Spelling English spelling blog http://www.spellzone.com/ Information about all things regarding spelling, English language, English teaching, language help and learning and foreign languages English, spelling, language Spelling English spelling course http://www.spellzone.com/images/spellzone_name_on_small.jpg http://www.spellzone.com/ Shakespeare in Love, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, music be the food of love, Love is blind, The Merchant’s Tale, the Bard, The Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet Shakespeare in Love http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shakespeare%5Fin%5FLove <p> Many English words, idioms, and expressions were made popular by their appearance in the works of <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/lists_folder.cfm?Folder=190">William Shakespeare</a>. Here are four expressions in which Shakespeare comments on the nature of love: </p> <p><strong>1. If music be the food of love, play on</strong></p> <p>This expression is quoting Duke Orsino from <em>Twelfth Night</em>. Frustrated by his unsuccessful courtship of Countess Olivia, he says:</p> <p align="center">‘If music be the food of love, play on; <br /> Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, <br /> The appetite may sicken, and so die.<br /> That strain again! it had a dying fall: <br /> O, it came o'er my ear like the sweet sound, <br /> That breathes upon a bank of violets, <br /> Stealing and giving odour! Enough; no more:<br /> 'Tis not so sweet now as it was before.<br /> O spirit of love! how quick and fresh art thou, <br /> That, notwithstanding thy capacity <br /> Receiveth as the sea, nought enters there, <br /> Of what validity and pitch soe'er, <br /> But falls into abatement and low price, <br /> Even in a minute: so full of shapes is fancy <br /> That it alone is high fantastical.’ </p> <p><strong>2. Love is blind </strong></p> <p>Though this expression first appeared in Chaucer’s <em>The Merchant’s Tale</em>, around a hundred and fifty years before Shakespeare birth, the phrase pops up in many of the Bard’s plays too. </p> <p>In <em>The Merchant of Venice</em>, Jessica says: </p> <p align="center">‘Here, catch this casket; it is worth the pains. <br /> I am glad 'tis night, you do not look on me, <br /> For I am much ashamed of my exchange: <br /> But love is blind and lovers cannot see <br /> The pretty follies that themselves commit; <br /> For if they could, Cupid himself would blush <br /> To see me thus transformed to a boy.’ </p> <p>The phrase also appears in <em>Two Gentlemen of Verona and Henry V</em>. </p> <p><strong>3. Star-crossed lovers </strong></p> <p><em>Romeo and Juliet</em>, perhaps the most famous romantic tale of all, opens with the following prologue which tells us what the story is going to be about: </p> <p align="center">‘Two households, both alike in dignity <br /> (In fair Verona, where we lay our scene), <br /> From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, <br /> Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. <br /> From forth the fatal loins of these two foes <br /> A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life, <br /> Whose misadventured piteous overthrows <br /> Doth with their death bury their parents' strife. <br /> The fearful passage of their death-marked love <br /> And the continuance of their parents' rage, <br /> Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove, <br /> Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage -<br /> The which, if you with patient ears attend, <br /> What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.’ </p> <p><strong>Star-crossed</strong> means inevitable, thwarted by bad luck, doomed by the stars. By telling us the story at the beginning of the play, Shakespeare suggests that there is nothing his characters could have done to prevent the tragedy that befalls them. </p> <p><strong>4. The course of true love never did run smooth </strong></p> <p><em>A Midsummer Night’s Dream</em> is a comedy about the complicated and often messy nature of love. Lysander loves Hermia who has been promised to someone else. He tries to reassure her by saying:</p> <p align="center">‘Ay me! for aught that I could ever read, <br /> Could ever hear by tale or history, <br /> The course of true love never did run smooth; <br /> But, either it was different in blood,--‘. </p> <p>Happy Valentine’s Day!</p> Wed, 14 Feb 2018 10:46:00 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Shakespeare%5Fin%5FLove writing English tips, improve my writing, writing style, academic essays, writing a blog post, writing tone and style, letter of complaint, letter to a friend, American English spelling and grammar conventions, redundant expressions, meaning of English Five Tips to Help You Improve Your Writing http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Fto%5FHelp%5FYou%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting <p><strong> 1) Why are you writing and who are you writing for? </strong></p> <p>Before you start writing, it is important to ask yourself these two questions and adapt your writing style accordingly. This is because the purpose and intended audience of an academic essay is, for example, is very different to that of a blog post. Similarly, the tone and style of a letter of complaint is very different to that of a letter to a friend, and both of these are different to the tone and style of an email or text message. </p> <p>If you are writing for university coursework or for a publication, make sure you are aware of any style guides you should follow. The whereabouts of your audience may also affect how you choose to write something. If you are writing for an American audience, for example, you may wish to use American English spelling and grammar conventions. </p> <p>If you keep the answers to these two questions in mind throughout the writing process, it will help avoid wasting time and words on irrelevant tangents. </p> <p><strong>2) Plan before you begin </strong></p> <p>Another way to make sure you don’t go off topic in your writing is by beginning with a plan. List the key points you want to make and organise your information into a clear structure. This will help make sure your writing flows well and that your message is communicated clearly. </p> <p><strong>3) Clarity, Clarity, Clarity! </strong></p> <p>Don’t forget that while you know a lot about the subject you’re writing about, your reader may not. </p> <p>As you write your piece, ask yourself why you are including each piece of information and what the information will add to your reader’s understanding of the subject. It is important to make sure your reader is neither left without enough information to understand the point you are trying to make nor overloaded with so much information that your point gets lost. </p> <p>You can help guide your reader through your writing by making it clear how each point relates to the one before and after it. Think carefully about the order of your sentences and how this affects the way you are communicating information. Depending on your audience and the writing style you have chosen, it may be appropriate to use headings to break down information. </p> <p><strong>4) Don’t use redundant expressions </strong></p> <p>If your writing contains redundant expressions, a reader might think that you do not fully understand the meaning of the words you are using or that you are choosing them sloppily. While it might be tempting to use a longer or more unusual word because it might make you seem more knowledgeable about a subject, your writing will have quite the opposite effect if you don’t use the word correctly. </p> <p>We recommend always looking up a word in the dictionary if you are unsure of what it means and removing it from your writing if it means the same thing as another word you have already used. Don’t forget, it is always better to use fewer words and make your point clearly than it is to use more and make it convolutedly. </p> <p>You can read more about redundant expressions <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Improve_Your_Writing_by_Avoiding_Redundant_Expressions.htm">here</a>. </p> <p><strong>5) Be Consistent </strong></p> <p>Once you have chosen an appropriate writing style, make sure you stick to it. As you write you will have to make a series of decisions, for example: </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Tips_for_Forming_Plurals.htm">Should I use the plural ‘cacti’ or the plural ‘cactuses’? </a></li> <li>How should I format the date? </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">Should I use an Oxford comma? </a></li> </ul> <p>Be intentional as you make these decisions and make sure you are consistent throughout your writing. If you choose to use the Latin plural ‘cacti’ in one instance, don’t later use the English plural ‘cactuses’. Consistency is key!</p> Fri, 09 Feb 2018 15:40:15 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Five%5FTips%5Fto%5FHelp%5FYou%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting English language, idioms, figurative meaning, word definitions, plain English, common English, bite the bullet, American Civil War, Indian Rebellion, British Army, Hindu soldiers, Muslim soldiers, caught red handed, poaching, keep at bay Three Popular Idioms and their Origin Stories http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Three%5FPopular%5FIdioms%5Fand%5Ftheir%5FOrigin%5FStories <p>One of the reasons <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_reasons_why_English_spelling_is_so_difficult.htm">English is so difficult to learn</a> is because it is a language full of idioms. An idiom is a combination of words that has a figurative meaning separate from the actual definitions of the words used. There are an estimated 25,000 idioms in the English language.</p> <p>Here on the blog, in one of our regular features, we translate popular idioms into plain English. Today we are going to look at three common English idioms and how and why they came to be associated with their figurative meanings. </p> <p><strong>1) Bite the Bullet </strong><br /> If someone is described as biting the bullet, it means they are finally doing a difficult or unpleasant task they’ve been putting off.</p> <p>One theory behind the origin of this phrase is that soldiers, in the days before anaesthetics were effective or readily available, would bite down on bullets to help them tolerate pain. However, the most frequently cited origin of the phrase is during the American Civil War which began in 1861 and at least ten years after military surgeons began using ether and chloroform to anaesthetise patients. </p> <p>Another theory is that the phrase originated during the Indian Rebellion of 1857 when native Indian fighters, recruited by the British Army, were using rifles with greased paper cartridges which needed to be bitten to release powder. Hindu soldiers were concerned that the paper was greased with cow fat while Muslim soldiers worried that it was greased with pig fat. It is said that phrase comes from the expectation that soldiers ignored their religious concerns and ‘<em>bit the bullet</em>’ anyway.</p> <p>However, the phrase appears before both the American Civil War and the Indian Rebellion in Francis Grose’s 1796 <em>A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue</em>. Its true origin remains a mystery. </p> <p><strong>2) Caught Red-Handed</strong><br /> If someone is caught red-handed, it means that they are caught in the act of doing something they shouldn’t be doing. They phrase come from the idea of having blood on one’s hands after committing murder or poaching. The phrase was first used in the <em>Scottish Acts of Parliament of James I </em>in 1432 and has appeared in many legal documents since. </p> <p><strong>3) Keep at Bay</strong><br /> If you keep something (or someone) at bay, it means you are keeping it (or them) from approaching or having an effect. </p> <p>It might seem that this phrase has nautical origins; the idea of keeping a ship at bay and not allowing it to enter port makes sense. In fact, the story behind this phrase is completely different. </p> <p>The phrase entered English via the Old French ‘<em>abbay</em>’ which means ‘<em>barking</em>’ and evolved first into ‘<em>aba</em>y’ and then ‘<em>at bay</em>’. In the fourteenth century, the term ‘at a bay’ was used to describe hunting hounds that were barking. The phrase also came to describe animals which were in a standoff with a barking dog that was intent on killing them. The first recorded use of the phrase in its figurative meaning was in the eighteenth century.</p> <p>If you found this post interesting, you can read more about idiom origins <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/American_Idioms.htm">here</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween-cc_Three_everyday_idioms_and_their_terrifying_origins.htm">here</a>. You may also find our idiom translation articles useful: <br /> </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Idioms for Winter</a></li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="https://www.phrases.org.uk/">The Phrase Finder</a></p> Tue, 30 Jan 2018 11:24:08 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Three%5FPopular%5FIdioms%5Fand%5Ftheir%5FOrigin%5FStories confusing English words, moot, mute, argument, debate, insignificant, irrelevant, Spellzone, moot point, vocabulary lists, verb, muffling, noun, adjective, dictionary definition,example English sentences, old English, English spelling, old French, rhyming Commonly Confused Words: Moot vs. Mute http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FMoot%5Fvs%2E%5FMute <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>If something is <strong>moot</strong>, it is open to argument or debate. <strong>Moot</strong> can also be used to describe something that is insignificant or irrelevant.Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/moot">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>moot</strong> used in an example sentence: <ul> <li> It was a <strong>moot</strong> point. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list using the word <strong>moot</strong>.</p> <p>The verb <strong>mute</strong> describes the act of muffling or silencing a noise. As a noun, <strong>mute</strong> is used to refer to both someone who is unable to speak and something used to soften the sound of an instrument. As an adjective, the word describes someone who is unable to speak.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/mute">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>mute</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He <strong>muted</strong> the television while the commercials were on. </li> <li>The man was as silent as a <strong>mute</strong>.</li> <li>She stood there, <strong>mute</strong>, while as she processed what her friend was saying. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=mute&Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>mute</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Moot</strong> derives from the Old English ‘<em>motian</em>’ which means ‘<em>to meet, talk, discuss</em>’. The word has been used in English since the twelfth century.</p> <p><strong>Mute</strong> first entered English as ‘<em>mewet</em>’ in the late fourteenth century from the Old French ‘<em>muet</em>’ meaning ‘<em>dumb, mute</em>’. By the 1570s the word was used to describe a ‘<em>stage actor in a dumb show</em>’ and by the 1610s to a ‘<em>person who does not speak</em>’. The word was first used in reference something that <strong>muted</strong> a musical instrument in 1811 and later to describe the act of muffling a sound in 1861.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between moot and mute?</strong></p> <p>Use rhyming words to help you remember the spellings of each word:</p> <ul> <li><strong>moot</strong> rhymes with boot </li> <li><strong>mute</strong> rhymes with cute. </ul> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">Bow vs. Bough</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 30 Jan 2018 10:54:06 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FMoot%5Fvs%2E%5FMute Janus Words, January, the god of beginnings and transitions, New Year, English words, contradictory meanings, contronyms, auto antonyms, apology, buckle, cleave, custom, hold up, literally, model, overlook, English teachers, quiddity, temper, short trip t More Janus Words http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=More%5FJanus%5FWords <p> The month January takes its name from <a href="http://goarticles.com/article/The-Roman-God-Janus-and-Auto-Antonyms/5069113/">Janus</a>, the god of beginnings and transitions (and so it is appropriate that January is the month that marks the transition into the New Year). Janus is usually depicted with two heads – one looking back into the past, and the other looking forward to the future.</p> <p>Last January we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Janus_Words.htm">20 Janus words</a>. A Janus word is a word with contradictory meanings. These words are also known as contronyms and auto antonyms. </p> <p>Here are some more examples of Janus words: </p> <ul> <li><strong>Apology</strong>: an expression of regret for causing someone trouble, a formal written defence of something <ul> <li>I owe you an apology for using your computer without asking first. </li> <li>She wrote an apology for the hunting ban. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Bill</strong>: a payment, an invoice/to invoice <ul> <li>We argued over who would pay the restaurant bill. </li> <li>They forgot to bill us for our dessert. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Buckle</strong>: to fasten, to fold/collapse <ul> <li>She buckled her belt. </li> <li>The bench buckled under the weight of the bags. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Cleave</strong>: to stick, to sever/split <ul> <li>He was so nervous his tongue cleaved to the roof of his mouth. </li> <li>She cleaved wood for the fire. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Custom</strong>: a common/traditional practice, something that is bespoke/made-to-order <ul> <li>One Christmas custom is to exchange gifts. </li> <li>He bought her a custom guitar for Christmas. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Hold up</strong>: to support, to obstruct <ul> <li>We held up the frame where we wanted to hang it to see how it would look. </li> <li>I held my parents up while my sister could sneaked out. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Literally</strong>: actually, figuratively <ul> <li>The teacher hadn’t meant for his students to take him literally when he told them he expected them to spend every minute of the day studying. </li> <li>‘I expect you to be revising literally every minute of every day,’ her mother told her. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Model</strong>: an excellent example of a particular quality, a copy or representation of something <ul> <li>The new building was a model of innovative architecture. </li> <li>They asked for a model, to scale, of the planned building. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Off</strong>: activated, deactivated <ul> <li>The alarm went off. </li> <li>The alarm was off. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Overlook</strong>: to fail to notice/to ignore, to supervise <ul> <li>He was overlooked for a promotion. </li> <li>She overlooked several large projects and managed a team of fifty. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Put out</strong>: to extinguish, toproduce and circulate <ul> <li> ‘Don’t forget to put out the campfire before you go to sleep,’ she warned. </li> <li>Ms Thomas, the English teacher, supervised the students who put out to school newspaper. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Quiddity</strong>: the inherent nature of something, a peculiar or distinctive feature <ul> <li>His work explores the quiddity of human experience. </li> <li>She found his quirks and quiddities attractive. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Temper</strong>: to strengthen, to soften/dilute/neutralise <ul> <li>They gave us a tempered steel pan as a house-warming gift.</li> <li>The hot sun was tempered by a light breeze. </li> </ul> </li> <li><strong>Trip</strong>: a journey, a stumble <ul> <li>We’re taking a short trip to Europe. </li> <li>He tripped over his untied shoelace. </li> </ul> </li> </ul> <p>Have a good week!</p> Mon, 15 Jan 2018 15:41:11 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=More%5FJanus%5FWords improve your spelling, Spelling Ability Test, spelling course, English spelling test, baseline spelling score, interactive spelling test, spelling, word lists, Listen and Spell, spelling games, printable worksheets, vocabulary lists Make the Most of Spellzone in 2018 http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Make%5Fthe%5FMost%5Fof%5FSpellzone%5Fin%5F2018 <p> Is your New Year’s resolution to improve your spelling? Here are three tips to help you make the most of your Spellzone subscription:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Take the Spellzone Spelling Ability Test </strong><br /> Our Spelling Ability Test will help you work out a base spelling level and provide you with a tailored version of the course depending on your results and any gaps in your knowledge - your personal Course Pathway. <br /> <br /> You will be tested on the spellings of a series of words which will get progressively more difficult. Each word that appears in the test relates to a course unit and the test will finish once you spell a set percentage of words incorrectly. You will then be given a baseline Spellzone Score to help you track your progress and achievements. You will be retested after every eight course units completed and the test results will tell you if you need to retake any units and which units to move onto next.<br /> <br /> You can find out more about the Spelling Ability Test <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/New_Spelling_Ability_Test.htm">here</a>. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Work through your personal Course Pathway </strong><br /> Once we have worked out your personal Course Pathway, you will be ready to work though the Spellzone course. The Spellzone course units will take you through the various English spelling rules and their exceptions. At the end of each unit, there is an interactive test. <br /> <br /> As long as you have your username and password, you can work through your Course Pathway on any device that connects to the internet. This means you that you can access your account from home even if it has been set up for you by your school, university, or workplace. If your New Year’s resolution is to work on your spelling, we recommend using Spellzone as regularly as your schedule allows. Challenge yourself to study your Course Pathway for a set number of minutes each day or commit to completing a set number of units each month. <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Personalise Spellzone to Suit Your Needs </strong><br /> The Spellzone word list feature is a great way to adapt Spellzone to suit your needs. You can use all word lists with two testing methods: <em>Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check</em> and <em>Listen and Spell </em>as well in six spelling games and as printable worksheets. You can find out more about how to use these to improve your spelling <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Tests_to_Make_Sure_Your_Spelling_is_in_Top_Shape_for_Exam_Time.htm">here</a>.<br /> <br /> While we already have a huge collection of existing word lists – in a wide array of subjects – the best way to make sure you’re practising the vocabulary most relevant to your subject or field is to create your own lists. <br /> <br /> The following word lists, for example, are very useful for students who are studying Shakespeare: <ul> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5408">Characters in A Midsummer Night's Dream </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5407">Characters in Romeo and Juliet </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5406">Characters in Macbeth</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5405">Characters in The Tempest </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list.cfm?wordlist=5404">Characters in King Lear</a></li> </ul> </li> </ol> <blockquote> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/index.cfm">here</a> to find out more about Spellzone word lists and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Using_Spellzone_Word_Lists_as_Part_of_Your_Exam_Preparation">here</a> to learn how to create your own. </p> </blockquote> <p>We hope these tips will help you make the most of Spellzone in 2018 – please let us know if you have any questions. Happy New Year! </p> Tue, 09 Jan 2018 11:12:50 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Make%5Fthe%5FMost%5Fof%5FSpellzone%5Fin%5F2018 English spelling website, spelling and grammar goals, confusing English words, English spelling resources, students learning English, idioms in the English language, ways to spell, long u sound, grammar and punctuation, improve your English writing, Engli 2017 Blog Round Up http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=2017%5FBlog%5FRound%5FUp <p>Happy New Year!</p> <p>Whether you are a regular user of our English spelling website or someone who’s just signed up, we hope 2018 will be a great year for improving your spelling. Here are some of our favourite blog posts from 2017: </p> <ul> <li>We began the year by coming up with <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/17_Spelling_and_Grammar_Goals_for_2017.htm">seventeen spelling and grammar goals for 2017</a> – how many did you achieve? </li> <li>As usual we looked at pairs and groups of confusing words and shared tips and tricks to help you tell them apart. This year we looked at: <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">alternate vs. alternative</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">bated vs. baited</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Deck_the_Halls-cc_Bow_vs._Bough.htm">bough vs. bow</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">complacent vs. complaisant</a>, <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">conscious vs. conscience</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">curb vs. kerb</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">elicit vs. illicit</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">everyday vs. every day</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">flare vs. flair</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flaunt_vs._Flout.htm">flaunt vs. flout</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">hear vs. here</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">poll vs. pole</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">son vs. sun</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">wait vs. weight</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">who vs. whom</a>. </li> <li>As a resource for our students who are learning English, we continued looking at the definitions of popular idioms in the English language. In 2017, we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">idioms about love</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Words_and_Idioms_about_Mothers_and_Parenting.htm">idioms about mothers and parenting</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Eggy_Idioms_for_Easter.htm">idioms about eggs</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">idioms about science and technology</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">idioms about dancing</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">idioms about cats</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">idioms about friendship</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween!_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">idioms about death</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">idioms about winter</a>. </li> <li>We finished the series we started back in 2016 by looking at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Four_Ways_to_Spell_the_Long_U_Sound.htm">Four Ways to Spell the Long U Sound</a>.</li> <li>To help our students feel confident with their grammar and punctuation, we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Use_Commas_as_Part_of_a_List.htm">how to use commas as part of a list</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Use_Commas_in_Direct_Speech.htm">how to use commas in direct speech</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Formatting_Speech.htm">how to format speech</a>, word classes (<a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_1.htm">part one</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_Classes-cc_Part_2.htm">part two</a>), <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Pronouns.htm">pronouns</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Subjects_and_Objects.htm">subject and object</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commas_and_Clauses.htm">how to use commas to separate clauses</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Hyphens_in_Compound_Words.htm">how to use hyphens in compound words</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Other_Ways_of_Using_Hyphens.htm">further tips for using hyphens</a>, <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Apostrophe_Errors.htm">common apostrophe errors</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Words_with_Sneaky_Past_Tense_Forms.htm">confusing verb tenses</a>. We also shared a post recapping our favourite <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grammar_and_Punctuation_Tips.htm">grammar and punctuation articles</a> from over the years. </li> <li>We offered advice on how to improve your writing by <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/How_to_Improve_Your_Writing_by_Avoiding_Redundant_Expressions.htm">avoiding redundant expressions</a> and shared <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Ten_Redundant_Expressions_You_Should_Stop_Using.htm">ten redundant expressions to stop using</a>. We looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Words_People_Often_Say_Wrong.htm">words that people often pronounce incorrectly</a>. We shared <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tips_for_Handling_Homophones.htm">tips for handling confusing homophones</a>. </li> <li>While exploring interesting aspects of the English language, we looked at <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Janus_Words.htm">Janus words</a>, the origins of <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Eggy_Idioms_for_Easter.htm">three eggy idioms</a>, and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Who_are_these_Christmas_Characters-qq.htm">these famous Christmas characters</a>. We also looked at the significance of <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Gold%2C_Frankincense_and_Myrrh.htm">gold, frankincense and myrrh</a>. </li> </ul> <p>What did you enjoy most on our blog in 2017, and what would you like to see more of? Which articles have you found the most useful? Let us know so that we can make 2018’s articles as useful as possible. You can contact us via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/Spellzone">Facebook</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/spellzone">Twitter</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/contact.cfm">email</a>, or by leaving a comment below. We’d also love to hear what your 2018 spelling resolutions are.</p> <p>Once again, from all the team at Spellzone, we hope you have a very happy new year!</p> Wed, 03 Jan 2018 15:13:27 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=2017%5FBlog%5FRound%5FUp Gold, Frankincense, Myrrh, Christmas carol, We Three Kings, three kings, follow a star, Jesus, British schools, Bethlehem, Proto-Germanic, prayer, holiness, Boswellia trees, North Africa, Somalia, Bible, Old English, Latin Gold, Frankincense and Myrrh http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Gold%2C%5FFrankincense%5Fand%5FMyrrh <p>The Christmas carol <em>We Three Kings</em> tells the story of three kings who followed a star to visit Jesus in a stable just after he was born. Many British school children learn this story at a very young age and can recite the names of the gifts each king gave to Jesus: gold, frankincense, and myrrh. While gold is still well-known today, what are frankincense and myrrh? Do the three gifts have a special significance? The verses to the carol give us a hint – let’s look at them a little more closely.</p> <p><strong>Gold</strong></p> <p>‘Born a King on Bethlehem’s plain <br /> Gold I bring to crown Him again, <br /> King forever, ceasing never, <br /> Over us all to reign.’</p> <p>Gold is a precious metal which has long been valued for its rarity, softness (which makes it easy to cast into coins, jewellery, and ornaments), and bright yellow colour. The word derives from the Proto-Germanic ‘ghultham’ from the PIE root ‘ghel’ which means ‘to shine’. Gold is still treasured today and is symbolically associated with being ‘the best’ and ‘most precious’: gold medals and trophies are often awarded to winners, wedding rings are often cast from gold, fiftieth anniversaries and jubilees are referred to as ‘golden’. In this verse of <em>We Three Kings</em>, Jesus is presented with gold to celebrate his royalty. The gesture is an acknowledgement that he is ‘King forever’. </p> <p><strong>Frankincense </strong></p> <p>‘Frankincense to offer have I; <br /> Incense owns a Deity nigh; <br /> Prayer and praising, all men raising, <br /> Worship Him God Most High.’ </p> <p>The verse tells us that Frankincense is some kind of incense used in prayer, so we can deduce that the gift is offered to Jesus to acknowledge his holiness. Frankincense is a resin that comes from Boswellia trees. It is hardened and used in incenses and perfumes. Frankincense has been traded in North Africa and Somalia for over five thousand years and is mentioned in the Bible as a consecrated incense. The word comes from the old French ‘franc’ meaning ‘noble’ or ‘pure’ and ‘encens’ meaning ‘incense’. </p> <p><strong>Myrrh</strong> </p> <p>‘Myrrh is mine, its bitter perfume <br /> Breathes a life of gathering gloom; <br /> Sorrowing, sighing, bleeding, dying, <br /> Sealed in the stone-cold tomb.’ </p> <p>We know from the verse that myrrh is used as a perfume. Like Frankincense, it is made from a resin which is extracted from a tree and hardened. The word comes from the Old English ‘myrre’ which comes from the Latin ‘myrrha’. Both words come from a root word meaning ‘was bitter’ and as the verse suggests the perfume was known for its bitter qualities. One interpretation of the story is that myrrh was given to symbolise the bitterness and suffering that Jesus would experience in his later life.</p> <p>If you enjoyed this post, you can find more of our Christmas articles here: </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Who_are_these_Christmas_Characters-qq.htm">Who is Parson Brown?</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Christmas_with_Spellzone.htm">Christmas with Spellzone</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tis_the_Season_for_Christmassy_Idioms.htm">Christmassy Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Popular_Christmas_Characters.htm">Three Popular Christmas Characters</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/What_the_Dickens-qq.htm">What the Dickens? </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grottos,_caverns,_and_killing_curses.htm">Grottos, Caverns, and Curses </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_word_games_to_get_you_through_the_Christmas_season.htm">Christmas Games </a></li> <li>Word for Wednesdays: <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Advent.htm">advent</a>, <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Pudding.htm">pudding</a>, and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Reindeer.htm">reindeer </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzonehttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Advent_Anagram_Answers%21">Advent Anagrams</a></li> </ul> <p>From all the team at Spellzone, MERRY CHRISTMAS! <br /> </p> Tue, 26 Dec 2017 10:46:12 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Gold%2C%5FFrankincense%5Fand%5FMyrrh Christmas characters, celebrate Christmas, Christmas songs, Christmas books, snowman, Winter Wonderland, Parson Brown, fairy tale, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Gene Autry, Frosty the Snowman, Cass County Boys, Christmas idioms, Winter idioms, Dickens, Who are these Christmas Characters? http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Who%5Fare%5Fthese%5FChristmas%5FCharacters%2Dqq <p>With Christmas less than a week away, it’s time to celebrate here at Spellzone. Today we’re looking at two famous Christmas songs and some characters who feature in them. Where do these characters come from? Are they based on real people? How long have their stories been around for? You can read our article about Christmas characters from books <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Three_Popular_Christmas_Characters">here</a>.</p> <p><strong>In the meadow we can build a snowman… </strong></p> <p>The Christmas song <em>Winter Wonderland</em> features the following two lines: </p> <p>‘In the meadow we can build a snowman, <br /> and pretend that he is Parson Brown’. </p> <p>The Spellzone dictionary defines the word ‘parson’ as ‘a person authorized to conduct religious worship’. This definition puts the next two lines of the song into context:</p> <p> ‘He’ll say, “Are you married?” <br /> We’ll say, “No man! <br /> But you can do the job when you’re in town.”’ </p> <p>A couple have built a snowman and they are imagining him performing a marriage ceremony for them. When the song was written in the thirties, parsons were known to travel around and conduct weddings for couples who didn’t have a leader who was the same religion as them nearby. Parson Brown, however, was not a real person. The name is a placeholder one like Joe Bloggs, Fred Bloggs, or John Doe.</p> <p> Other versions of the song use ‘circus clown’ instead of ‘Parson Brown’. </p> <p><strong>A fairy tale they say… </strong></p> <p>A few Christmases ago we blogged about <em><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Popular_Christmas_Characters.htm">Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer</a></em> who appeared first in a book in 1939 and then in a song recorded by Gene Autry in 1949. The song was number one over Christmas and sold 2.5 million copies in its first year. </p> <p>Autry recorded <em>Frosty the Snowman</em> with the Cass County Boys in 1950 hoping to replicate the seasonal success that <em>Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer</em> had achieved. The song reached number seven in the charts and was adapted into a television special. <em>Frosty the Snowman</em>, like <em>Rudolph</em>, is now considered a seasonal classic. The song tells the story of a snowman who comes alive after some children find a magic silk hat and place it on his head: </p> <p>‘O, Frosty the snowman <br /> Was alive as he could be, <br /> And the children say he could laugh <br /> And play just the same as you and me.’ </p> <p>As is the case with all snowmen, Frosty can’t stay forever. He doesn’t melt though – instead his fun ends in rather an unusual way: </p> <p>‘He led them down the streets of town <br /> Right to the traffic cop. <br /> And he only paused a moment when <br /> He heard him holler "Stop!"</p> <p> Frosty the snow man <br /> Had to hurry on his way, <br /> But he waved goodbye saying, <br /> “Don't you cry, I'll be back again someday.”’ </p> <p>If you enjoyed this post, you can find more of our Christmas articles here: </p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Christmas_with_Spellzone.htm">Christmas with Spellzone</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Tis_the_Season_for_Christmassy_Idioms.htm">Christmassy Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Winter_Idioms.htm">Winter Idioms </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Three_Popular_Christmas_Characters.htm">Three Popular Christmas Characters</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/What_the_Dickens-qq.htm">What the Dickens? </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grottos,_caverns,_and_killing_curses.htm">Grottos, Caverns, and Curses </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Five_word_games_to_get_you_through_the_Christmas_season.htm">Christmas Games </a></li> <li>Word for Wednesdays: <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Advent.htm">advent</a>, <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Pudding.htm">pudding</a>, and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Reindeer.htm">reindeer </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzonehttps://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Advent_Anagram_Answers%21">Advent Anagrams</a></li> </ul> Wed, 20 Dec 2017 11:24:44 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Who%5Fare%5Fthese%5FChristmas%5FCharacters%2Dqq Deck the Halls, deck the halls with boughs of holly, bow, bough, bough meaning, stringed instrument, weapon for shooting arrows, how to tie a bow knot, Spellzone, English dictionary, violin bow, bow and arrow, bow of a ship, bowed head, vocabulary lists r Deck the Halls: Bow vs. Bough http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Deck%5Fthe%5FHalls%3A%5FBow%5Fvs%2E%5FBough <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>The word <strong>bow</strong> describes a number of different things:</p> <ul> <li>a curved piece of wood with taut strands that is used to play stringed instruments </li> <li>a weapon for shooting arrows </li> <li> the front of a ship </li> <li>a type of knot formed with loops</li> <li> the act of bending the head, body, or knee either in reverence or at the end of a performance </li> <li> the act of yielding to someone else’s wishes. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/bow">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is this <strong>bow</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The violinist had a lucky <strong>bow</strong>.</li> <li>She was known for her skill with a <strong>bow</strong> and arrow. </li> <li>The<strong> bow</strong> of a ship is designed to reduce the resistance of the hull cutting through the water. </li> <li>He tied his shoelaces into <strong>bows</strong>. </li> <li>She <strong>bowed</strong> to her mother’s wishes. </li> <li>At the end of the Nativity play, the children held hands and <strong>bowed</strong>.</li> <li>He took a <strong>bow</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=bow&amp;Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>bow</strong>.</p> <p>A <strong>bough</strong> is a large tree branch.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/bough">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>bough</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The <strong>boughs</strong> were covered with blossom. </li> <li>They decked the halls with <strong>boughs</strong> of holly. </li> <li>She hung a shining star upon the highest <strong>bough</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=bough&amp;Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>bough</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between<em> bow</em> and <em>bough</em>?</strong></p> <ul> <li>B<strong>ow</strong> and l<strong>ow</strong> are both spelt with the letters <strong>ow</strong>. Think of someone bending <strong>low</strong> in a <strong>bow </strong>or crouching <strong>low</strong> to tie their laces into <strong>bows</strong>. </li> <li><strong>B</strong>oughs, <strong>O</strong>ver <strong>U</strong>s, <strong>G</strong>row <strong>H</strong>igh</li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Alternate_vs._Alternative.htm">Alternate vs. Alternative</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Fri, 15 Dec 2017 13:24:38 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Deck%5Fthe%5FHalls%3A%5FBow%5Fvs%2E%5FBough confusing English words, alternate, alternative, verb, Spellzone, dictionary, definition of a word Spellzone, vocabulary lists, example sentences, English sentences, Skype American English spelling, British English spelling, Latin Commonly Confused Words: Alternate vs. Alternative http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FAlternate%5Fvs%2E%5FAlternative <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p><strong>Alternate</strong> means ‘<em>every other or every second</em>’. As a verb, it describes the act of ‘<em>taking turns</em>’. </p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/alternate">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=alternate&Search=Search">here</a> for Spellzone vocabulary lists related to it. </p> <p>Here is <strong>alternate</strong> used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>We Skype on <strong>alternate</strong> weekends. </li> <li>They <strong>alternated</strong> between driving and giving directions. </li> </ul> <p>In American English, <strong>alternate</strong> is also used to describe something that is presented as ‘<em>another option</em>’. For example: </p> <ul> <li>Would it be possible to schedule our meeting at an <strong>alternate</strong> time? </li> </ul> <p>In British English, however, this use of <strong>alternate</strong> is considered incorrect by many. The word <strong>alternative</strong> is used instead.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/alternative">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of <strong>alternative</strong> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=alternative&Search=Search">here</a> to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to it. </p> <p>Here is <strong>alternative</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>Would it be possible to schedule our meeting at an <strong>alternative</strong> time? </li> <li>If you don’t enjoy swimming, the leisure centre offers a variety of <strong>alternative</strong> activities. </li> <li>There must be an <strong>alternative</strong> solution to the problem. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p>Both <strong>alternate</strong> and <strong>alternative</strong> derive from the Latin ‘<em>alternare</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to first do one thing and then the other</em>’. Both words have been used in English since the sixteenth century. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>Alternat<strong>ive</strong> has the word <strong>I’ve</strong> in it. Come up with a sentence using both words to help you remember the context in which to use it. For example: ‘<strong>I’ve</strong> come up with an alternat<strong>ive</strong> solution.’ <br /> <br /> </li> <li><strong>Alternate</strong> rhymes with <strong>date</strong>. Come up with a sentence using both words to help you remember the context in which to use it. For example: We like to <strong>alternate</strong> between going on dinner <strong>dates</strong> and going on <strong>dates</strong> at the cinema. </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Everyday_vs._Every_Day.htm">Everyday vs. Every Day</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Elicit_vs._Illicit.htm">Elicit vs. Illicit</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Fri, 08 Dec 2017 15:41:48 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FAlternate%5Fvs%2E%5FAlternative winter idioms, idioms, Winter words, English words, cold weather, cold snap, snowball, cold comfort, cold light of day, in cold blood, on thin ice, the tip of the iceberg, add fuel to the fire, snowed under, cold sweat, get cold feet, the cold shoulder, Winter Idioms http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Winter%5FIdioms <p>Winter won’t officially come for another month, but here in England the days are getting shorter and the weather colder. We’re turning on the central heating, digging out our scarves and gloves, and sipping hot chocolate. With that in mind, here are twenty five idioms about cold weather to learn while nestled under a cosy blanket!</p> <ol> <li><strong>a cold snap</strong> – a sudden and brief period of cold weather </li> <li><strong>a snowball’s chance in hell </strong>– no chance at all </li> <li><strong>as pure as driven snow</strong> – innocent, virtuous, flawless </li> <li><strong>cold comfort</strong> – not much of a comfort, an insufficient consolation </li> <li><strong>cold light of day</strong> – a time and place from which problems can be objectively considered </li> <li><strong>in cold blood</strong> – ruthlessly </li> <li><strong>left out in the cold</strong> – neglected </li> <li><strong>on thin ice</strong> – in an unstable or risky situation </li> <li><strong>snowball effect</strong> – an escalating process, something that starts off small but grows very quickly as it picks up momentum </li> <li><strong>the tip of the iceberg</strong> – the small detectable part of a much larger and hidden problem </li> <li> <strong>to add fuel to the fire</strong> – to intensify a conflict, to make a bad situation worse </li> <li><strong>to be snowed under</strong> – to be overloaded with work </li> <li><strong>to break out in a cold sweat</strong> – to sweat due to fear or anxiety </li> <li><strong>to break the ice</strong> – to do or say something to relieve the tension </li> <li><strong>to freeze one’s blood </strong>– to be filled with sudden fear or horror </li> <li><strong>to freeze someone out</strong> – to exclude or reject someone from a group </li> <li><strong>to freeze up</strong> – to find yourself unable to do/say anything because of panic </li> <li><strong> to get cold feet</strong> – to lose your nerve </li> <li><strong>to give someone the cold shoulder</strong> – to snub someone, to be intentionally unfriendly </li> <li><strong>to go cold turkey</strong> – to abruptly and completely give something up </li> <li><strong>to go hot and cold</strong> – to feel suddenly shocked or scared </li> <li><strong>to pour/throw cold water on something</strong> – to discourage/put a stop to something </li> <li><strong>to put something on ice</strong> – to put something aside for the moment, to delay something </li> <li><strong>under the weather</strong> – unwell or in low spirits</li> <li><strong>when hell freezes over</strong> – never </li> </ol> <p>If you found this post useful, why not take a look at some of our other articles about idioms?</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Happy_Halloween%21_Twenty_Idioms_about_Death.htm">Twenty Idioms about Death</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> Mon, 27 Nov 2017 15:35:03 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Winter%5FIdioms writing in English, English sentence, English writing, improve English writing, redundant expressions, English words, adjective, verb, adverb Ten Redundant Expressions You Should Stop Using http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Ten%5FRedundant%5FExpressions%5FYou%5FShould%5FStop%5FUsing <body> <p>Last week we looked at redundant expressions and why you should cut them from your writing. Here ten examples:</p> <ol> <li> <em>I am absolutely certain that the train is at 3pm. </em><br /> <br /> Since ‘certain’ means ‘established beyond doubt or question’, the word ‘absolutely’ is redundant. A better sentence would be: <br /> <em>I am certain that the train is at 3pm.</em> <br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>They should have given us advanced warning that the road would be closed. </em><br /> <br /> A ‘warning’ is usually given ahead of time, so the word ‘advanced’ is unnecessary. Better sentences would be: <em><br /> <br /> They should have given us warning that the road would be closed. <br /> They should have warned us that the road would be closed. </em><br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>We are not hiring at the present time.</em> <br /> <br /> ‘At present’ means ‘at this time’ so you only need to use one or the other. Better sentences would be: <br /> <em><br /> We are not hiring at this time. <br /> We are not hiring at the present. <br /> We are not hiring at the moment. </em><br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>They focused on the basic essentials before moving onto more complicated tasks. </em><br /> <br /> If someone is talking about ‘the essentials’, they mean the most ‘basic’ or ‘fundamental’ information or tasks associated with a subject or activity. The word ‘basic’ is redundant. A better sentence would be: <br /> <br /> <em>They focused on the essentials before moving onto more complicated tasks. </em><br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>Their behaviour was under close scrutiny.</em><br /> <br /> ‘Scrutiny’ describes the act of ‘examining something closely’. Writing ‘close scrutiny’ means you are repeating the same idea twice. A better sentence would be: <br /> <br /> <em>Their behaviour was under scrutiny. </em><br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>There are new laws concerning taxation on foreign imports.</em><br class="style1" /> <br /> If you ‘import’ something, you are bringing it in from another country. This means that the word ‘foreign’ is redundant. Better sentences would be: <br /> <br /> <em>There are new laws concerning taxation on imports. <br /> There are new laws concerning taxation on imported goods.</em><br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>As a rough estimate, I would guess we receive five hundred emails a week. </em><br /> <br /> 'Guess' and ‘estimate’ mean the same thing: a ‘rough’ or ‘tentative’ judgment. You only need to use one or the other and you shouldn’t use either in combination with ‘rough’. Better sentences would be: <br /> <br /> <em>At a guess, I’d say we receive five hundred emails a week. <br /> We receive an estimated five hundred emails a week. <br /> We receive roughly five hundred emails a week. <br /> I estimate we receive five hundred emails a week. </em><br /> <br /> </li> <li>We are about to make a major breakthrough. <br /> <br /> A ‘breakthrough’ is an ‘important discovery’ so the word ‘major’ is redundant. A better sentence would be: <br /> <br /> <em>We’re about to make a breakthrough. </em><br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>She wished she’d planned ahead for the possibility of rain. </em><br /> <br /> ‘Planning’ is the act of ‘arranging to do something in advance’ so the word ‘ahead’ doesn’t add any extra information to the sentence. A better sentence would be: <br /> <br /> <em>She wished she’d planned for the possibility of rain. </em><br /> <br /> </li> <li><em>The meeting has been postponed until a later time. </em><br /> <br /> Like with ‘ahead’ in the previous example, ‘a later time’ doesn’t add any new information to this sentence because ‘postpone’ means ‘schedule for later’. A better sentence would be: <br /> <br /> <em>The meeting has been postponed. </em></li> </ol> Wed, 22 Nov 2017 17:32:23 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Ten%5FRedundant%5FExpressions%5FYou%5FShould%5FStop%5FUsing Improve your English writing, improve English writing, redundant expressions, tautology, English words, adjective, pay check, verb, adverb How to Improve Your Writing by Avoiding Redundant Expressions http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting%5Fby%5FAvoiding%5FRedundant%5FExpressions <p><strong>What is a redundant expression?</strong></p> <p>A redundant expression, or tautology, is an expression in which a word or group of words is unnecessary because it repeats something that has already been expressed by another word. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>This envelope <strong>contains</strong> important documents <strong>inside</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>While at first it might seem like there is nothing wrong with this sentence, if you take a closer look, you’ll notice that the word <strong>inside</strong> is redundant. This is because the word <strong>contains</strong> already indicates that the envelope holds documents within it. </p> <p><strong>Why is it important to be aware of redundant expressions when writing? </strong></p> <p>If your writing contains redundant expressions, a reader might think that you do not fully understand the meaning of the words you are using or that you are choosing them sloppily. While it might be tempting to use a longer or more unusual word because it might make you seem more knowledgeable about a subject, your writing will have quite the opposite effect if you don’t use the word correctly. </p> <p>We recommend always looking up a word in the dictionary if you are unsure of what it means and to remove it from your writing if it means the same thing as another word you have already used. Don’t forget, it is always better to use fewer words and make your point clearly than it is to use more and make it convolutedly. </p> <p><strong>What are some examples of redundant expressions? </strong></p> <p>One way of forming a redundant expression is by <strong>using two or more words with the same meaning</strong>. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>The <strong>reason</strong> for the flooding is <strong>because</strong> of the heavy rain.</li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>The words <strong>reason</strong> and <strong>because</strong> are doing the same work within the sentence, so only one is required. Better sentences would be: </p> <p>The <strong>reason</strong> for the flooding is the heavy rain. </p> <p>It flooded <strong>because</strong> of the heavy rain. </p> </blockquote> <p>Another type of redundant expression is using an adjective that repeats the meaning of the word it is describing. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>His pay check came with an <strong>added bonus</strong>. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>Since the word <strong>bonus</strong> means ‘something extra’, the word <strong>added</strong> is superfluous. A better sentence would be: </p> <p>His pay check came with a <strong>bonus</strong>. </p> </blockquote> <ul> <li> They came to a definite decision. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>The word <strong>decision</strong> refers to a plan that is finalised, so<strong> definite</strong> is not needed in this sentence. A better sentence is: </p> <p>They came to a <strong>decision</strong>. </p> </blockquote> <p>If the verb being described contains the same information that an adverb would add, leave it alone! </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>The managers decided to <strong>merge together</strong> two teams. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p>The word <strong>merge</strong> indicates that two things are being brought <strong>together</strong>, making the adverb in this sentence unnecessary. A better sentence would be. </p> <p>The managers decided to <strong>merge</strong> two teams. </p> </blockquote> <ul> <li>The teacher decided to <strong>revert back</strong> to her old method. </li> </ul> <blockquote> <p><strong>Revert</strong> describes the act of moving <strong>back</strong> to something. This means the adverb <strong>back</strong> is redundant. A better sentence would be: </p> </blockquote> <ul> <li>The teacher decided to <strong>revert </strong>to her old method. </li> </ul> <p>We’ll share more tips to help you improve your writing in future blog posts. Have a good week!</p> Thu, 16 Nov 2017 18:32:26 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=How%5Fto%5FImprove%5FYour%5FWriting%5Fby%5FAvoiding%5FRedundant%5FExpressions confusing English words, everyday, every day, common English words, Spellzone, English dictionary, adjective, example English sentences, household chores, vacuuming, washing up, everyday jeans, everyday items, corner shop, vocabulary lists, improve Engli Commonly Confused Words: Everyday vs. Every Day http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FEveryday%5Fvs%2E%5FEvery%5FDay <p><strong>Should I use everyday or every day?</strong></p> <p>If you want to describe something that is ‘common’ or ‘ordinary’, use <strong>everyday</strong>. Click <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/Everyday">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is this adjective used in some example sentences: </p> <ul> <li>He was responsible for the <strong>everyday</strong> household chores like vacuuming and washing up while she took care of the garden.</li> <li>Everyone else was dressed up and I stood out in my <strong>everyday</strong> jeans and jumper.</li> <li>You can buy <strong>everyday</strong> items like milk and bread at the corner shop.</li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=Everyday+&Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>everyday</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Every day</strong> means ‘daily’. </p> <p>Here is <strong>every day</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He did the vacuuming and washing up <strong>every day</strong>.</li> <li>It rained <strong>every day</strong> for a year.</li> <li>She made an effort to improve her spellings by practising on Spellzone <strong>every day</strong>. </li> </ul> <p><strong>When were the words every and day first joined together?</strong></p> <p><strong>Everyday </strong>has been used in English since the 1630s. It was originally used to describe clothing that was worn on ‘ordinary days’ rather than on Sundays or religious days. By 1763 the word was used more broadly as a synonym for ‘common’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between everyday and every day?</strong></p> <p>Some people find it helpful to think of <strong>every day</strong> as another way of saying <strong>each day</strong>. Let’s see what happens to our first group of example sentences if we replace the word <strong>every</strong> with the word <strong>each</strong>:</p> <ul> <li>He was responsible for the <strong>each</strong> day household chores like vacuuming and washing up while she took care of the garden.</li> <li>Everyone else was dressed up and I stood out in my <strong>each </strong>day jeans and jumper.</li> <li>You can buy <strong>each</strong> day items like milk and bread at the corner shop.</li> </ul> <p>Now let’s try it with our second group of example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He did the vacuuming and washing up <strong>each day</strong>.</li> <li>It rained <strong>each day</strong> for a year. </li> <li>She made an effort to improve her spellings by practising on Spellzone <strong>each day</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>While the second group of sentences make sense, the first group of sentences don’t mean anything. If the word <strong>each</strong> works in your sentence, use <strong>every day</strong>. If it doesn’t, use <strong>everyday</strong>.</p> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Conscience_vs._Conscious.htm">Conscious vs. Conscience</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Fri, 10 Nov 2017 08:09:41 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FEveryday%5Fvs%2E%5FEvery%5FDay Happy Halloween, idioms about death, idioms, All Hallow’s Eve, English language, dead as a dodo, dodo extinct, belly-up, dropping like flies, pushing up the daisies, six feet under, on last legs, kick the bucket, pop one’s, spooky, idioms for Halloween, Happy Halloween! Twenty Idioms about Death http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Happy%5FHalloween%21%5FTwenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FDeath <p>It’s said that on All Hallow’s Eve, for just one night, the spirits will rise and roam the earth again. If you’re scared – you’re not alone. The fear of death is so widespread in our culture that the English language is full of ways of referring to death that, in many cases, mean you don’t have to use the word itself. Here are twenty idioms about death: </p> <ol> <li><strong>as dead as a dodo</strong> – totally dead/extinct </li> <li><strong>as dead as a doornail</strong> – obviously dead </li> <li><strong>belly-up</strong> – dead </li> <li><strong>beyond the veil</strong> – in the unknown state of life after death </li> <li><strong>dropping like flies</strong> – dying in large numbers </li> <li><strong>food for worms/worm food</strong> – a dead (and buried) person </li> <li><strong>gone to glory</strong> – gone to death or destruction </li> <li><strong>pushing up the daisies</strong> – dead and buried </li> <li><strong>six feet under</strong> – dead and buried </li> <li><strong>sleeping with the fishes</strong> – dead </li> <li><strong>snuffed out</strong> – killed suddenly </li> <li><strong>someone’s number’s up/hour’s come</strong> – the time has come when someone is doomed to death, suffering, or disaster </li> <li><strong>to be on one’s last legs</strong> – to be approaching the end of one’s life </li> <li><strong>to come to/meet a sticky end</strong> – to die in an unpleasant way due to the consequences of ill-judged actions </li> <li><strong>to croak</strong> – to die </li> <li><strong>to have one foot in the grave</strong> – to be near death due to old age or illness </li> <li><strong>to kick the bucket</strong> – to die </li> <li><strong>to make the ultimate sacrifice</strong> – to give one’s life to a cause or to help someone else </li> <li><strong>to pop one’s clogs</strong> – to die </li> <li><strong>wiped out</strong> – extinct</li> </ol> <p><strong>Why not check out some of our other articles? </strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween%21.htm">Spooky Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Happy_Halloween-cc_Three_everyday_idioms_and_their_terrifying_origins">Three Everyday Idioms and their Terrifying Origins</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Friendship.htm">Twenty Idioms about Friendship</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Cats.htm">Idioms about Cats</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/25_Idioms_about_Dancing.htm">Idioms about Dancing</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Science_and_Technology.htm">Idioms about Science and Technology</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Love.htm">Thirty Idioms about Love</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_the_Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/30_Idioms_about_Books_and_Reading.htm">Thirty Idioms about Books and Reading</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/English_Idioms-cc_The_Bake_Off_Edition.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Baking</a></li> <li> Idioms about Transport and Travel – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_Transport_and_Travel-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two </a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Sea.htm">Idioms about the Sea</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_About_Talking_.htm">Thirty Idioms about Talking</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_and_Expressions_about_Chance%2C_Luck%2C_and_Opportunity.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Chance and Opportunity</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Five_Idioms_about_Keeping_and_Spilling_Secrets.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Keeping and Spilling Secrets</a></li> <li>Useful Idioms for the World of Business – <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One </a>and <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Useful_Idioms_for_the_World_of_Business-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_the_House_and_Home.htm">Twenty Idioms about the House and Home</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Back-to-School_Idioms.htm">Thirty Back-to-School Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Musical_Idioms.htm">Thirty Musical Idioms</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Idioms_about_the_Five_Senses.htm">Idioms about the Five Senses</a></li> <li><a href="• Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart">Twenty Five Idioms about the Heart</a></li> <li><a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_for_New_Beginnings.htm">Twenty Idioms for New Beginnings</a> </li> <li>Sixty Clothing Idioms – <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://spellzone.com/blog/Sixty_Clothing_Idioms-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Colourful_Idioms.htm">Thirty Colourful Idioms</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/We_Love_Halloween!.htm">Thirty Scary Idioms for Halloween</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/About_time%21.htm">Twenty Five Idioms about Time</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Five_Idioms_about_Money.htm">Thirty Five Idioms about Money</a> </li> <li>Fifty Idioms about the Human Body – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Skeleton_in_the_Closet_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Vent_Your_Spleen_and_49_Other_Idioms_about_the_Human_Body_-_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Idioms_about_Food.htm">Thirty Idioms about Food </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Fifty_Animal_Idioms.htm">Fifty Animal Idioms and What They Mean </a></li> <li>Fifty Atmosphere and Weather Idioms and What They Mean – <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_1.htm">Part One</a> and <a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/50_Atmosphere_and_Weather_Idioms_and_What_They_Mean-cc_Part_2.htm">Part Two</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Thirty_Sports_Idioms_to_Help_You_Through_the_Summer.htm">Thirty Sports Idioms to Help You Through the Summer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Twenty_Idioms_about_Nature.htm">Twenty Idioms about Nature</a></li> </ul> <p>Happy Halloween!</p> Mon, 30 Oct 2017 14:32:05 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Happy%5FHalloween%21%5FTwenty%5FIdioms%5Fabout%5FDeath Confusing English words:, conscience, conscious, Spellzone, dictionary definition, English word lists, example English sentences, guilty conscience, vocabulary lists, adjective, English language, Old French, Latin, Greek , The Online Etymology Dictionary Commonly Confused Words: Conscience vs. Conscious http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FConscience%5Fvs%2E%5FConscious <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>A <strong>conscience</strong> is one’s moral sense of right and wrong and is used to guide the way one chooses to conduct themselves. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/conscience">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>conscience</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>She wanted to skip her spelling lesson, but her <strong>conscience</strong> knew this was wrong. </li> <li>He couldn’t let go of his guilty <strong>conscience</strong> and eventually decided to own up to his crime. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/conscience">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>conscience</strong>.</p> <p>The adjective <strong>conscious</strong> describes the act of being aware of and responding to one’s surroundings. The word can also describe the act of knowing about something or doing something in a deliberate manner. Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/conscious">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>conscious</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>He didn’t seem to be <strong>conscious</strong>,so she checked his pulse. </li> <li>The head teacher was <strong>conscious</strong> of the bullying problem among the students and intervened. </li> <li>She made a <strong>conscious</strong> effort to improve her spellings by practising on Spellzone every day. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list_search.cfm?words=conscious&amp;Search=Search">here</a> to find Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word <strong>conscious</strong>. </p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>Conscience</strong> dates to the early thirteenth century and moved into English via Old French. The word derives from the Latin ‘<em>conscientia</em>’ which was probably a loan-translation of the Greek word ‘<em>syneidesis</em>’ meaning ‘<em>with-knowledge</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Conscious</strong> first started being used in English around 1600. It comes from the Latin ‘<em>conscius</em>’ meaning ‘<em>knowing, aware</em>’. </p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words? </strong></p> <ul> <li>Con<strong>science</strong> has the word <strong>science</strong> in it. Try putting both words into one sentence, for example: <em>She had a guilty con<strong>science</strong> about cheating on her <strong>science</strong> test</em>.</li> <li>Try saying the following to yourself to help you remember how to spell <strong>conscious</strong>: Always be consci<strong>ou</strong>s of your surr<strong>ou</strong>ndings. </li> <li>Try putting both words into the same sentence, for example: <em>It is important to be <strong>conscious</strong> of listening to your <strong>conscience</strong>.</em> </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bated_vs._Baited.htm">Bated vs. Baited</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Thu, 26 Oct 2017 14:40:37 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FConscience%5Fvs%2E%5FConscious confusing English words, bated, baited, diminished, moderated, bated breath, Spellzone, dictionary definition, example English sentences, vocabulary lists, bait, Old Norse, Proto Germanic , The Online Etymology Dictionary Commonly Confused Words: Bated vs. Baited http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBated%5Fvs%2E%5FBaited <p><strong>What does each word mean?</strong></p> <p>If something is <strong>bated</strong>, it means it is diminished or moderated. The word is rarely used outside of the expression ‘<em>bated breath</em>’. <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/bated">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word. <p>Here is <strong>bated</strong> used in some example sentences: <ul> <li>He waited with <strong>bated</strong> breath to see what she would say next. </li> <li>The audience watched with <strong>bated</strong> breath as the chase scene unfolded. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list including the word <strong>bated</strong>.</p> <p>If you <strong>bait</strong> something, it means you are lure, entice, or trap it. If you <strong>bait</strong> someone, it means you taunt or harass them. If something is <strong>bait</strong>, it means it is the thing being used to lure or entice.</p> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/dictionary/baited">here</a> for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.</p> <p>Here is <strong>baited</strong> used in some example sentences:</p> <ul> <li>The children loved <strong>baiting</strong> the teacher. </li> <li>I believe badger <strong>baiting</strong> was a cruel and unnecessary practice. </li> <li>She <strong>baited</strong> the fishing hook. </li> <li>We use worms as <strong>bait</strong>. </li> </ul> <p>Click <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/word_lists/list-create.cfm">here</a> to create a Spellzone vocabulary list including the word baited</p> <p><strong>Where does each word come from?</strong></p> <p><strong>Bated</strong> dates back to around 1300. It first meant ‘<em>to alleviate, allay</em>’ and then later it also meant ‘<em>supress, do away with</em>’. By the late fourteenth century, it was used as shortened version of the word ‘<em>abate</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to reduce, cease</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Bait</strong>, meaning ‘<em>to torment or persecute</em>’, dates back to around 1200. Around 1400, the word started to be used to describe the act of putting food on a fishing line or in a trap and, by the seventeenth century, <strong>baited</strong> also meant ‘<em>furnished with bait</em>’. The word comes from the Old Norse ‘<em>beita</em>’ meaning ‘<em>to bite</em>’ which comes from the Proto Germanic ‘<em>baitjan</em>’.</p> <p><strong>Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?</strong></p> <ul> <li>B<strong>ate</strong>d has the word <strong>ate</strong> in it. Breathing and eating are both actions that use the mouth. </li> <li> Ba<strong>it</strong>ed has the word <strong>it</strong> in it. Try and put both words in a sentence, such as: ‘She ba<strong>it</strong>ed <strong>it</strong>.’ </li> </ul> <p><strong>Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Flair_vs._Flare.htm">Flare vs. Flair</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Hear_vs._Here.htm">Hear vs. Here</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_e.g._vs._i.e..htm">e.g. vs. i.e.</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/_Confused_Words-cc_Poll_vs._Pole.htm">Poll vs. Pole</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Who_vs._Whom.htm">Who vs. Whom</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Wait_vs._Weight.htm">Wait vs. Weight</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Son_vs._Sun.htm">Son vs. Sun</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Curb_vs._Kerb.htm">Curb vs. Kerb</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Complacent_vs._Complaisant.htm">Complacent vs. Complaisant</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dear_vs._Deer.htm">Deer vs. Dear</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Rain_vs._Reign_vs._Rein.htm">Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Heal_vs._Heel.htm">Heal vs. Heel</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Draw_vs_Drawer.htm">Draw vs. Drawer</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Tail_vs_Tale.htm">Tail vs. Tale</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Defuse_vs._Diffuse.htm">Defuse vs. Defuse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Adverse_vs._Averse.htm">Adverse vs. Averse</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cue_vs._Queue.htm">Cue vs. Queue</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Coarse_vs._Course.htm">Coarse vs. Course</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Broach_vs._Brooch.htm">Broach vs. Brooch</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ascent_vs._Assent.htm">Ascent vs. Assent</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cereal_vs._Serial.htm">Cereal vs. Serial</a> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Dual_vs._Duel.htm">Dual vs. Duel</a><br /> </li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borne_Vs._Born.htm">Born vs. Borne</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Pore_vs._Pour.htm">Pore vs. Pour</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Affect_Vs._Effect.htm">Affect vs. Effect</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confused_Words-cc_Aisle_vs._Isle.htm">Aisle vs. Isle</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_-ice_Nouns_vs._-ise_Verbs.htm">-ice Nouns vs. –ise Verbs</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Borrow_vs._Lend.htm">Borrow vs. Lend</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Confusing_Contractions.htm">Confusing Contractions</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_May_Vs._Might.htm">May vs. Might</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Ensure_vs._Insure.htm">Ensure vs. Insure</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Quiet_vs._Quite.htm">Quiet vs. Quite</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Prescribe_vs._Proscribe.htm">Prescribe vs. Proscribe</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Is_it_practise_or_practice-qq.htm">Practice vs. Practise</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Stationary_vs._Stationery.htm">Stationary vs. Stationery</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_A_vs._An.htm">A vs. An</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lie_vs._Lay.htm">Lie vs. Lay</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Cite_vs._Site_vs._Sight.htm">Cite vs. Site vs. Sight</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Passed_vs._Past.htm">Passed vs. Past </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Weather_vs._Whether_vs._Wether.htm">Weather vs. Whether vs. Wether</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Then_vs._Than.htm">Then vs. Than </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Are_vs._Our_vs._Hour.htm">Are vs. Hour vs. Our </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Device_vs._Devise.htm">Device vs. Devise </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bear_vs._Bare.htm">Bare vs. Bear </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Uninterested_vs._Disinterested.htm">Uninterested vs. Disinterested </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Less_vs._Fewer.htm">Less vs. Fewer </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Allowed_vs._Aloud.htm">Allowed vs. Aloud </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Desert_vs._Dessert.htm">Desert vs. Dessert </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_To_vs._Too_vs._Two.htm">To vs. Too vs. Two </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Break_vs._Brake.htm">Break vs. Brake </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm">Bought vs. Brought</a><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Bought_vs._Brought.htm"></a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Lose_vs._Loose.htm">Lose vs. Loose</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/Commonly_Confused_Words-cc_Accept_vs._Except.htm">Accept vs. Except</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/A_Word_for_Wednesday-cc_Imply_or_Infer-qq.htm">Imply vs. Infer</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/effect_or_affect..._confused-qq_You_are_not_alone%21.htm">Effect vs. Affect </a></li> <li><a href="http://www.spellzone.com/blog/'Neither_here_nor_their...'.htm">Their vs. There vs. They're</a></li> </ul> <p>Sources: <a href="http://www.etymonline.com/index.php">The Online Etymology Dictionary</a>. </p> Tue, 17 Oct 2017 16:09:27 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Commonly%5FConfused%5FWords%3A%5FBated%5Fvs%2E%5FBaited past tense forms, past tense, English words, regular verbs, irregular verbs, spelling rules, spelt or spelled, spell, American English spellings, British English spelling, British or American spellings, English language, American English, English spelling Words with Sneaky Past Tense Forms http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5Fwith%5FSneaky%5FPast%5FTense%5FForms <p>When forming the past tense, words are split into regular and irregular verbs. In the case of regular verbs, the past tense is formed by adding ‘<em>ed</em>’ to the end of a verb (or just the letter ‘<em>d</em>’ if the verb ends in the letter ‘<em>e</em>’). Irregular verbs, on the other hand, do not follow the normal rules. This week, we’re taking a look at five words with confusing past tense forms.</p> <p><strong>Is it ‘spelt’ or ‘spelled’? </strong></p> <p>We couldn’t resist starting with this one! ‘Spell’ is one of a few verbs that has both a regular past tense form and an irregular one. The past tense and past participle of this word can be either ‘spelled’ or ‘spelt’. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>I <strong>spelled</strong> three words incorrectly in my test. </li> <li>I <strong>spelt</strong> three words incorrectly in my test. </li> <li>I had <strong>spelled</strong> three words incorrectly in my test.</li> <li>I had <strong>spelt</strong> three words incorrectly in my test. </li> </ul> <p>In American English, ‘spelled’ is the favoured past tense form and ‘spelt’ is considered incorrect, while in British in English ‘spelt’ is more popular (though ‘spelled’ is also acceptable’). Here at Spellzone, we tend to use the latter – hopefully we haven’t alienated our American students! Don’t forget that the <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/pages/british-american.cfm">Spellzone course covers both British and American spellings</a>. </p> <p>Other verbs with regular and irregular formations include burn – burned/burnt, smell – smelled/smelt, and dream – dreamed/dreamt. </p> <p><strong>Is it ‘sneaked’ or ‘snuck’? </strong></p> <p>When the verb ‘sneak’ first started cropping up in English in the sixteenth century its past tense and past participle form was ‘sneaked’. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>She <strong>sneaked</strong> past the guards. </li> <li>She had <strong>sneaked</strong> past the guards. </li> </ul> <p>Around three hundred years later, however, the irregular past tense form ‘snuck’ began appearing in American English. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> She <strong>snuck</strong> past the guards.</li> <li>She had <strong>snuck</strong> past the guards. </li> </ul> <p>Today there is much debate over whether or it is acceptable to use the past tense form ‘snuck’, with many people insisting that only ‘sneaked’ is correct. At Spellzone, we believe that English spelling rules should evolve depending on popular usage and that as long as you are consistent throughout a piece of writing, both past tense forms are fine to use. What is interesting, though, is that while most irregular verbs have fallen out of use in favour of their regular versions, the verb ‘sneak’ has gone the other way and, especially in America, ‘snuck’ is perhaps more widely used than ‘sneaked’.</p> <p>Usage of the verb ‘creep’, which has a similar meaning to ‘sneak’, is beginning to move in the opposite direction. The past tense and past participle form of this word is ‘crept’, but due to the common phrase ‘creep out’, the use of ‘creeped’ is becoming more widespread. </p> <p>For example:</p> <ul> <li>She <strong>crept</strong> past the guards. </li> <li>She had <strong>crept</strong> past the guards. </li> <li>The horror film <strong>creeped </strong>us out. </li> <li>The horror film had <strong>creeped </strong>them out. </li> </ul> <p>While ‘crept’ is the correct past tense form, it is acceptable to make exceptions in specific contexts such as with the above example. </p> <p><strong>Is it ‘shrunk’ or ‘shrank’? </strong></p> <p>Possibly due to the mistake in the title of the film <em>Honey, I Shrunk the Kids</em>, people often get confused when forming the past tense of the verb ‘shrink’. This irregular verb has different simple past tense and past participle forms.</p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> He accidentally <strong>shrank</strong> his jeans in the wash.</li> <li>He had accidentally <strong>shrunk</strong> his jeans in the wash. </li> </ul> <p>This means that the film should actually be called <em>Honey, I Shrank the Kids</em>, but doesn’t that sound odd? We so often hear the incorrect past tense form of this verb that when we hear the correct version it ‘sounds wrong’ because we are not expecting it.</p> <p>Have a good week!</p> Tue, 10 Oct 2017 09:35:59 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Words%5Fwith%5FSneaky%5FPast%5FTense%5FForms hyphen, hyphens, compound words, prefix, word lists, prefixes, what is a prefix, prefix examples, vowel, hyphenated, hyphens in lists, punctuation, spelling, grammar Other Ways of Using Hyphens http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Other%5FWays%5Fof%5FUsing%5FHyphens <p>A hyphen is a short dash which is used to link words together. Last week, we learned how to use hyphens in compound words. Today, we will look at how to use hyphens when adding a prefix to another word, how to use hyphens to denote word breaks, and how to use hyphens to stand in for repeated parts of words in lists.</p> <p><strong>Using Hyphens to Join Prefixes to Other Words</strong></p> <p><strong>What is a prefix?</strong></p> <p>A prefix is a collection of letters that is added to the beginning of a word in order to modify its meaning. Prefixes are not usually words in their own right. </p> <p>Here are some examples of prefixes: </p> <ul><li>un- </li> <li>pre- </li> <li>multi- </li> <li>post- </li> <li>super- </li> </ul> <p><strong>Do I need to use a hyphen every time I add a prefix to a word? </strong></p> <p>As with many of the examples we shared in last week’s article on hyphens and compound words, the most important thing to remember is to focus on clarity. Does the word make sense without a hyphen? Will the addition of a hyphen make your meaning clearer? </p> <p>Some people prefer to use a hyphen when a prefix ends with a vowel and the other word also begins with one. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>pr<strong>e</strong>-<strong>e</strong>minent </li> <li>c<strong>o</strong>-<strong>o</strong>pt. </li> </ul> <p>It is acceptable to write these words without a hyphen and indeed this particular use of the hyphen has become less popular than it once was. Make sure you pick one style and use it consistently within a piece of writing. </p> <p>Hyphens are also used between a prefix and a name or a date. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>post-1980s technology </li> <li>pre-Shakespearean drama. </li> </ul> <p>Finally, hyphens are used to avoid mixing up similar words. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li> re-cover (to cover something that has been covered before) vs. recover (to become healthy) </li> <li>co-op (a cooperative group) vs. coop (a pen where chickens are kept). </li> </ul> <p><strong>Using Hyphens to Divide Words </strong></p> <p>Sometimes you need to split a word that is not usually hyphenated. </p> <p>If, for example, a word does not fit neatly on a line of writing, you may choose to put part of the word on one line and part of it on the next. In this instance, a hyphen should be used to show where the word is split. When choosing where to split the word, it is important to avoid confusing your reader. Use syllable breaks to guide you. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>cup-board is much clearer than cupb-oard </li> <li> bed-room is much clearer than be-droom or bedr-oom </li> </ul> <p><strong>Using Hyphens in Lists </strong></p> <p>If the second part of all the words in a list is the same, a hyphen can be used to stand in for this part of the word in all the words except the last one. </p> <p>For example: </p> <ul> <li>two-, three-, or fourfold </li> <li>uni-, bi-, and tricycles </li> </ul> <p>If you are interested in learning more about punctuation, you can find some of our other articles <a href="https://www.spellzone.com/blog/Grammar_and_Punctuation_Tips.htm">here</a>. </p> <p>Have a good week!</p> Wed, 04 Oct 2017 10:37:55 GMT http://www.spellzone.com/blog/post.cfm?title=Other%5FWays%5Fof%5FUsing%5FHyphens