br /> mobil<strong>ise</strong> <br /> natural<strong>ise</strong><br /> organ<strong>ise</strong> <br /> popular<strong>ise</strong> <br /> real<strong>ise</strong><br /> recogn<strong>ise</strong> <br /> satir<strong>ise</strong> <br /> standard<strong>ise</strong><br /> symbol<strong>ise</strong> <br /> vapor<strong>ise</strong></td> <td valign="top">author<strong>ize </strong><br /> capital<strong>ize </strong><br /> character<strong>ize </strong> <br /> civil<strong>ize </strong> <br /> colon<strong>ize</strong> <br /> critic<strong>ize</strong> <br /> emphas<strong>ize</strong> <br /> equal<strong>ize</strong> <br /> mobil<strong>ize </strong><br /> natural<strong>ize</strong> <br /> organ<strong>ize</strong> <br /> popular<strong>ize</strong> <br /> real<strong>ize</strong> <br /> recogn<strong>ize</strong> <br /> satir<strong>ize</strong> <br /> standard<strong>ize</strong><br /> symbol<strong>ize</strong> <br /> vapor<strong>ize</strong></td> </tr> </table> <p>Those of you who frequently read our blog will certainly not be surprised to hear that these rules have many exceptions. Read more about them <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/unit36/page1.cfm">here</a>. </p> <p>You can also find our other posts on American English here: </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/An_Independent_American_Language.htm">An Independent American Language</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Four_American_words_and_their_British_translations.htm">Four American words and their British translations</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Borrowing_from_the_Americas.htm">Borrowing from the Americas</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/American_Idioms.htm">American Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_American_English_Words_and_their_British_English_Counterparts.htm">Sixty American English Words and their British English Counterparts</a> </li> </ul> <p>We hope you have a festive day!</p> Tue, 03 Jul 2018 16:30:33 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=American%5FEnglish%5Fvs%5FBritish%5FEnglish%3A%5FSix%5FKey%5FSpelling%5FDifferences summer idioms, summer solstice, longest day of the year, solstice, English, Latin, sol, sun, sister, stand still, spring, beginning of summer, warm weather, a place in the sun, come rain or shine, everything under the sun, indian summer, ray of sunshine, Twenty Idioms for the Start of Summer http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Ffor%5Fthe%5FStart%5Fof%5FSummer <p>Last week marked summer solstice – the longest day of the year. The word '<em>solstice</em>' has been used in English since the mid-13th century. It comes from the Latin ‘<em>sol</em>’ meaning ‘<em>sun</em>’ and ‘<em>sistere</em>’ meaning ‘<em>stand still</em>’.</p> <p>To celebrate the end of spring and the beginning of summer, here are twenty idioms about the warm weather seasons:</p> <ol> <li><strong>a place in the sun</strong> – a position of advantage </li> <li><strong>a touch of the sun</strong> – slight sunstroke </li> <li><strong>come rain or shine</strong> – whatever the weather/situation </li> <li><strong>everything under the sun</strong> – everything on earth </li> <li><strong>happy is the bride the sun shines on</strong> – old proverb saying that if the sun shines on your wedding day, you will have good luck </li> <li><strong>high season</strong> – the most popular time to visit an attraction or resort, the time of year when the prices are the most expensive</li> <li><strong> Indian Summer</strong> – a period of unexpected hot and dry weather, often in the Autumn months </li> <li><strong>knight in shining armour</strong> – an idealised and chivalrous hero who rescues someone from a difficult situation </li> <li><strong>midsummer madness</strong> – foolish/reckless behaviour which seems to escalate at the height of summer </li> <li><strong>on which the sun never sets</strong> – worldwide </li> <li><strong> one swallow doesn't make a summer</strong> – one good/lucky event should not always be seen as an indication that what follows will be good as well </li> <li><strong>one’s day in the sun</strong> – the time when someone achieves the highest possible level of success </li> <li><strong>ray of sunshine</strong> – a person who brings happiness into the lives of others (often used sarcastically to refer to someone with a gloomy outlook on life) </li> <li><strong>spring cleaning </strong>– thorough house cleaning </li> <li><strong>spring chicken </strong>– a young person </li> <li><strong>spring forward, fall back</strong> – a mnemonic to help you remember that the clocks move an hour forward in the spring and an hour back in the autumn </li> <li><strong>sun-drenched </strong>– getting a lot of sunshine </li> <li><strong>to brighten up</strong> – to become more cheerful </li> <li><strong>to make hay when the sun shines </strong>– to make the most of an opportunity while it lasts </li> <li><strong>to take a shine to</strong> – to develop a liking for <br /> </li> </ol> <p>If you liked this post, check out our other articles on idioms:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Insects.htm">Twenty Idioms about Insects</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Royalty_for_a_Royal_Wedding.htm">Idioms about Royalty</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=394913">Idioms about Emotions </a></li> <li>Idioms about Birds – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Sun, 24 Jun 2018 22:12:23 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Ffor%5Fthe%5FStart%5Fof%5FSummer confusing English words, father, farther, further, Father’s Day, spelling, father, father meaning, male parent, Christianity, God, Holy Trinity, Roman Catholicism, priests, vocabulary lists, dictionary definitions, metaphorical, word definitions, Netflix Commonly Confused Words: Father vs. Farther vs. Further http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFather%5Fvs%2E%5FFarther%5Fvs%2E%5FFurther <p>Happy Father’s Day! Make sure you spell ‘father’ correctly on your card this year. <p><strong>What does father mean? </strong> <p><strong>Father</strong> is the word used to describe a male parent. In Christianity, God is also sometimes referred to as the <strong>Father</strong> (usually as the first person in the Holy Trinity) and in some churches (particularly within Roman Catholicism), <strong>Father </strong>is a term of address for priests. As a verb, the word refers to a man creating a child. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/father">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>father</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>My <strong>father’s</strong> favourite colour is yellow. </li> <li>The boy didn’t know his <strong>father</strong>. </li> <li>‘In the name of the <strong>Father</strong>, the Son, and the Holy Ghost,’ the vicar said. </li> <li>Our priest is called <strong>Father</strong> John.</li> <li>He <strong>fathered</strong> three children. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=father&Search=Search">here </a>to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>father</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Do farther and further mean the same thing?</strong></p> <p><strong>Further</strong> and <strong>farther</strong> are both used to describe something that is being extended or pushed to a more advanced stage. While some experts choose not to distinguish between the two words, and many people have been using the word interchangeably for centuries, there is a subtle difference you may wish to follow.</p> <p><strong>Farther</strong> is used to describe an extension of physical distance. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/farther">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>farther</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The rest stop was two miles <strong>farther</strong> than we expected. </li> <li>You’ll find the lighthouse <strong>farther</strong> along the coast. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=farther&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>farther</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Further</strong>, on the other hand, is used to describe an extension of metaphorical or figurative distance. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/further">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>further</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>She took a course as her manager said it would to help <strong>further </strong>her career. </li> <li>His sister was <strong>further</strong> along in the Netflix series, so he warned her not to give him any spoilers. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=further&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>further</strong>.</p> <p>This distinction can become complicated when you’re not sure whether something is a physical distance or a figurative one. If you are unsure, use <strong>further</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between father, farther and further?</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Far</strong>ther had the word <strong>far</strong> in it – both words relate to distance. Imagine the following conversation between two people: <ul> <li>‘How <strong>far</strong> is it?’ she asked. </li> <li>‘<strong>Far</strong>ther than you think,’ her friend replied. </li> </ul> </li> <li>When i<strong>Father’s</strong>n doubt, use <strong>further</strong>. </li> <li><strong>Father</strong> has the word <strong>fat</strong> in it. We’ll leave you to come up with your own <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">mnemonic</a> for this one – we don’t want to offend any dads on <strong>Farther's</strong> Day! </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_By_vs._Bye_vs._Buy.htm">By vs. Bye vs. Buy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hair_vs._Hare.htm">Hair vs. Hare</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">Heir vs. Air</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Sat, 16 Jun 2018 19:13:22 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FFather%5Fvs%2E%5FFarther%5Fvs%2E%5FFurther express yourself in English, is English difficult language to learn, second-language English, figurative, literal, English conversation, weather idioms, William Shakespeare, animal idioms, ants in your pants, birds eye view, raining cats and dogs How to use Idioms to Express Yourself More Interestingly http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5Fuse%5FIdioms%5Fto%5FExpress%5FYourself%5FMore%5FInterestingly <p>If you’re one of our regular readers you’ll be familiar with articles about idioms, but every now and then we like to share a recap for our new subscribers. Here are Spellzone we believe that one of the reasons English is such a difficult language to learn is because it’s full of idioms and every few weeks we take a list of popular idioms and translate them for our second-language English speakers. </p> <p>An idiom is an expression which has a figurative meaning rather than a literal one. For example, when someone says ‘<em>needle in a haystack</em>’ they probably aren’t actually talking about a needle and a haystack, but about something that is as difficult to find as a needle in a haystack would be. </p> <p>Here are our top three posts about idioms and expressions. How many of the idioms do you know, and which ones do you use in everyday conversation? </p> <ol> <li><strong>Idioms about Weather – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></strong><br /> <br /> Here in England, we love talking about the weather. The subject is such an essential part of small talk conversation that it’s no surprise that so many descriptions of weather have taken on figurative meanings as well. From ‘<em>fair-weather friend</em>’ to ‘<em>storm in a teacup</em>’ to ‘<em>in the doldrums</em>’, this article will help you add a little mood and atmosphere to your conversation. We also have <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">winter idioms</a> for if you’re feeling icy, <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">nature idioms</a> if you want to look further afield, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">idioms about the sea</a> for anyone who wants to delve deeper into the subject. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a> </strong><br /> <br /> Is there any other subject that has been written about as much as love? Find out what William Shakespeare had to say on the subject <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Insects.htm">here</a>. <br /> <br /> Possibly one of humankind’s greatest preoccupations, it’s no wonder that that many of the figurative expressions in the English language originate in matters of the heart. If you’re looking to up your romance game, you may not find all of these idioms useful, but we hope you enjoy the number of weird and wonderful ways of talking about love. You may also enjoy these articles on idioms about the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">heart</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=394913">emotions</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">friendship</a>. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm"><strong>Fifty Animal Idioms </strong></a><br /> <br /> This article was our first every piece on idioms and once we started looking for expressions about animals we were spoilt for choice. From ‘<em>ants in your pants</em>’, to ‘<em>birds-eye-view</em>’, to ‘<em>raining cats and dogs</em>’, we quickly found that animal-related idioms crop up throughout the English language and it was difficult to choose just fifty for our article. In the years since we shared this post, we haven’t been able to resist coming back to the subject and there’s no doubt we’ll return to it in the future as well. So if you’re after even more animal idioms, take a look at our articles on birds (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">part one</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_2.htm">part two</a>), <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">cats</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Insects.htm">insects</a>. </li> </ol> <p>What are some of your favourite expressions? </p> Tue, 12 Jun 2018 11:59:59 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5Fuse%5FIdioms%5Fto%5FExpress%5FYourself%5FMore%5FInterestingly idioms about insects, insect idioms, hive of activity, a flea in the ear, ants in your pants, as busy as a bee, as snug as a bug in a rug, bees knees, birds and the bees, bug-eyed, dropping like flies, fly in the ointment, fly on the wall, bug someone Twenty Idioms about Insects http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FInsects <ol> <li><strong>a hive of activity</strong> – a place/situation where everyone is busy</li> <li> <strong>a flea in (someone’s) ear</strong> – an unwelcome idea or answer </li> <li><strong>ants in your pants/antsy</strong> – agitated or restless due to nervousness or excitement</li> <li><strong>as busy as a bee</strong> – very busy </li> <li> <strong>as gaudy as a butterfly</strong> – very gaudy</li> <li><strong>as mad as a hornet</strong> – very angry</li> <li><strong>as snug as a bug (in a rug)</strong> – very comfortable/cosy </li> <li> <strong>bee’s knees</strong> – an excellent person or thing, of the highest quality </li> <li><strong>birds and the bees</strong> – a euphemism for the basic facts about reproduction as told to a child</li> <li><strong>bug-eyed</strong> – with bulging eyes<br /> </li> <li><strong>dropping like flies</strong> – dying or collapsing in large numbers, giving up on or pulling out of an endeavour <br /> </li> <li><strong> fly in the ointment</strong> – a small problem which nonetheless spoils the whole plan</li> <li><strong>fly on the wall </strong>– an unnoticed witness<br /> </li> <li> <strong>none of your beeswax</strong> – none of your business <br /> </li> <li><strong> to bug someone</strong> – to annoy someone<br /> </li> <li><strong>to have a bee in one’s bonnet</strong> – to be preoccupied/obsessed with something <br /> </li> <li><strong>to have butterflies in one’s stomach</strong> – to feel nervous/anxious/excited in your stomach<br /> </li> <li><strong> to make a beeline</strong> – to move swiftly and directly towards something or someone<br /> </li> <li><strong>to put a bug in someone’s ear about something</strong> – to give someone a hint about something<br /> </li> <li><strong>wouldn’t hurt a flea</strong> – wouldn’t hurt anyone or anything <br /> </li> </ol> <p>If you liked this post, check out our other articles on idioms:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Royalty_for_a_Royal_Wedding.htm">Idioms about Royalty</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=394913">Idioms about Emotions </a></li> <li>Idioms about Birds – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> </body> Mon, 04 Jun 2018 10:16:24 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FInsects tips for exam day success, end-of-years exams, A-levels, university finals, examination rules, maths exam, math exam, compass, protractor, calculator, art exam, art supplies, revision notes, brain and body in good shape, exam morning routine, spelling for Five Tips for Exam Day Success http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Ffor%5FExam%5FDay%5FSuccess <p>Whether you’re embarking upon end-of-years exams, A-levels, or university finals, here are five top tips to make sure your exam day goes as smoothly as possible:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Prepare everything you need the evening before </strong><br /> The evening before your exam, pack your bag for the following day. This will make sure you are less rushed in the morning.<br /> <br /> Start with everything you will need for the exam itself (or exams if you have more than one). Check whether are any rules about ink colour or writing in pencil. Pack extra pens and pencils, ink, and a sharpener and eraser. <br /> <br /> Will your exam require you to bring any specialist equipment? For a Maths exam, you may need a compass, protractor, or calculator. For an Art exam, you may need specific supplies for your project. Make sure you have these ready too. <br /> <br /> Finally prepare everything else you will need for the day. Plan an outfit with layers so that you can adjust it depending on the temperature of the exam room. Pack any food and drink you might need throughout the day. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Get an early night </strong><br /> Although your instinct may be to stay up late and go over your revision notes, now is the time to relax and make sure you have enough rest so that your brain and body are in good shape for your exam. <br /> <br /> Set yourself a bed time and stick to it. If you can’t sleep, try reading something that isn’t related to your exam, meditating, or listening to soothing music. Make sure you set multiple alarms for the next morning. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Get the most out of your morning routine </strong><br /> While you might be tempted to hit snooze on your alarm clock until you absolutely have to get up, a calm morning routine will really help you get into the right headspace for your exam. <br /> <br /> Help yourself wake up by listening to your favourite music while you get ready. You may even want to sing along loudly to help put yourself in a good mood. <br /> <br /> Even if you usually skip breakfast, today’s the day to eat something that will keep you full and energised throughout the day. Try porridge, bagels with peanut butter, or egg on toast. While you eat, you may be tempted look over some of your revision notes. While reading will help warm up your brain, avoid topics that are directly related to your exam. Try reading the news or a book instead. If you can’t resist looking over your notes, stick to key words or mnemonics – now is not the time to try and memorise pages of information. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Allow Plenty of Time to Arrive </strong><br /> There is nothing more stressful than running late on an exam day so make sure you allow yourself plenty of time to arrive. Check your route for any delays and leave earlier than you usually would. <br /> <br /> Arriving early also means you’ll have time to find out exactly where the exam is taking place and to freshen up before it begins. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Do your best! </strong><br /> Try and see your exams as an opportunity to show off your knowledge. Glance through the paper at the start of the test, allocate how much time you want to spend planning and answering each section, and just do your best! </li> </ol> <p>If you found this article useful, why not check out some of our other blog posts? </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Tests_to_Make_Sure_Your_Spelling_is_in_Top_Shape_for_Exam_Time.htm">Three Tests to Make Sure Your Spelling is in Top Shape for Exam Time</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Exam_Tips.htm">Exam Tips </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Using_Spellzone_Word_Lists_as_Part_of_Your_Exam_Preparation.htm">Using Spellzone Word Lists as Part of Your Exam Preparation</a></li> </ul> Tue, 29 May 2018 19:14:00 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Ffor%5FExam%5FDay%5FSuccess confusing english words, by, bye, buy, preposition, adverb, Spellzone, english dictionary, example english sentences, vocabulary lists, word lists Commonly Confused Words: By vs. Bye vs. Buy http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBy%5Fvs%2E%5FBye%5Fvs%2E%5FBuy <p><strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p><strong>By</strong> is a preposition that is used to identify who or what performed an action, the means by which something was achieved, the amount or size of a margin, a deadline or the end of a particular time period, the period in which something happens, or the location in relation to what is beside it. As an adverb it means ‘to go past a certain point’. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/by">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>by</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>The damage was caused <strong>by</strong> a tornado. </li> <li>The house was cleaned <strong>by</strong> my brother. </li> <li>He got full marks on his spelling test <strong>by</strong> practising every day.</li> <li>Coursework must be submitted <strong>by</strong> the end of the month. </li> <li>Owls hunt <strong>by</strong> night. </li> <li>There’s a new café <strong>by</strong> the market.</li> <li>We drove <strong>by</strong> the house. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=by&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>by</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Bye</strong> is a farewell remark which is short for ‘goodbye’.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/bye">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>bye</strong> used in an example sentence:</p> <ul> <li>‘Good<strong>bye</strong>,’ she called. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=bye&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>bye</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Buy</strong> is a verb meaning ‘to purchase’ or ‘to accept as true’.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/buy">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>buy</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The couple considered whether or not they could afford to <strong>buy</strong> a new car. </li> <li>Money can’t <strong>buy</strong> happiness. </li> <li>She didn’t <strong>buy</strong> the excuse her friend gave for his lateness. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=buy&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>buy</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between by, bye and buy?</strong></p> <p>Come up with a sentence or phase which uses each letter of the word to help you remember how to spell it. For example:</p> <ul> <li>My mother has my <strong>b</strong>aby photos filed <strong>b</strong>y <strong>y</strong>ear. </li> <li>‘<strong>B</strong>ye,’ <strong>y</strong>elled the <strong>e</strong>lephant.</li> <li><strong>b</strong>uy <strong>u</strong>mbrellas <strong>y</strong>early </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hair_vs._Hare.htm">Hair vs. Hare</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">Heir vs. Air</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 21 May 2018 16:10:13 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBy%5Fvs%2E%5FBye%5Fvs%2E%5FBuy Prince Harry, Meghan Markle, royal wedding, Prince Louis, royalty, idioms, word definitions, learn English language, Shakespeare, Richard III, beauty queen, drama queen, jewel in the crown, Hans Christian Anderson, British Nobility, spelling lists Idioms about Royalty for a Royal Wedding http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FRoyalty%5Ffor%5Fa%5FRoyal%5FWedding <p> With the birth of Prince Louis last month, and Prince Harry’s wedding to Meghan Markle just a few days away, we decided it was the perfect time to look at idioms about royalty.</p> <p>An idiom is a combination of words that has a figurative meaning separate from the actual definitions of the words used. With an estimated 25,000 idioms, it’s no wonder English is such a difficult language to learn! </p> <p>Here are the royalty-related idioms we managed to come up with – can you think of any others? </p> <ol> <li> <strong>a cat may look like a king</strong> – someone of low status still has rights </li> <li> <strong>a horse, a horse, a kingdom for my horse</strong> – a quotation from Shakespeare’s <em>Richard III</em> that is sometimes repeated ironically when someone needs something unimportant </li> <li><strong>a royal pain</strong> – an extremely annoying/tedious person or thing </li> <li><strong>beauty queen</strong> – the winner of a beauty contest </li> <li><strong>crowning glory</strong> – the best/most notable aspect of something</li> <li><strong>drama queen</strong> – someone who responds to situations in a melodramatic manner </li> <li><strong>fit for a king/queen</strong> – of very high quality </li> <li><strong>jewel in the crown</strong> – the most valuable or successful part of something </li> <li><strong>king’s ransom</strong> – a large amount of money </li> <li><strong>kingdom come</strong> – the afterlife </li> <li><strong>on the (porcelain) throne</strong> – using the toilet </li> <li><strong>Prince Charming</strong> – the name of a fairy tale hero that used to describe an ideal man who is both handsome and of good character </li> <li><strong>queen bee</strong> – a woman with a dominant position in a group or sphere </li> <li><strong>royal road to</strong> – an easy way of attaining something </li> <li><strong>the customer is king</strong> – the customer’s satisfaction is the highest priority </li> <li><strong>the emperor’s new clothes/the emperor has no clothes</strong> – a reference to a Hans Christian Anderson tale which describes a situation in which someone believes in the importance of something that is worthless </li> <li><strong>till/until kingdom come</strong> – forever </li> <li><strong>to be the king/queen of something</strong> – to be the best at something </li> <li><strong>to build castles in the air</strong> – to daydream about unattainable things </li> <li><strong>to court someone</strong> – to flatter or flirt with someone with the hope of winning their favour. </li> <li><strong>to crown it all</strong> – introducing the final event in a series of either very fortunate or very unfortunate events </li> <li><strong>to give the royal treatment</strong> – to treat or care for someone very well </li> <li><strong>to hold court</strong> – to be surrounded by admirers and the centre of attention </li> <li><strong>to live like a king/queen</strong> – to live in great comfort and luxury </li> <li><strong>to lord it over</strong> – to behave as if you are more important/know better than someone else </li> </ol> <p>Why not have a go at our <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=394913">British Nobility</a> spelling list? </p> <p>If you liked this post, check out our other articles on idioms:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=394913">Idioms about Emotions </a></li> <li>Idioms about Birds – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Tue, 15 May 2018 08:48:05 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FRoyalty%5Ffor%5Fa%5FRoyal%5FWedding confusing English words, hair, hare, similar english words, human skin, animal skin, Spellzone, English dictionary, dictionary definition of words, Goldilocks, Rapunzel, Medusa, vocabulary lists, long-eared mammal, example english sentences, Old English, Commonly Confused Words: Hair vs. Hare http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHair%5Fvs%2E%5FHare <p>Last week we looked at the difference between the words ‘<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">heir’ and ‘air’</a>. Here are two very similar words that people also often mix up. <p> <strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p><strong>Hairs</strong> are thin strands that grow from human and animal skin.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/hair">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>hair</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Goldilocks is famous for her golden <strong>hair</strong>. </li> <li>Rapunzel is famous for her extremely long <strong>hair</strong>. </li> <li>Medusa is famous for having snakes instead of <strong>hair</strong>.</li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=hair&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>hair</strong>. </p> <p>A <strong>hare</strong> is a fast, long-eared mammal similar to but larger than a rabbit. The word is also used as verb to describe running with great speed. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/hare">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>hare</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>In the story of the <strong>hare</strong> and the tortoise, the slow and steady tortoise wins the race.</li> <li>The dog <strong>hared</strong> after the ball. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=hare&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>hare</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Hair </strong>comes from the Old English ‘hær’ which in turn comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘khæran’. </p> <p><strong>Hare </strong>comes from the Old English ‘hara’ which in turn comes from the West Germanic ‘hasan’. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between hair and hare?</strong></p> <ul> <li>H<strong>are</strong> has the word <strong>are</strong> in it. Try using both in a sentence: ‘H<strong>are</strong>s <strong>are</strong> my favourite animal.’ </li> <li>H<strong>air</strong> has the word <strong>air</strong> in it. Try using both in a sentence: ‘She let her h<strong>air</strong> <strong>air</strong>-dry.’ </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heir_vs._Air.htm">Heir vs. Air</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Wed, 09 May 2018 11:56:47 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHair%5Fvs%2E%5FHare commonly confused English words, heir, air, inherit an estate, title, or office, Spellzone dictionary, Prince Charles, heir apparent, British throne, Harry Potter, Tom Riddle, Slytherin, oxygen, verb, broadcasting, vocabulary lists Commonly Confused Words: Heir vs. Air http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHeir%5Fvs%2E%5FAir <p> <strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p>An <strong>heir</strong> is a person who is entitled by law or by the terms of a will to inherit the estate, title, or office of another. The word is pronounced with a silent ‘<em>h</em>’ like ‘<em>air</em>’. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/heir">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>heir</strong> used in an example sentence:</p> <ul> <li>Prince Charles is the <strong>heir</strong> apparent to the British throne. </li> <li>In the <em>Harry Potter</em> series, Tom Riddle is Slytherin’s <strong>heir</strong>.</li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=heir&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word heir.<br /> </p> <p>The word <strong>air</strong> can refer to a mixture of gases (especially oxygen) required for breathing, the region of free space above the ground, or a distinctive but intangible quality or impression surrounding a person or thing. As a verb the word can refer to the act of exposing something to air or the act of broadcasting something on the television or radio.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/air">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>air</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The swimmer came up for <strong>air</strong>. </li> <li>The smell of fresh bread wafted through the <strong>air</strong>.</li> <li>He carried with him an <strong>air</strong> of superiority.</li> <li>Don’t forget to <strong>air</strong> out the bathroom after you’ve had a shower. </li> <li>The programme will <strong>air</strong> at 9pm. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=air&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word air.<br /> </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Heir</strong> is an Anglo-French word dating back to around 1300. It comes from the Latin ‘<em>heredem</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Air</strong> is a twelfth-century Old French word meaning ‘<em>atmosphere, breeze, weather</em>’ that has been used in English since around 1300. It comes from the Latin ‘<em>aer</em>’. The word has been used to mean ‘<em>expose to air</em>’ since the 1520s, to mean ‘<em>manner</em>’ or ‘<em>appearance</em>’ since the 1590s, and in a broadcasting sense since 1927.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between heir and air?</strong></p> <p><strong>Heir</strong> has the word <strong>he</strong> in it. Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘<strong>He</strong> was the <strong>heir</strong> to his family’s fortune.’ </p> <p>Try putting both words in the same sentence: ‘She is the <strong>heir</strong> to a large <strong>air</strong> travel company.’<br /> </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Words_for_the_Easter_break-cc_Faun_vs._Fawn.htm">Faun vs. Fawn</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 01 May 2018 19:59:42 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FHeir%5Fvs%2E%5FAir Spellzone, Shakespeare, William Shakespeare’s birthday, Shakespeare Day, William Shakespeare, the Bard, English words, idioms, love is blind, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Much Ado About Nothing, Othello Spellzone and Shakespeare http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spellzone%5Fand%5FShakespeare <p>Although we don’t know the exact date of William Shakespeare’s birthday, he was baptised on April 26th 1564. Scholars believe he was probably born on April 23rd, and so every year, on this date, people in the United Kingdom celebrate Shakespeare Day.</p> <p>At Spellzone we’re huge fans of William Shakespeare – so much so that we’ve written about him many times over the years. Indeed, the Bard is a difficult subject to avoid because so many English words, idioms, and expressions were made popular by their appearance in his work.</p> <p>Here are some of our favourite articles and resources on William Shakespeare and his plays:</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Shakespeare_in_Love.htm">Shakespeare in Love</a></strong></p> <p>Shakespeare is famous for both his romantic comedies and his romantic tragedies so it’s no wonder that some of the most famous phrases on the nature of love were made popular in his plays. Which play does the phrase ‘love is blind’ appear in? What about ‘star-crossed lovers’? Find out in this Valentine’s-Day-themed article.</p> <p><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_folder.cfm?Folder=190"><strong>Characters from Shakespeare's Plays</strong></a></p> <p>If you are a school or university student trying to get your head around the various names of Shakespeare’s characters and how to spell them, this is the resource for you. Learn how to spell the names of the characters in <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=9558">Twelfth Night</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=9556">Julius Caesar</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=8656">Much Ado About Nothing</a>, The Merchant of Venice (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=8218">part 1 </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=8219">part 2</a>), <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=6802">Othello</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5408">A Midsummer Night’s Dream</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5407">Romeo and Juliet</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5406">Macbeth</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5405">The Tempest</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5404">King Lear</a>.</p> <p>The word list feature is an essential part of Spellzone and allows you to personalise the course to suit your needs. This means if you’re studying a play that we don’t already have a word list, you can create your own <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a>.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Bard.htm">Word for Wednesday: Bard</a></strong></p> <p>Did you know that William Shakespeare was voted the United Kingdom’s greatest cultural icon by the British Council? If he were still alive today, the Bard would be 454 years old this year. In this post from our ‘Word for Wednesday’series, we look at the word ‘bard’ and where it comes from in more detail.</p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Puckish.htm">Puckish</a></strong></p> <p>‘Puckish’ is an adjective that describes someone who has a mischievous, playful sense of humour – like the fairy Puck. Puck does not come from one specific text, but is a type of character from English folklore, also known as Robin Goodfellow or Hobgoblin. The word refers to both an individual mischievous wood sprite or fairy, and a group of such creatures. It was William Shakespeare’s play <em>A Midsummer’s Night Dream</em> (believed to be written between 1590 and 1596) that most likely brought ‘Puck’ into popularity. This article is part of our ‘Words from Literature’ series – click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Meet_Mrs_Malaprop.htm">here</a> to learn about the word ‘puckish’ and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Quixotic.htm">here</a> to learn about the word ‘quixotic’.</p> <p><strong> <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Misremembered_Quotes_from_Macbeth.htm">Three Misremembered Quotes from Macbeth</a></strong></p> <p> In this article, we look at three passages from <em>Macbeth </em>that are often misquoted. Have you ever heard the phrase ‘hubble bubble toil and trouble’? What about ‘one foul swoop’? Click on the link to find out what the actual quotes are. </p> <p>Have a wonderful week!</p> Tue, 24 Apr 2018 09:49:31 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Spellzone%5Fand%5FShakespeare active voice, passive voice, how to phrase a sentence, verb, active verb, passive verb, English writing, research papers, english sentences, girls’ schools, boys’ schools, school league tables Active Voice vs. Passive Voice http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Active%5FVoice%5Fvs%2E%5FPassive%5FVoice <p> Depending on the way you phrase a sentence, a verb can be either active or passive. The active voice is more common in everyday writing, whereas the passive voice is usually used in formal documents such as official reports or research papers.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">subject</a> of a sentence is the person or thing the sentence is about. When the verb is <strong>active</strong>, it means the subject is <strong>doing</strong> the action that the verb indicates. If the verb is <strong>passive</strong>, it means the subject is having that the action the verb indicates <strong>done to them</strong>. The voice you choose to write a sentence in will help emphasise what the most important aspect of the sentence is. </p> <p>Let’s look at some examples of the <strong>active</strong> voice vs. the <strong>passive</strong> voice: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Active:</strong> <br /> <br /> ‘The girls’ school <strong>outranked</strong> the boys’ school in the league table.’ <br /> <br /> This sentence shows the reader that the important part of the sentence is the girls’ school’s success. It would work well in a piece promoting the school. <br /> <br /> </li> <li> <strong>Passive:</strong> <br /> <br /> “The boys’ school were <strong>outranked</strong> by the girls’ school in league table.” <br /> <br /> This sentence focuses on the boys’ school and so would be odd in a piece about the girls’ school. It would, however, work well in an article exploring whether boys and girls thrive under different learning methods. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Active: <br /> <br /> </strong>‘The university newspaper <strong>publishes</strong> job advertisements.’ <br /> <br /> This sentence emphasises the newspaper and would be useful when describing the types or articles and advertisements it publishes. <br /> <br /> </li> <li> <strong>Passive:</strong> <br /> <br /> ‘Job advertisements <strong>are published</strong> in the university newspaper.’ <br /> <br /> In this case, the job advertisements themselves are more significant than where they are published. This sentence might be useful when helping someone who is looking for a job. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Active: <br /> <br /> </strong>‘Hundreds of wild animals inhabit the park’. <br /> <br /> You might catch a wildlife lover’s attention with this sentence. The animals are more important than the park. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Passive:</strong> <br /> <br /> ‘The park is inhabited by hundreds of wild animals.’ <br /> <br /> This sentence draws attention to the park. It would work well in a tourism brochure that cites the park’s wildlife as one of many reasons to visit it.</li> </ul> <p><strong>If you found this article useful, why not check out some of our other posts?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Formatting_Speech.htm">Tips for Formatting Speech</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Eight_Tips_For_Creating_Mnemonics.htm">Eight Tips for Creating Mnemonics</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Exam_Tips.htm">Exam Tips</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Adding_Suffixes.htm">Five Tips for Adding Suffixes</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_Tips_for_Spelling_Words_with_Silent_Letters.htm">Five Tips for Spelling Words with Silent Letters</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_A_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /A/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/The_Seven_Ways_of_Spelling_the_Long_E_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /E/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_I_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /I/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Six_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_O_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /O/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Four_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_U_Sound.htm">How to Spell the Long /U/ Sound</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_To_Use_A_Semicolon.htm">How to Use a Semi Colon</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">When to Use Capital Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shoulda%2C_Coulda%2C_Woulda-cc_Using_Apostrophes_to_Indicate_Missing_Letters">How to Use Apostrophes to Indicate Missing Letters</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Using_Apostrophes.htm">Ten Tips for Using Apostrophes</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Handling_Homophones.htm">Tips for Handling Homophones</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Top_Tips_for_Forming_Abbreviations.htm">Top Tips for Forming Abbreviations</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Capital_Letters.htm">When to Use Capital Letters</a></li> <li>Word Classes (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">part one </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_2.htm">part two</a>)<br /> </li> </ul> <p> Have a great week! </p> Mon, 16 Apr 2018 09:43:59 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Active%5FVoice%5Fvs%2E%5FPassive%5FVoice idioms, emotion idioms, idioms of emotion, chip on your shoulder, aggressive behaviour, hard as nails, pleased as punch, at the end of your tether, cheesed off, down in the dumps, fools paradise, hopping mad, in stitches, on cloud nine, on the warpath Idioms about Emotion http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FEmotion <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" /> <title>Idioms about Emotion</title> </head> <body> <ol> <li> <strong>a chip on your shoulder</strong> - an ingrained resentment or grievance due to a feeling of inferiority and often marked by aggressive behaviour </li> <li><strong>afraid of your own shadow - </strong>easily frightened </li> <li><strong>as hard as nails</strong> - tough, strong/unfeeling, callous</li> <li><strong>as pleased as punch</strong> - delighted, proud </li> <li><strong>at the end of your tether/rope</strong> - to have lost all your patience </li> <li><strong>cheesed off</strong> - annoyed</li> <li><strong>down in the dumps</strong> - unhappy, depressed </li> <li><strong>foaming at the mouth</strong> - very angry </li> <li><strong>fool’s paradise</strong> - happiness predicated on ignoring potential problems or troubles </li> <li><strong>happy camper</strong> - someone who is comfortable and content </li> <li><strong>happy-go-lucky</strong> - cheerfully content, unconcerned about the future </li> <li><strong>hopping mad</strong> - extremely angry </li> <li><strong>in stitches</strong> - laughing uncontrollably </li> <li><strong>like a dog with two tails</strong> - delighted </li> <li><strong>on cloud nine </strong>- very happy </li> <li><strong>on the warpath</strong> - angry and eager for confrontation </li> <li><strong>on top of the world</strong> - very happy, elated </li> <li><strong>over the moon</strong> - delighted </li> <li><strong>to bite someone’s head off</strong> - to respond to someone sharply/angrily </li> <li><strong>to blow a fuse/blow your top</strong> - to lose your temper </li> <li><strong> to feel blue - </strong>to feel sad/depressed/melancholy </li> <li><strong>to fly off the handle</strong> - to suddenly lose your temper </li> <li><strong>to go through the roof</strong> - to suddenly become very angry </li> <li><strong>to go to pieces/fall apart</strong> - to become so nervous or upset that you are unable to behave/perform normally </li> <li><strong>up the wall</strong> - extremely annoyed/frustrated/angry </li> </ol> <p>If you found this post useful, why not take a look at some of our other articles about idioms?</p> <ul> <li>Idioms about Birds – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Birds-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> </body> </html> Thu, 12 Apr 2018 08:38:32 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Idioms%5Fabout%5FEmotion confusing English words, Easter break, faun, fawn, mythical beings, Roman mythology, The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, Mr Tumnus, young deer, Bambi, Old English, Middle English, Old French Confusing Words for the Easter break: Faun vs. Fawn http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Confusing%5FWords%5Ffor%5Fthe%5FEaster%5Fbreak%3A%5FFaun%5Fvs%2E%5FFawn <p><strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p><strong>Fauns</strong> are mythical beings from Roman mythology. They are part man and part goat.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/faun">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>faun</strong> used in an example sentence: </p> <ul> <li> In <em>The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe</em>, the main character Lucy befriends a <strong>faun</strong> called Mr Tumnus. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list using the <strong>faun</strong>. </p> <p>A <strong>fawn</strong> is a young deer. The word is used to describe the light grey-brown colour of young deer. If you <strong>fawn</strong> over someone it means you are trying to gain their favour through excessive flattery or devotion. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/fawn">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. </p> <p>Here is <strong>fawn</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>The film <em>Bambi</em> tells the story of a fawn growing up in the forest. </li> <li>He decorated the living room in <strong>fawn</strong>, blue, and moss green. </li> <li>She was embarrassed by the way the others <strong>fawned</strong> over her. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=fawn&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>fawn</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Faun</strong> comes from the Old English ‘fægnian’ which means ‘<em>rejoice, be glad, exult, applaud</em>’. The word was used in Middle English to describe to expressions of delight, particularly in relation to a dog wagging its tail. </p> <p><strong>Fawn</strong> comes from the Old French ’<em>faon, feon</em>’ meaning ‘<em>young animal</em>’ which comes from the Latin ‘<em>fetus</em>’ meaning ‘<em>a bringing forth; an offspring</em>’. The word was used to describe colour from 1881. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between faun and fawn? </strong></p> <p><strong>Fawn</strong> has the letters <strong>aw</strong> in it. Think of the sound someone might make upon seeing a young deer or when fawning over someone or something. Try saying the following sentence to yourself: ‘<strong>Aw</strong>, look at the baby deer learning to walk,’ he <strong>fawned</strong> when he saw the <strong>fawn</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Yolk_vs._Yoke.htm">Yolk vs. Yoke</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Mon, 09 Apr 2018 10:33:17 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Confusing%5FWords%5Ffor%5Fthe%5FEaster%5Fbreak%3A%5FFaun%5Fvs%2E%5FFawn confusing English words, Easter, difference yolk and yoke, Happy Easter, egg yoke, egg yolk, spherical, albumen, Spellzone dictionary, fry eggs, break the yolk, soft boiled eggs, runny yolk, vocabulary lists, draft animals, Old English Commonly Confused Words: Yolk vs. Yoke http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FYolk%5Fvs%2E%5FYoke <p> Happy Easter! This week we have a themed post for our Commonly Confused Words series. <p>Make sure you don’t say egg <strong>yoke</strong> when you mean egg <strong>yolk</strong>! <p><strong>What does each word mean? </strong> <p>The <strong>yolk</strong> is the yellow spherical part of an egg. It is surrounded by albumen which is white. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/yolk">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p> Here is <strong>yolk</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>Whenever he tried to fry eggs he always ended up accidentally breaking the <strong>yolk</strong>. </li> <li>I like soft-boiled eggs so I can dip my toast into the runny <strong>yolk</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=yolk&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>yolk</strong>.</p> <p>A <strong>yoke</strong> is a wooden restraint used to join two draft animals at the neck so they can work together. The word is also used metaphorically to refer to something that is oppressive. As a verb, <strong>yoke</strong> describes to the act of joining things together.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/yoke">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>yoke</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The bullocks pulled against the <strong>yoke</strong>. </li> <li>We fought against the <strong>yoke</strong> of tyranny. </li> <li>They <strong>yoked</strong> the horses and put them to work. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=yoke&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>yoke</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Yolk </strong>comes from the Old English ‘<em>geolca, geoloca</em>’ which means ‘<em>the yellow part</em>’ and in turn comes from ‘<em>geolu</em>’ which means ‘<em>yellow</em>’. The word used to be spelt ‘<em>yelk</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Yoke</strong> comes from the Old English ‘<em>geocian</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to join together</em>’. This comes from ‘<em>geoht</em>’ which means ‘<em>contrivance for fastening a pair of draft animals together</em>’ and comes from the Proto-Germanic ‘<em>yukam</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between yolk and yoke?</strong></p> <p>Think of a hen <strong>l</strong>aying an egg to help you remember yo<strong>l</strong>k has an <strong>l</strong> in it.</p> <p>Say the following sentence to yourself: ‘The horses br<strong>oke</strong> free from their y<strong>oke</strong>’. </ul> </p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Balmy_vs._Barmy.htm">Balmy vs. Barmy</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Moot_vs._Mute.htm">Moot vs. Mute</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Thu, 29 Mar 2018 08:37:59 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FYolk%5Fvs%2E%5FYoke