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Commonly Confused Words: Wait vs. Weight


What does each word mean?

The word wait refers to the act of staying in one place in anticipation or expectation of something happening. The word also describes the act of serving food when in relation to a waiter or waitress.

Click here for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.

Here is wait used in some example sentences:

  • We waited for the bus.
  • She decided to wait until she’d read the book before watching the film adaptation.
  • He had an evening job waiting tables.
  • There’s an hour-long wait to go on the rollercoaster.
  • We had a long wait at the airport.

Click here to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word wait.

The weight of something refers to how heavy it is. The word is also used to describe a type of sports equipment used for strength training.

Click here for the full Spellzone dictionary definition of the word.

Here is weight used in some example sentences:

  • The baby was a healthy weight.
  • She enjoys lifting weights at the gym.

Click here to find the Spellzone vocabulary lists related to the word weight.

Where does each word come from?

The word wait comes from the Old North French ‘waiter’ meaning ‘look-out, watch, sentry’.

Weight comes from the Old English ‘gewhit’ which in turn comes from the Proto Germanic ‘wihti’.

Are there any tricks to help remember the difference between these words?

  • Waiting Always Is Tedious
  • Weight has the word eight in it.
  • Use the word heavy to help you remember weight has the letter ‘h’ in it.

Where can I find other posts about easy-to-confuse words?

Sources: The Online Etymology Dictionary.


15 May 2017
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"Spellzone fits in beautifully with our Scope and Sequence of Phonological Awareness and Spelling. It also aligns perfectly with the four areas of spelling knowledge and uses the Brain, Ears, Eyes approach to learning spelling."
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